ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR                                      S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S                               ...
O B J E C T I V E S                       AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                       YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO:       ...
O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d)                                AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                                YO...
Technology in the WorkplaceTechnology in the Workplace Continuous Improvement Processes   – Good isn’t good enough   – Fo...
Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)process reengineeringRethinking and redesigning th...
Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.     ...
What’s an e-Organization?What’s an e-Organization?© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.        16–7
What’s an e-Organization? (cont’d)What’s an e-Organization? (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.         ...
What Defines an What Defines an E-Organization? E-Organization?   (Private)                            (Global)© 2003 Pren...
Selected Implications for Individual BehaviorSelected Implications for Individual Behavior Motivation   – Cyberloafing: u...
Selected Implications for Group BehaviorSelected Implications for Group Behavior Decision Making   – Individual decision ...
Selected Implications for Group Behavior Selected Implications for Group Behavior(cont’d) (cont’d) Communication   – Trad...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasksTasks                            • Re...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)requisite task...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)              ...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentic...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentic...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentic...
The Job Characteristics ModelThe Job Characteristics Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.       EXHIBIT   16–                   ...
Computing a Motivating Potential ScoreComputing a Motivating Potential Score People who work on jobs with high core dimens...
Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)              ...
Work Space DesignWork Space Design Size   – The trend is away from traditional allocation of space     based on organizat...
Work Space Design (cont’d)Work Space Design (cont’d) Feng Shui   – Designing work surroundings so the “Chi” or life force...
Work Redesign OptionsWork Redesign Options© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.   16–All rights reserved.        24
Guidelines for Enriching a JobGuidelines for Enriching a Job© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.        EXHIBIT   16–                ...
Work Redesign Options (cont’d)Work Redesign Options (cont’d) Team-Based Work Designs Revisited   – The Job Characteristic...
Work Schedule OptionsWork Schedule Options© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.   16–All rights reserved.        27
Example of a Flextime ScheduleExample of a Flextime Schedule© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.        EXHIBIT   16–                ...
Work Schedule OptionsWork Schedule Options                            Categories of                            Categories ...
TelecommutingTelecommuting Advantages                 Disadvantages   – Larger labor pool        (Employer)   – Higher p...
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Ch16

