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Thinking Strategically About Contentby Scott Abel, The Content WranglerLocalization World Singapore, April 12, 2013
web: www.contentwrangler.comtwitter: @contentwranglerScott AbelThe Content Wrangler
content marketersocial media choreographerXML evangelisttrouble-makertechnical documentation expertmagazine columnist/blog...
content strategyMy area of speciality is
Let’s start with acommon vocabulary!
content?what isContent is the lifeblood of yourorganization. It’s the stuff thathelps you accomplish yourbusiness goals.Ann...
content?what isThere are many types of content.Some content is aimed at internalaudiences, other content iscreated for ext...
content strategy?what isContent strategy is a repeatablesystem that governs themanagement of contentthroughout its entire ...
content strategy?what is the purpose ofIt’s about envisioning the futureof content -- its development,management, delivery...
content strategyimportant, but notStrategists do not get lost in theminutiae. What should beincluded in the style guide? W...
content strategistconcerns of aContent strategists are concernedwith actions, resources, costs,opportunities, threats, and...
vision?what isVision is what you want yourcontent to help you accomplish inthe future. It should be a clear,concise, and e...
visionexample“Create source content that canbe translated into 12 targetlanguages by machine with 90%accuracy by 2016”
visionexample“Become the largest retailer (bysales volume) of smartphones toLatin Americans living in theUnited States by ...
content strategistanother name for aContent strategists are businessconsultants for content.Rahel Bailie @RahelAB
critical eyewhat’s needed is aLet’s take a look at some oftenoverlooked areas of waste in thecontent production lifecycle ...
time-suckersidentifying
manufacturingthink of content production asThe Japanese make great stridesin manufacturing in the 1970sand 1980s by adopti...
innovation?how do you find time forFirst,take an honest and criticallook at every single step in yourcontent lifecycle. You...
this way herewe’ve always done itor...avoid lame excuses like
that way herewe’ve never done itlame excuses like
productivitystart with
What is this?
What is this?
rulesthese are
What is this?
What are these?
What is this?
rulesthese are
Who is this?
Deanactually, his name is
rule enforcerhe is a
What is this?
toolDean’s rule enforcement
The EditorWho is this?
Steveactually, his name is
this presentationhe has no idea I used his photo inshhhhh...
rule enforcerhe is a
rule enforcerhe prides himself on being a
inefficienthe is horriblylike the majority of us
Have you ever misplaced you keys?
The EditorSo has Steve.
left his car keyshe can’t remember where he
memorize...but he want us to believe he can
style guide rules750
branding rules125
grammar ruleshundreds of grammar
terminologyhis corporate and industry
on demandand recall these rules
has never seenwhile reading content he
left his car keysbut, he can’t remember where he
editingSteve’s biggest time-sucker is
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisRelying on outdated approacheslike memorizing a style guide isindefensible when challenge...
Software can be used to automate tasks thathumans are ill-equipped to perform efficientlyand effectively -- like editing. By ...
time-suckerthe biggest
priority to emailwe assign falseWe tend to try and answer emailas soon as possible. Why? Notbecause we know it is timesens...
emailnegative impacts ofWhen we constantly monitor ouremail inbox, we fail to fullyconcentrate on a single task. As aresul...
emailadditional impacts ofThe cost of email is not free.Email relies on servers, software,electricity, and more often than...
metricsemailIn addition to being the wrongtool for many jobs, the averageemployee spends 28% of thework week dealing with ...
metricsemailThat’s 13 hours a week or650 hours per year!
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisAdopt alternatives to email (IM,social media and the telephone).Admit that they often pro...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisDo not use email to set upmeetings with groups of people.Instead, use a meetingmanagement...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisDo not hit the “reply all” buttonunless absolutely necessary.
