Whats happening in education 2011
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Whats happening in education 2011

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What's Happening in Education - Tom Elwick

What's Happening in Education - Tom Elwick

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  • What is an Academy? Academies are publicly funded independent schools that benefit from greater freedoms to help innovate and raise standards. These include freedom from local authority control, ability to set pay and conditions for staff, freedom from following the National Curriculum and the ability to change the lengths of terms and school days. The Government has expanded the Academies Programme through legislation in the Academies Act 2010. This enables all maintained primary, secondary and special schools to apply to become an Academy. As of 1 October 2011 there are 1,350 academies open in England, including 14 special academies.
  • Where are they in the North East http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/b0069811/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development What are the Benefits of being an Academy? On top of the £25,000 towards conversion costs from the Department for Education, Academies can potentially top up their budget by as much as 10%. This is because on top of the regular per pupil funding, it gets money that would previously have been held back by the local authority. Councils use this to provide services, such as special needs support, to schools across the borough. If the school is able to buy in the services it needs more cheaply, or has less need of those services, it can benefit financially from becoming an academy. Now large academy chains runs schools creating economies of scale themselves. More freedom over staff pay can mean they make savings or attract and retain good teachers by paying more, while control over the length of the school day can allow them to teach more lessons.
  • What are they FREE SCHOOLS ARE SET UP BY GROUPS OF PARENTS, TEACHERS, CHARITIES, BUSINESSES, UNIVERSITIES, TRUSTS, RELIGIOUS OR VOLUNTARY GROUPS, BUT FUNDED DIRECTLY BY CENTRAL GOVERNMENT. THEY CAN BE RUN BY AN "EDUCATION PROVIDER" - AN ORGANISATION OR COMPANY BROUGHT IN BY THE GROUP SETTING UP THE SCHOOL - BUT THESE FIRMS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO MAKE A PROFIT. THE SCHOOLS ARE ESTABLISHED AS ACADEMIES, INDEPENDENT OF LOCAL AUTHORITIES AND WITH INCREASED CONTROL OVER THEIR CURRICULUM, TEACHERS' PAY AND CONDITIONS, AND THE LENGTH OF SCHOOL TERMS AND DAYS.
  • 24 Free schools opened in September Semi-independent schools, outside local authority control funded by the taxpayer Seventeen primaries, six secondariess and two all-age schools At least six set up by faith groups, others have a "faith ethos" At least five will be run by academy chains Four are private schools transferring in to the state sector About six are parent- or teacher-led There will be 3 Free schools opening in the North East in 2012 Grindon Hall Free School Sunderland All-Through www.grindonhall.com/homepage.asp Barwick’s Own 2nd Secondary School (BO2SS) Stockton-on-Tees Secondary www.inglebybo2ss.co.uk Cramlington Village Primary School Northumberland Primary http://villageprimary.org/
  • the government should ensure league table measures  do not give schools perverse incentives to divert low-attaining pupils onto courses and qualifications that are not recognised by employers or accepted by colleges. 16-19 students in full-time education should not follow a programme which is entirely 'occupational'. Programmes for the lowest attainers should concentrate on the core academic skills of English and maths. Students under 19 without a good GCSE pass in English and/or maths should be required  to follow a course leading either directly to these qualifications or towards future GCSE course entry. Key Skills should not be considered a suitable qualification in this context. Funding for full-time students aged 16-18 should be on a programme basis, with a given level of funding per student. Employers who take on 16-18 year old apprentices should be eligible for payments, as they are bearing some of the cost of students with a right to free education. Teachers qualified to teach in FE colleges should automatically be qualified to teach in schools (which is not currently the case). The government should introduce a league table measure which focuses on the whole distribution of perfromance within a school, including those at both the top and bottom ends of the distribution.
  • the government should ensure league table measures  do not give schools perverse incentives to divert low-attaining pupils onto courses and qualifications that are not recognised by employers or accepted by colleges. 16-19 students in full-time education should not follow a programme which is entirely 'occupational'. Programmes for the lowest attainers should concentrate on the core academic skills of English and maths. Students under 19 without a good GCSE pass in English and/or maths should be required  to follow a course leading either directly to these qualifications or towards future GCSE course entry. Key Skills should not be considered a suitable qualification in this context. Funding for full-time students aged 16-18 should be on a programme basis, with a given level of funding per student. Employers who take on 16-18 year old apprentices should be eligible for payments, as they are bearing some of the cost of students with a right to free education. Teachers qualified to teach in FE colleges should automatically be qualified to teach in schools (which is not currently the case). The government should introduce a league table measure which focuses on the whole distribution of perfromance within a school, including those at both the top and bottom ends of the distribution.
