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Norwegian Christmas
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Norwegian Christmas

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  • 1. CHRISTMAS IN NORWAY
  • 2. CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS
    • The start of the Christmas preparation is when late autumn the best wheat is gathered and saved until Christmas. Then it is put on poles. These make nice perches for the birds. If many birds are eating, it means a good year for growing crops. On Christmas Day many families go to church and then spend a quiet day together. This time is given to remembering the reason for Christmas warmth and joy, the birth of Jesus nearly 2000 years ago.
  • 3. THE NORWEGIAN NISSE
    • Nissen is a short, stocky fellow with a long, grey beard and a red knitted cap.
    • He brings children Christmas gifts.
    • On the farm, he helps with the work in mysterious ways. Nissen expects being served a large wooden bowl filled rice porridge on Christmas Eve.When the people on the farm go to find the bowls the next morning, the dishes are licked clean. That is proof enough that nissen really exists!
    • Most families in Norway have a tradition that one of the family members dress up like nisse by putting on a stiff mask and a costume, Christmas Eve. The nisse with his sack knocks on the door. He asks the question: "Good evening, are there any good children here?” "Yes, I am good," most children say. Norwegians know deep in their heart that the nisse lives. That is why Norwegians still fill wooden bowls with porridge and take them to their barns on Christmas Eve because no one can be sure.
  • 4. CHRISTMAS TREES IN NORWAY
    • Everyone has either a spruce or a pine tree in their living room - decorated with white lights, Norwegian flags and other ornaments for Christmas. The children make paper baskets and chains of coloured paper. The baskets can be filled with candy or nuts. Christmas trees became common in Norway from around 1900. Before the presents are opened, the family dances in a ring around the tree while singing traditional Norwegian Christmas carols.
  • 5. CHRISTMAS TREE FACTS
    • Did you know that the Christmas trees at Union Station, Washington D.C., Trafalgar Square in London and Edinburgh, Scotland are from Norway?
    • In 1947 the British authorities received a Christmas tree from Oslo as a special thanks for the help and support Britain gave to Norway and Norwegians during the occupation years from 1940 to 1945. Since then, the Christmas tree at Trafalgar Square has become an annual tradition.
  • 6. THE CHRISTMAS STAMPS 2009
    • The Norwegian Christmas stamps for 2009 pictures Christmas decorations. In the background you can see the lyrics of two Christmas songs; "Glade Jul" (Silent Night) and "Jeg synger julekvad".
    • The stamps cost NOK 8.00 and have printed in 12.5 million copies.
  • 7. HOW TO MAKE CHRISTMAS BASKETS
    • Take two pieces of colored paper about 8x12 cm and fold them in half (where the scissor is) before rounding the edge on the top. Cut several slots 2/3 of the way up from the bottom on both halves.              
    • Weave the two sides together.
    • Make a handle and glue it to the insides of the basket. Hang the basket on your Christmas tree and fill it up with goodies !
  • 8. CHRISTMAS COOKIES
    • Gingersnaps 150 g syrup 100 g sugar 1 1/2 dl cream 100 g butter 450 g wheat flour 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon ginger 1/4 teaspoon aniseed 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon horn salt 3/4 teaspoon baking soda Bring the syrup, sugar, and cream to a boil. Add the butter and cool the mixture until lukewarm. Sift in the dry ingredients. Keep the dough cold until the next day. Roll the dough thin and cut out the snaps and lay them on a greased tin. Put half a blanched almond on each. To give the cookies a gloss, they can be brushed with egg white. Bake for about 5 minutes at 175 C.
  • 9. A TYPICAL NORWEGIAN CHRISTMAS DINNER
    • "Pinnekjøtt" - salted lamb ribs
    • Pinnekjøtt is rib of lamb, which has been either salted and
    • dried or salted, smoked and dried.
    • Go out in the woods and find enough fresh  branches from a birch tree (finger thick) to cover the bottom of your pot. Remove the bark.
    • Put the branches in your pot and and fill it with enough water to cover the branches
    • Place the ribs over the branches and cook until the meat loosens from the bone (apprx. 2 hours)
    • Be careful so the pot doesn't cook dry - refill water as necessary
    • "Pinnekjøtt" is normally served with mashed kohlrabi (turnip) or rutabaga, boiled potatoes and mustard. Don't forget the aquavit and cold Christmas beer.
  • 10. CHRISTMAS SONGS IN NORWAY
  • 11. SOURCES:
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LU4R3tUFlk
    • http://www.stavanger-web.com/jul/christma.htm

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