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisAsk yourself, “Do I really need toreply to this message right now?”and “What will happen ...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisIf you really need to send anemail, write it so it is easy to scan.Include numbered lists...
example1. To translate the Adobe FrameMaker files Ineed the source files by Tuesday.2. I will need the illustrations by Tues...
time-suckersmore
authoringmore specifically, collaborativereview and editing, too
collaborationwe have yet to masterWe pretend that we are workingas a team toward a common goal.Usually, that’s not the case.
collaborationchange is involved inMost often, our collaborativeefforts don’t actually save time.We use new tools and oldpro...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisMake everyone on the “team”understands what a team is andwhat it is not. Ensure everyone ...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisPick up the telephone and geteveryone on the line. Open thedocument you are working on,di...
time-suckerone more
contenttime wasted looking for
reusing itrecreating it, instead of
contenttime wasted looking for85% of knowledge workerscomplain that not being able tofind the right information is ahuge ti...
contenttime wasted looking forKnowledge workers spend onaverage 2.3 hours per day lookingfor content; one in ten spend fou...
time-suckerhow to get rid of thisFind ways to make content easyto find and reuse for you and forthose you work with.
presentationtakeaways from thiscontent is a business assetworthy of being managedeffeciently andeffectively
presentationtakeaways from thistaking a critical look at the wayyou do things today willhelp you find time toinnovate
presentationtakeaways from thisborrowing lessons learned frommanufacturing can helpus uncover inefficiencies
presentationtakeaways from thisa little common sense goes along way
learn more?where can you
Managing Enterprise ContentA Unified Content Strategyby Ann Rockley and Charles Cooper (New Riders 2012)
Content Strategy:Connecting the Dots BetweenBusiness, Brand, and Benefitsby Rahel Bailie and Noz Urbina (XML Press, 2012)
Document EngineeringAnalyzing and DesigningDocuments for BusinessInformatics and Web Servicesby Robert Glushko and Tim McG...
The Discipline of Organizingby Robert Glushko (2013 MIT Press)
Come up and see me for a set.
web: www.contentwrangler.comtwitter: @contentwranglerScott AbelThe Content Wrangler
Thinking Strategically About Contentby Scott Abel, The Content Wrangler
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore
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Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore

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In this presentation from Localization World Singapore, April 2013, Scott Abel explores the importance of thinking strategically about content (how it is created, why its created, and the goals of global content initiatives) by helping the audience understand the importance of vision in content strategy. The presentation also touches on how organizations can find time for innovation and provides several resources for content strategy professionals.

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Transcript of "Thinking Strategically About Content - Localization World Singapore"

  1. 1. Thinking Strategically About Contentby Scott Abel, The Content WranglerLocalization World Singapore, April 12, 2013
  2. 2. web: www.contentwrangler.comtwitter: @contentwranglerScott AbelThe Content Wrangler
  3. 3. content marketersocial media choreographerXML evangelisttrouble-makertechnical documentation expertmagazine columnist/bloggerconference presenterconference organizerinstructor UC Berkeleynightclub djmy personal metadata
  4. 4. content strategyMy area of speciality is
  5. 5. Let’s start with acommon vocabulary!
  6. 6. content?what isContent is the lifeblood of yourorganization. It’s the stuff thathelps you accomplish yourbusiness goals.Ann Rockley @ARockley
  7. 7. content?what isThere are many types of content.Some content is aimed at internalaudiences, other content iscreated for external audiences.
  8. 8. content strategy?what isContent strategy is a repeatablesystem that governs themanagement of contentthroughout its entire lifecycle.Rahel Bailie @RahelAB
  9. 9. content strategy?what is the purpose ofIt’s about envisioning the futureof content -- its development,management, delivery -- andcreating a plan that helps usleverage content toachieve our future goals.
  10. 10. content strategyimportant, but notStrategists do not get lost in theminutiae. What should beincluded in the style guide? Whatfont should we use? Should weuse the passive voice?Do we need a blog?