  • UTCs are academies for 14-19-year-olds. They focus on providing technical education that meets the needs of modern employers. They offer technical courses and work-related learning, combined with academic studies.  All UTCs: are sponsored by a local university and employers. It is also usual for FE colleges and other educational institutions – like established academy trusts - to work in partnership with them; specialise in two curriculum areas (e.g. engineering and science); teach core GCSEs alongside technical qualifications, and we expect them to offer young people the opportunity to achieve the English Baccalaureate; focus on disciplines that require highly specialised equipment, for example, engineering, manufacturing and construction; teach these disciplines alongside developing young people’s business, ICT and design skills to prepare students for a range of careers and continuing education at 19; and have 500 to 800 students. The Baker Dearing Educational Trust plays a key role in developing partnerships and advising on applications for UTCs. Two UTCs are already open – the JCB Academy in Staffordshire, and the Black Country UTC in Walsall. Newcastle Science, technology, engineering and maths
  • The English Baccalaureate is a new performance measure introduced in the 2010 performance tables. It recognises the success of pupils who attain GCSEs or iGCSEs at grades A*-C across a core of academic subjects - English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language. It has been introduced because we are concerned that the number of pupils, especially those in disadvantaged areas, who receive this broad education in core academic subjects, is far too small. We want to encourage more pupils to take these core academic subjects and bring about greater fairness of opportunity, so that all pupils have the chance to study for the English Baccalaureate.
  • What are they? A teaching school is an outstanding school that has a strong track record of collaborative working, and has been designated by us to play a key role in the leadership of a teaching school alliance. This new designation gives outstanding schools the role of leading the training and professional development of teachers, support staff and headteachers as well as contributing to the raising of standards through school-to-school support. Teaching schools will bring together provision for training and development from initial teacher training (ITT) through to headship under a single school designation.
  • www.nationalcollege.org.uk/teachingschools How does this effect the North East?
  • give teachers greater professional freedom over how they organise and teach the curriculum develop a National Curriculum that acts as a benchmark for all schools and provides young people with the knowledge they need to move confidently and successfully through their education, taking into account the needs of different groups including the most able and pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) ensure the content of our National Curriculum compares favourably with the most successful international curricula in the highest performing jurisdictions, reflecting the best collective wisdom we have about how children learn and what they should know set rigorous requirements for pupil attainment that measure up to those in the highest performing jurisdictions in the world enable parents to understand what their children should be learning throughout their school career and therefore to support their education.

Whats happening in education 2011 Whats happening in education 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • What’s happening in Education 2011 Thomas Elwick Keystage 3/4 Learning Officer Regional Renaissance Learning Team
  • Academies Free Schools Key Stage 4 & Post - 16 E-Bacc Teaching Schools National Curriculum Review
  • Academies Publicly Funded Independent School Free from Local Authority Control Can be a Primary or Secondary School As of the 1 st October 2011 there are 1350 Academies in England
  • Perks to becoming an Academy £25,000 to convert Can potentially top up budget by 10% Can buy in services more cheaply Freedom over staff pay Do not have to follow the National Curriculum
  • Academies in the North East Initially only schools rated as Outstanding by Ofsted were to be converted but this is has been opened out to other schools. In the North East there are a number of maintained schools that have converted to Academies and many that are many that have applied and are awaiting approval For a list of schools that are converting please visit the DFE website: http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/b0069811/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development
  • Free Schools A Free School can be set up by Parents, Teachers, Charities, Businesses, Universities, Trusts, Religious or Voluntary groups Funding is provided by Central Government Once established the Free school is effectively run like an Academy with similar privileges
  • Free Schools There are currently no Free Schools in the North East. 24 Free schools opened in September 17 Primary, 6 Secondary and 2 all-age schools 4 set up by faith groups & some others have a "faith ethos" 5 run by academy chains 4 are private schools transferring in to the state sector 6 are parent or teacher-led There will be 3 Free Schools opening in the North East in September 2012
  • North East Free Schools so far (September 2012) Grindon Hall Free School in Sunderland Primary & Secondary www.grindonhall.com/homepage.asp Barwick’s Own 2nd Secondary School in Stockton-on-Tees Secondary School www.inglebybo2ss.co.uk Cramlington Village Primary School in Northumberland Primary School http:// villageprimary.org /
  • Vocational Qualifications, Key Stage 4, and Post 16. Wolf Review University Technical Colleges English Baccalaureate
  • The Wolf Report On 10 May 2011 the Department for Education published Professor Alison Wolf’s report into education. She was asked to consider how vocational education for 14- to 19-year-olds can be improved in order to promote successful progression into the labour market and into higher level education and training routes. The Government have accepted all her recommendations
    • The system must stop ‘tracking’ 14 to 16 year olds into ‘dead-end’ courses.
    • The system must be made honest so young people are not pushed into damaging decisions.
    • The system must be dramatically simplified to remove perverse incentives.
    • We should learn best practice from countries doing things better than us, such as Denmark, France and Germany.
