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English 102: Spring 2010: Week Two: January 28, 2010
 

English 102: Spring 2010: Week Two: January 28, 2010

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    English 102: Spring 2010: Week Two: January 28, 2010 English 102: Spring 2010: Week Two: January 28, 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • English 101: Comp & Lit IIWeek 2: January 28, 2010
      Thursday, 6:00-8:40 PM
      Professor Melinda Roberts
    • Today’sAgenda
      Review Syllabus
      Exploring Fiction
      Literature: Personal Response and Critical Thinking
      Preparing a First Response Paper
      Using the Class Blog / Website
      Homework Assignment
      6:00 PM: Class Begins
      7:20-7:30 PM: Break
      8:40 PM: Class Ends
    • Exploring Fiction: The Reader as Participant
      The exploration of literature begins with YOU
      Your engagement with the literature creates the literary experience
      A piece of literature is only words on a page until YOU read the words, bring them to life, and give them meaning
      YOU give meaning to the literature
      background (national origin, race, creed, gender, etc.)
      personality
      prior experiences with literature
      knowledge of the world
    • Exploring Fiction:The Reader as Participant
      Literature demands our attention, our reflection, our examination
      Literature requires an investment of emotion and the connection of knowledge and experience
      When we learn to appreciate the nuances of literature, we develop the ability to think and to write critically about it
    • Exploring Fiction:The Methods of Fiction
      Tone: the “mood” of the story
      tone depends on the reader’s delicate emotional responses to language and situation
      Plot: the series of events that create the fictional world of the story
      the arrangement of connected sequence of narrative events
      beginning, middle, end
      Characterization: the process by which the characters are rendered to make them seem real to the reader
      round character
      flat character
      short story writers develop characters rapidly and limit number of round characters (rarely more than three)
    • Exploring Fiction:The Methods of Fiction
      Setting: a single geographical location within a short period of time (time and place)
      historical setting
      social setting
      Point of View: who is narrating the story?
      first person (“I”)
      third person: narrator does not appear as a character in the story; story told from outside (“he,” “she,” “they”)
      “omniscient narrator”
      knows thoughts, feelings, actions of all characters
      “limited omniscient narrator”
      knows thoughts, feelings, actions of a single character
    • Exploring Fiction:The Methods of Fiction
      Irony: the gap between what is expected and what occurs
      Theme: underlying idea, statement the work makes about its subject
      look to the protagonist (main character)
      what is he/she “striving” for?
      what is the protagonist’s “epiphany”?
      sudden flash of recognition that signals the awareness / understanding of moral complexity
      the passage from childhood to adulthood (coming of age)
    • Exploring Fiction:Criticisms for Analysis
      Biographical: how does the author’s life experiences influence his/her writing?
      Historical: how does the historical setting of the story affect/influence the behavior of the characters?
      Sociological: how does the sociological setting of the story affect/influence the behavior of the characters?
    • Exploring Fiction:Criticisms for Analysis
      Psychological: Freud
      What are the underlying conscious and unconscious motives of the author? the characters?
      Oedipus Complex / Electra Complex
      Mythological: Jung
      the “collective consciousness”
      symbols, allegories, hidden meaning
    • Personal Response and Critical Thinking
      To think critically about literature, we build on our personal responses –
      record our responses
      review our responses
      discuss our responses with peers
      support our responses with valid evidence
      Critical thinking does not mean searching for one right answer. There may be as many answers as there are readers.
      Your best answers are those that analyze and articulate your response in light of supporting evidence.
    • Personal Response and Critical Thinking: Written Response
      A written response IS NOT:
      a summary of a particular literary work that you’ve read
      A written response IS:
      a short essay that expresses your personal reaction to a particular literary work
      a short essay that conveys your thoughts and feelings about an aspect of a particular literary work
      a short essay that discusses how a particular literary work affectedyou as you read it
    • Personal Response and Critical Thinking: Written Response
      A written response DOES NOT:
      require you to do outside research
      A written response DOES
      require a careful reading of the literature, clear thinking about what the author has written, and honest writing in response to the what you’ve thought, felt, questioned, disagreed with, agreed with, were touched by – i.e., how you were affected by / how you connected to the particular piece of literature
      present your point of view in a clear and organized manner
    • Responding to Literature
      From the surface level to the core
      “Surface” Level Evaluation / Response
      “Meat” Level Evaluation / Response
      “Core” Level Evaluation / Response
    • Responding to Literature
      “Surface” Level
      Title (consider its import)
      Narrator (point of view)
      First person (“I”)
      Third person (“he,” “she”, “they”)
      Character
      Who is the protagonist?
      Who is the antagonist?
      Who are the minor characters?
    • Responding to Literature
      Comments at the Surface Level
      From the title, I thought the story was about . . .
      When I first met _____, I thought he/she/it was . . .