  11. 11. content strategistconcerns of aContent strategists are concernedwith actions, resources, costs,opportunities, threats, andtimetables associated withproducing content thathelp us meet our goalsand support our vision.
  12. 12. vision?what isVision is what you want yourcontent to help you accomplish inthe future. It should be a clear,concise, and easy-to-understanddescription of the futureyou desire.
  13. 13. visionexample“Create source content that canbe translated into 12 targetlanguages by machine with 90%accuracy by 2016”
  14. 14. visionexample“Become the largest retailer (bysales volume) of smartphones toLatin Americans living in theUnited States by 2014”
  15. 15. content strategistanother name for aContent strategists are businessconsultants for content.Rahel Bailie @RahelAB
  16. 16. critical eyewhat’s needed is aLet’s take a look at some oftenoverlooked areas of waste in thecontent production lifecycle touncover time-sucking tasks thatprevent us frominnovating.
  17. 17. time-suckersidentifying
  18. 18. manufacturingthink of content production asThe Japanese make great stridesin manufacturing in the 1970sand 1980s by adopting leanmanufacturing practices and justin time delivery.
  19. 19. innovation?how do you find time forFirst,take an honest and criticallook at every single step in yourcontent lifecycle. You may haveto enlist the help from a specialistin operational efficiency.
  20. 20. this way herewe’ve always done itor...avoid lame excuses like
  21. 21. that way herewe’ve never done itlame excuses like
  22. 22. productivitystart with
  23. 23. What is this?
  24. 24. What is this?
  25. 25. rulesthese are
  26. 26. What is this?
  27. 27. What are these?
  28. 28. What is this?
  29. 29. rulesthese are
  30. 30. Who is this?
  31. 31. Deanactually, his name is
  32. 32. rule enforcerhe is a
  33. 33. What is this?
  34. 34. toolDean’s rule enforcement
  35. 35. The EditorWho is this?
  36. 36. Steveactually, his name is
  37. 37. this presentationhe has no idea I used his photo inshhhhh...
  38. 38. rule enforcerhe is a
  39. 39. rule enforcerhe prides himself on being a
  40. 40. inefficienthe is horriblylike the majority of us
  41. 41. Have you ever misplaced you keys?
  42. 42. The EditorSo has Steve.
  43. 43. left his car keyshe can’t remember where he
  44. 44. memorize...but he want us to believe he can
  45. 45. style guide rules750
  46. 46. branding rules125
  47. 47. grammar ruleshundreds of grammar
  48. 48. terminologyhis corporate and industry
  49. 49. on demandand recall these rules
  50. 50. has never seenwhile reading content he
  51. 51. left his car keysbut, he can’t remember where he
  52. 52. editingSteve’s biggest time-sucker is
  53. 53. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisRelying on outdated approacheslike memorizing a style guide isindefensible when challenged.Automating enforcement ofwriting rules is one way togain efficiency.
  54. 54. Software can be used to automate tasks thathumans are ill-equipped to perform efficientlyand effectively -- like editing. By freeingeditors of busy work, they will be able toread, augment and improve content.THE EDITING PROCESS IS AN EASYPLACE TO FIND INEFFICIENCIESSOME EDITORSWON T LIKE THIS!THEY MISTAKENLY SEE THEIRVALUE AS ENFORCERS OF RULESTHEIR REAL VALUE IS IN ENHANCINGAND IMPROVING CONTENTTHEY SHOULD NOT BE SPOTTING STYLE ANDBRANDING ERRORS, GRAMMAR PROBLEMS,TYPOS --> OR FINDING YOUR CAR KEYSTHERE ARE SOFTWARE TOOLS FARBETTER SUITED FOR SUCH TASKS
  55. 55. time-suckerthe biggest
  56. 56. priority to emailwe assign falseWe tend to try and answer emailas soon as possible. Why? Notbecause we know it is timesenstive. Not because it isimportant. But, because itarrived in our inbox.