    The Wolf Report
    • The Learning leaving age of 18 introduced by the last Government remains
    • The statutory need to provide work experience to KS4 has been removed
    • Programmes for lower attainers must concentrate English & Maths
    • Under 19s without good GCSE in Maths or and or English must aim to achieve it. Key skills no longer a suitable Qualifications
    • FE Lecturers can to be allowed to teach in schools
    The Wolf Report
  • University Technical Colleges UTCs are academies for 14-19-year-olds. They focus on providing technical education that meets the needs of modern employers. They offer Technical courses, Work-related learning alongside Academic study.  sponsored by a local university and employers. FE colleges and other educational institutions can work in partnership with them
    • UTC’s will
    • Specialise in two curriculum areas (e.g. engineering and science);
    • Focus on disciplines that require highly specialised equipment, for example, engineering, manufacturing and construction;
    • Offer Career or Education progression
    • They have between 500 to 800 students.
    • Two UTCs are already open – the JCB Academy in Staffordshire, and the Black Country UTC in Walsall.
    • Newcastle is getting one!
  • English Baccalaureate The English Baccalaureate is a new performance measure introduced in the 2010 performance tables. It recognises the success of pupils who attain GCSEs or iGCSEs at grades A*-C across a core of academic subjects - English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language.
  • Teaching Schools An Outstanding School Strong track record of collaborative work Primary or Secondary schools First schools given designation this September A Teaching school will be responsible for training some Initial teacher Training and provide further professinoal development of Qualified teachers. www.nationalcollege.org.uk/teachingschools
  • Teaching School Alliance More than 1 teaching school in an Alliance Strategic Partners Teaching school Network
  • Which Schools have become Teaching Schools in the North East?
    • St Thomas More Catholic School in Gateshead (Secondary)
    • St. John Vianney RC Primary School & Holy Trinity CE in Hartlepool (Primary)
    • Sacred Heart High School in Newcastle upon Tyne (Secondary)
    • Shiremoor Primary School in North Tyneside (Primary)
    • Whitley Bay High School in North Tyneside (Secondary)
    • Harton Technology College in South Tyneside (Secondary)
  • “As it has developed, the National Curriculum has come to cover more subjects, prescribe more outcomes and take up more school time than originally intended. It is our intention that the National Curriculum be slimmed down so that it properly reflects the body of essential knowledge in key subjects and does not absorb the overwhelming majority of teaching time in schools. A slimmed-down National Curriculum will also free up teachers to use their professional judgement to design curricula that meet the needs of their pupils.”  The National Curriculum Review On 20 th January 2011 the Coalition Government announced a review of The National Curriculum
  • The review will do the following: Replace the current substandard curriculum with one based on the best school systems in the world, providing a world-class resource for teachers and children Consider what subjects should be compulsory at what age Consider what children should be taught in the main subjects at what age.
    • Review’s Aims
    • The National Curriculum should have the following aims at its heart:
    • to embody rigour and high standards and create coherence in what is taught in schools
    • to ensure all children have the opportunity to acquire a core of essential knowledge in the key subject disciplines
    • beyond that core, to allow teachers the freedom to use their professionalism and expertise to help all children realise their potential.  
    • Current Aims
    • It should enable all young people to become:
    • successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve
    • confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives
    • responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society.
    • Objectives of the new Curriculum
    • Give teachers greater freedom over the Curriculum
    • Develop a National Curriculum that acts as a benchmark for all schools, providing young people with the knowledge they need to move confidently and successfully through their education,
    • Ensure the content of our National Curriculum compares favourably with the most successful international curricula
    • Set rigorous requirements for pupil attainment that measure up to those in the highest performing jurisdictions in the world
    • Enable parents to understand what their children should be learning throughout their school career
  • Timetable of Review
    • January 2011 Review launched
    • January 2011 Call for Evidence (phase one) begins
    • April 2011 Call for Evidence (phase one) ends
    • Early 2012 Public consultation on phase one recommendations (including new Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education
    • Early 2012 Call for Evidence (phase two) begins
    • Spring 2012 Ministers announce decisions on (1) the Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education and (2) the other subjects to be included in the new National Curriculum
    • Spring 2012 Call for Evidence (phase two) ends
    • September 2012 New Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education made available to schools
    • Early 2013 Public consultation on new Programmes of Study for all other subjects to be included in the National Curriculum
    • Spring 2013 Ministers announce decisions about the Programmes of Study for all other subjects to be included in the National Curriculum
    • September 2013 Teaching of the new Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education becomes statutory
    • September 2013 New Programmes of Study for all other subjects included in the new National Curriculum are made available to schools
    • September 2014 Teaching of the new Programmes of Study for all other subjects to be included in the National Curriculum becomes statutory
  • September 2012 New Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education made available to schools September 2013 Teaching of the new Programmes of Study for English, mathematics, science and physical education becomes statutory September 2013 New Programmes of Study for all other subjects included in the new National Curriculum are made available to schools September 2014 Teaching of the new Programmes of Study for all other subjects to be included in the National Curriculum becomes statutory Most Important dates to Consider
  • Useful Resources & Links The National Curriculum http://curriculum.qcda.gov.uk/ Department for Education http://education.gov.uk EduBase http://www.edubase.gov.uk/home.xhtml There was lots of information I used before the Coalition took power? Uk Government Web Archive http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/