• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Leadership
 

Leadership

on

  • 733 views

Organizational behavior

Organizational behavior

Statistics

Views

Total Views
733
Views on SlideShare
733
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
79
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Leadership Leadership Presentation Transcript

    • ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
    • O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Contrast leadership and management. 2. Summarize the conclusions of trait theories. 3. Identify the limitations of behavioral theories.L E A R N I N G 4. Describe Fiedler’s contingency model. 5. Explain Hersey and Blanchard’s situational theory. 6. Summarize leader-member exchange theory. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 11–2
    • O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d) AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 7. Describe the path-goal theory. 8. Identify the situational variables in the leader- participation model.L E A R N I N G © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 11–3
    • What Is Leadership?What Is Leadership? management Use of authority inherent in designated formal rank to obtain compliance from organizational members© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 11–4
    • Trait TheoriesTrait Theories Leadership Traits:: Leadership Traits •• Ambition and energy Ambition and energy •• The desire to lead The desire to lead •• Honesty and Honesty and integrity integrity •• Self-confidence Self-confidence •• Intelligence Intelligence •• Job-relevant Job-relevant© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. knowledge knowledgeAll rights reserved. 11–5
    • Trait TheoriesTrait Theories Limitations:: Limitations •• No universal traits that predict leadership No universal traits that predict leadership in all situations. in all situations. •• Traits predict behavior better in “weak” Traits predict behavior better in “weak” than “strong” situations. than “strong” situations. •• Unclear evidence of the cause and effect Unclear evidence of the cause and effect of relationship of leadership and traits. of relationship of leadership and traits. •• Better predictor of the appearance of Better predictor of the appearance of leadership than distinguishing effective leadership than distinguishing effective and ineffective leaders. and ineffective leaders.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 11–6
    • Behavioral TheoriesBehavioral Theories •• Trait theory: Trait theory: Leaders are born, not made. Leaders are born, not made. •• Behavioral theory: Behavioral theory: Leadership traits can be taught. Leadership traits can be taught.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 11–7
    • Ohio State StudiesOhio State Studies© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 11–8
    • University of Michigan StudiesUniversity of Michigan Studies© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 11–9
    • The The Managerial Managerial Grid Grid© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 11– 11-1All rights reserved. 10
    • Scandinavian StudiesScandinavian Studies© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 11
    • Contingency Theories: Fiedler’s ModelContingency Theories: Fiedler’s Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 12
    • Fiedler’s Model: Defining the SituationFiedler’s Model: Defining the Situation© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 13
    • Findings from Fiedler ModelFindings from Fiedler Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 11– 11-2All rights reserved. 14
    • Cognitive Resource TheoryCognitive Resource Theory Research Support: : Research Support • • Less intelligent individuals Less intelligent individuals perform better in leadership perform better in leadership roles under high stress than roles under high stress than do more intelligent do more intelligent individuals. individuals. • • Less experienced people Less experienced people perform better in leadership perform better in leadership roles under low stress than roles under low stress than do more experienced do more experienced people. people.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 15
    • Hersey and Blanchard’s Situational LeadershipHersey and Blanchard’s Situational LeadershipTheoryTheory s n es ng w illi d y an ilit : ab e ss in e ad rr we lo Fol Leader: decreasing need for support and supervision© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 16
    • Leader–Member Exchange TheoryLeader–Member Exchange Theory© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 17
    • Leader-Member Exchange TheoryLeader-Member Exchange Theory© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 11– 11-3All rights reserved. 18
    • Path-Goal TheoryPath-Goal Theory© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 19
    • The Path-Goal TheoryThe Path-Goal Theory© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 11– 11-4All rights reserved. 20
    • Leader-Participation ModelLeader-Participation Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 11–All rights reserved. 21
    • Contingency Variables in the RevisedContingency Variables in the RevisedLeader-Participation ModelLeader-Participation Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 11– 11-5All rights reserved. 22