  57. 57. emailnegative impacts ofWhen we constantly monitor ouremail inbox, we fail to fullyconcentrate on a single task. As aresult, our productivity drops.
  58. 58. emailadditional impacts ofThe cost of email is not free.Email relies on servers, software,electricity, and more often thanwe might admit, toner and paper.
  59. 59. metricsemailIn addition to being the wrongtool for many jobs, the averageemployee spends 28% of thework week dealing with internalemail messages that addno business value.
  60. 60. metricsemailThat’s 13 hours a week or650 hours per year!
  61. 61. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisAdopt alternatives to email (IM,social media and the telephone).Admit that they often prove abetter, faster mode ofcommunication.
  62. 62. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisDo not use email to set upmeetings with groups of people.Instead, use a meetingmanagement tool.
  63. 63. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisDo not hit the “reply all” buttonunless absolutely necessary.
  64. 64. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisAsk yourself, “Do I really need toreply to this message right now?”and “What will happen if I don’t?”
  65. 65. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisIf you really need to send anemail, write it so it is easy to scan.Include numbered lists to make itclear what you are asking and tomake it easy for therecipient to reply.
  66. 66. example1. To translate the Adobe FrameMaker files Ineed the source files by Tuesday.2. I will need the illustrations by Tuesdayafternoon 5pm PT.3. The job will be ready on Thursday.4. The price is $3,000 USD.5. Who do I invoice? What’s their emailaddress and their telephone number?
  67. 67. time-suckersmore
  68. 68. authoringmore specifically, collaborativereview and editing, too
  69. 69. collaborationwe have yet to masterWe pretend that we are workingas a team toward a common goal.Usually, that’s not the case.
  70. 70. collaborationchange is involved inMost often, our collaborativeefforts don’t actually save time.We use new tools and oldprocesses to do pretty much thesame thing we did before.
  71. 71. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisMake everyone on the “team”understands what a team is andwhat it is not. Ensure everyone isworking toward a measurable,common goal.
  72. 72. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisPick up the telephone and geteveryone on the line. Open thedocument you are working on,discuss it, make changes, and endthe call with a completeddocument.
  73. 73. time-suckerone more
  74. 74. contenttime wasted looking for
  75. 75. reusing itrecreating it, instead of
  76. 76. contenttime wasted looking for85% of knowledge workerscomplain that not being able tofind the right information is ahuge time-waster.
  77. 77. contenttime wasted looking forKnowledge workers spend onaverage 2.3 hours per day lookingfor content; one in ten spend fouror more hours on average days.
  78. 78. time-suckerhow to get rid of thisFind ways to make content easyto find and reuse for you and forthose you work with.
  79. 79. presentationtakeaways from thiscontent is a business assetworthy of being managedeffeciently andeffectively
  80. 80. presentationtakeaways from thistaking a critical look at the wayyou do things today willhelp you find time toinnovate
  81. 81. presentationtakeaways from thisborrowing lessons learned frommanufacturing can helpus uncover inefficiencies
  82. 82. presentationtakeaways from thisa little common sense goes along way
  83. 83. learn more?where can you
  84. 84. Managing Enterprise ContentA Unified Content Strategyby Ann Rockley and Charles Cooper (New Riders 2012)
  85. 85. Content Strategy:Connecting the Dots BetweenBusiness, Brand, and Benefitsby Rahel Bailie and Noz Urbina (XML Press, 2012)
  86. 86. Document EngineeringAnalyzing and DesigningDocuments for BusinessInformatics and Web Servicesby Robert Glushko and Tim McGrath (2005 MIT Press)
  87. 87. The Discipline of Organizingby Robert Glushko (2013 MIT Press)
  88. 88. Come up and see me for a set.
  89. 89. web: www.contentwrangler.comtwitter: @contentwranglerScott AbelThe Content Wrangler
  90. 90. Thinking Strategically About Contentby Scott Abel, The Content Wrangler
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