      __________ (someone or something) reminded me . . .
      I don’t understand . . .
      I want to learn more about . . .
    • Responding to Literature
      “Meat” Level
      Character
      Goals
      Motives
      Behavior
      Dialogue
      Inner thoughts
      Who says what to whom?
      Who says what about whom?
      Flashback(s)
      Have there been any?
    • Responding to Literature
      “Meat” Level
      Mood
      What is the psychological “feeling” of the literature?
      Does the setting contribute to the “feeling” of the literature?
      Irony
      Have there been any surprises? Outcomes that were the opposite of what you expected?
      Symbols
      What has more than one meaning?
    • Responding to Literature
      Comments at the Meat Level
      I liked / I didn’t like . . . because . . .
      I understood / didn’t understand why . . . because . . .
      I felt ___ when ___ said, “. . .,” because . . .
      I was surprised . . .
      I thought ____ should / should not have . . .
      The story made me feel . . .
      I liked / didn’t like when the author used _____ to symbolize . . . because . . .
    • Responding to Literature
      “Core” Level:
      Has the author “met” you with his/her writing?
      Have you had a change of attitude?
      Has the writing challenged your beliefs?
      Has the writing reinforced your beliefs?
      Has the writing affected you in any other way?
    • Responding to Literature
      Comments at the Core Level
      The story made me feel . . .
      I don’t understand why . . .
      I could relate to . . .
      I could not relate to . . .
      __________ reminds me of . . .
      This story compares with . . .
      I felt _____ when . . .
    • Back to you . . .
      Think about the last piece of literature you read. What was the title? Who is the author? Why did you read it? Choose 3-5 adjectives to describe your experience with the literature. Discuss your responses with a partner.
      When I read a good book . . . I wish that life were three thousand years long.
      Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • “The Kiss”
      Kate Chopin
      (February 1850-August 1904)
      Work with a partner. What do you know about the lives of women in the late 1800s? What was expected of them? What was important to them? How did a woman choose her husband? How did a man choose his wife? With your partner, jot down five things you know about women’s lives in the late 1800s. Be prepared to share with the class.
    • “The Kiss”
      Kate Chopin
      (February 1850-August 1904)
      Which is more important – to marry for love, or to marry for money?
    • “The Kiss”
      Read / listen to the story (10 minutes)
      Make notes / highlight passages / circle new vocabulary words
      Read the story a second time (10 minutes)
      Make additional notes
      Write a first response paper (you will have 20 minutes)
      Share your first response with a partner (you will have 10 minutes)
    • Personal Response and Critical Thinking
      A response paper IS NOT:
      a summary of a particular literary work that you’ve read
      A response paper IS:
      a short essay that expresses your personal reaction to a particular literary work
      a short essay that conveys your thoughts and feelings about an aspect of a particular literary work
      a short essay that discusses how a particular literary work affectedyou as you read it
    • Personal Response and Critical Thinking
      A response paper DOES NOT:
      require you to do outside research
      A response paper DOES
      require a careful reading of the literature, clear thinking about what the author has written, and honest writing in response to the what you’ve thought, felt, questioned, disagreed with, agreed with, were touched by – i.e., how you were affected by / how you connected to the particular piece of literature
      present your point of view in a clear and organized manner
    • Class Blog / Website
      http://english102wcc02.blogspot.com/
      Log on
      Sign up to follow
      Review homework assignments
      Respond to “post a comment” activities (participation / non-participation affects your grade)
    • First Response Paper:Guidelines
      8.5x11-inch paper
      1-inch margins
      typed, double-spaced, Cambria 12 font
      Short Story: minimum one (1) page; maximum two (2) pages
      Poetry: minimum three-quarter (3/4) page; maximum one (1) page
      IMPORTANT NOTE: Papers that do not meet these guidelines will not be accepted. See your syllabus/class website for further specific details.
    • First Response Paper:Guidelines
      Upper left-hand corner of the paper, single-spaced:
      FIRST AND LAST NAME
      February 4, 2010
      Professor Melinda Roberts
      English 102: Spring 2010
      Centered Title (all caps and bolded):
      RESPONSE PAPER: ”YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN”
      RESPONSE PAPER: “THIS BE THE VERSE”
      IMPORTANT NOTE: Papers that do not meet these guidelines will not be accepted. See your syllabus/class website for further specific details.
    • Homework: Due February 4, 2010 @ 6:00 PM
      Purchase class texts
      Log on to class website
      sign up as “follower”
      response to “post a comment” prompts
      Readings from Literature: The Human Experience
      Chapter 1: pages 1-21
      Chapter 1: pages 38-42
      “Young Goodman Brown,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne (pages 81-91)
      check class website for first response writing prompt
      “This Be The Verse,” by Philip Larkin (pages 159-160)
      check class website for first response writing prompt
      Archetypes in Literature
      check class website for link to handout