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Organizational behavior

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Ch16

  1. 1. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
  2. 2. O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1.Contrast process reengineering and continuous 2.Describe an e-organization.L E A R N I N G 3.Summarize the implications of e-organizations 4.Explain the job characteristics model. 5.Contrast the social information processing © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 16–2
  3. 3. O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d) AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 6. Explain how work space design might influence employee behavior. 7. Describe how a job can be enriched. 8. Contrast flextime and job sharing. 9. Compare the benefits and drawbacks to telecommuting from the employee’s point ofL E A R N I N G view. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 16–3
  4. 4. Technology in the WorkplaceTechnology in the Workplace Continuous Improvement Processes – Good isn’t good enough – Focus is on constantly reducing the variability in the organizational processes to produce more uniform products and services. • Lowers costs and raises quality. • Increases customer satisfaction. – Organizational impact • Additional stress on employees to constantly excel. • Requires constant change in organization.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 16–4
  5. 5. Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)process reengineeringRethinking and redesigning the Key Elements: Key Elements:processes by which the 1. Identifying an 1. Identifying anorganization creates value and organization’s organization’sdoes work, ridding itself of distinctive distinctiveoperations that have become competencies.antiquated. competencies. 2. Assessing core 2. Assessing core processes. processes. 3. Reorganizing 3. Reorganizing horizontally by horizontally by process. process.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 16–5
  6. 6. Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)Technology in the Workplace (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 16–6
  7. 7. What’s an e-Organization?What’s an e-Organization?© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 16–7
  8. 8. What’s an e-Organization? (cont’d)What’s an e-Organization? (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 16–8
  9. 9. What Defines an What Defines an E-Organization? E-Organization? (Private) (Global)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 16-1All rights reserved. 16–9
  10. 10. Selected Implications for Individual BehaviorSelected Implications for Individual Behavior Motivation – Cyberloafing: using the organization’s Internet access for personal and nonjob-related surfing. Ethics – The dilemma of electronic surveillance of employees and employee privacy rights is exacerbated by the increasingly blurring line between work and nonwork time for employees.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. Selected Implications for Group BehaviorSelected Implications for Group Behavior Decision Making – Individual decision making models will become increasingly obsolete in team-based e-organizations. – Group decision making models will have greater relevance in e-organizations. – Success e-organizations will replace rational decision making models with action models that: • Utilize trial and error. • Gather and assimilate data quickly. • Accept failure and learn from it.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. Selected Implications for Group Behavior Selected Implications for Group Behavior(cont’d) (cont’d) Communication – Traditional hierarchical levels will no longer constrain communication to formal organization channels. – Virtual meetings will allow widely dispersed employees to communicate more frequently. – Open communications can create information overload. Politics and Networking – The normal face-to-face activities of effective politicians (e.g., impression management) will be supplemented by cyber-schmoozing.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasksTasks • Requisite Task Attributes Theory • Job Characteristics Model • Social Information Processing Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)requisite task attributestheory Task Characteristics: Task Characteristics: 1. 1. Variety VarietyComplex and challenging jobsincrease employee satisfaction 2. 2. Autonomy Autonomyand reduce absenteeism, 3. 3. Responsibility Responsibilityrecognizing individual 4. 4. Knowledge and skill Knowledge and skilldifferences in job involvement. 5. Required social 5. Required social interaction interaction 6. Optional social 6. Optional social interaction interaction© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d) Characteristics: Characteristics: 1. Skill variety 1. Skill variety 2. 2. Task identity Task identity 3. 3. Task significance Task significance 4. 4. Autonomy Autonomy 5. 5. Feedback Feedback© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 15
  16. 16. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 16
  17. 17. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 17
  18. 18. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. The Job Characteristics ModelThe Job Characteristics Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 16– 16-4All rights reserved. 19
  20. 20. Computing a Motivating Potential ScoreComputing a Motivating Potential Score People who work on jobs with high core dimensions are People who work on jobs with high core dimensions are generally more motivated, satisfied, and productive. generally more motivated, satisfied, and productive. Job dimensions operate through the psychological states in Job dimensions operate through the psychological states in influencing personal and work outcome variables rather influencing personal and work outcome variables rather than influencing them directly. than influencing them directly.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 16– 16-5All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. Conceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkConceptual Frameworks for Analyzing WorkTasks (cont’d)Tasks (cont’d) Concept: Concept: Employee attitudes and Employee attitudes and behaviors are responses behaviors are responses to social cues by others. to social cues by others.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. Work Space DesignWork Space Design Size – The trend is away from traditional allocation of space based on organizational statue towards a flexible open space design that accommodates group and team activities. Arrangement – Open arrangements foster social interaction and influence the formality of relationships Privacy – Individual employee needs for workplace privacy are largely a function of the type of work that the employee does (e.g., programmers, HR managers, receptionists).© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 22
  23. 23. Work Space Design (cont’d)Work Space Design (cont’d) Feng Shui – Designing work surroundings so the “Chi” or life force of the space is in harmony and balance with nature. Workspace Design and Productivity – Workspaces alone don’t provide substantial motivation. – Workspaces make it easier for employees to perform behaviors that make them more effective. – “Cognitive ergonomics”: matching the office to the brain work.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. Work Redesign OptionsWork Redesign Options© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 24
  25. 25. Guidelines for Enriching a JobGuidelines for Enriching a Job© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 16– 16-7All rights reserved. 25
  26. 26. Work Redesign Options (cont’d)Work Redesign Options (cont’d) Team-Based Work Designs Revisited – The Job Characteristics Model (JCM) predicts high performance of groups when: • Group members use a variety of high level skills. • The group task is a whole and meaningful piece of work. • Outcomes of the group’s work has significant consequences for other people. • The group has substantial autonomy in deciding how they do the work. • Work on the task generates regular, trustworthy feedback.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 26
  27. 27. Work Schedule OptionsWork Schedule Options© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 27
  28. 28. Example of a Flextime ScheduleExample of a Flextime Schedule© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 16– 16-8All rights reserved. 28
  29. 29. Work Schedule OptionsWork Schedule Options Categories of Categories of telecommuting jobs: telecommuting jobs: • • Routine information Routine information handling tasks handling tasks • • Mobile activities Mobile activities • • Professional and other Professional and other knowledge-related tasks knowledge-related tasks© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 29
  30. 30. TelecommutingTelecommuting Advantages  Disadvantages – Larger labor pool (Employer) – Higher productivity – Less direct – Less turnover supervision of employees – Improved morale – Difficult to coordinate – Reduced office- teamwork space costs – Difficult to evaluate non-quantitative performance© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 16–All rights reserved. 30

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