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Risk of second wave of deaths from Pakistan's flood is very high Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Flood in Pakistan Risk of second wave of deaths from Pakistan's flood is very high
  • 2. September, 17, 2010 - The World Health Organization says that the risk of second wave of deaths from Pakistan's flood is very high Waterborne diseases such as cholera could spread and cause large numbers of deaths. Dr. Guido Sabatinelli says there have been 57 confirmed cases of the disease in recent weeks. Malaria and measles also pose an immediate risk. a long-term concern is malnutrition, which already affected large numbers of children in rural Pakistan before the floods and is likely to worsen due to the disaster. In Pakistan's flood, The Children and also a half-million pregnant women are among most vulnerable victims
  • 3. Reuters Pictures Flies cover the face of two-year-old flood victim Farhan as he suffers from an eye infection while taking refuge with his family in a relief camp in Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province, September 17, 2010.
  • 4. Reuters Pictures Five year old flood victim Aabdi, who suffers from eye infection, eats a meal outside her family tent while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victim in Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province September 17, 2010.
  • 5. AP Photo - People who survived floods live in a tent at a camp setup for displaced people in Pubbi, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Millions of people are affected and displaced by heavy flooding in Pakistan.
  • 6. AP Photo - People who survive floods wait for a relief supply in a camp setup for displaced people in Pubbi, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Millions of people are affected and displaced by heavy flooding in Pakistan.
  • 7. AP Photo - Pakistani women who survive floods wait for a relief supply in a camp setup for displaced people in Pubbi, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Millions of people are affected and displaced by heavy flooding in Pakistan. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad.
  • 8. Reuters Pictures - UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres (R) visits a village destroyed by floods in Pabbi, located in Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 16, 2010.
  • 9. Children cross a flooded area on empty oil drums, near an army run relief camp in Sehwan, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 16, 2010. Antonio Guterres of the UN refugee agency on Thursday urged the world to do far more to help Pakistan recover from catastrophic floods that hit millions, on the eve of a major new UN appeal in New York. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, leaving more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) Getty Images A flood affected Pakistani man carries his elderly mother from a Pakistani navy rescue helicopter in Khanpor Kali Mori on September 16, 2010.
  • 10. SEHWAN SHARIF, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 16: Sakeena, 22, sits with her daughters three-year-old Satara and six-year-old Kahalda and what is left of her belongings, after being displaced by flooding and separated from her husband, and evacuated to a Pakistan Army run flood relief camp on September 16, 2010 on the outskirts of Sehwan Sharif in the Jamshoro District of Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 11.   Getty Images - Children cross a flooded area on empty oil drums, near an army run relief camp in Sehwan, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 16, 2010. Antonio Guterres of the UN refugee agency on Thursday urged the world to do far more to help Pakistan recover from catastrophic floods that hit millions, on the eve of a major new UN appeal in New York. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, leaving more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival.
  • 12. AP Photo - A Pakistani child who survived floods holds a doll at a temporary shelter set up for displaced people in Dhadda northern Pakistan, Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010. Monsoon rains triggered massive floods six weeks ago that spread across the country and are still continuing in parts of the south. Some 8 million people have been made homeless in what Pakistani and U.N. officials have said is one of the largest humanitarian disasters in living memory.
  • 13. AP Photo - A Pakistani woman prays, who survived floods prays at a temporary shelters set up for displaced people at Makile graveyard, in Thatta northern Pakistan, Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010.
  • 14.   AP Photo - Pakistani children who survived floods stay at a temporary shelters set up for displaced people at Makile graveyard in Thatta northern Pakistan, Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010.
  • 15. A girl carries firewood in a Pakistani army-run relief camp in Sehwan, in the Sindh province, on September 15, 2010. The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the World Food Programme (WFP) have announced that they are to join forces to address Pakistan's food shortage emergency following floods that ravaged 10 percent of the country's crops. Pakistan's worst-ever floods have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide and vulnerable to hunger and malnutrition. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, leaving more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 16. SEHWAN SHARIF, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 15: Flood victims make their way through a Pakistan Army run flood relief camp on September 15, 2010 on the outskirts of Sehwan Sharif in the Jamshoro District of Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 17. Getty Images - SEHWAN SHARIF, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 16: A girl, displaced by flooding, looks over a Pakistan Army run flood relief camp on September 16, 2010 on the outskirts of Sehwan Sharif in the Jamshoro District of Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water..
  • 18. Getty Images - Pakistanis displaced by floods prepare food outside their tents at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010. The head of the UN refugee agency on September 16 urged the world to do far more to help Pakistan recover from catastrophic floods that hit millions, on the eve of a major new UN appeal. Pakistan's worst floods in history have affected up to 21 million people and left 10 million without shelter. More than eight million people are reliant on aid handouts just to survive.
  • 19. Getty Images Pakistanis affected by floods stand near their damaged house in Wadi Therhi village on September 16, 2010.
  • 20. Getty Images A Pakistani soldier provides water to displaced flood affected victims at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010. Getty Images A Pakistani child displaced by floods eats bread outside a tent at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010.
  • 21. Getty Images Pakistanis displaced by floods arrive to get water provide by soldiers at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010.
  • 22. Getty Images A Pakistani woman displaced by floods prepares food for her family at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010.
  • 23. Getty Images Flood affected residents carry their belongings as they prepare to board a Pakistani navy rescue helicopter evacuating them from Faridabad to safer ground in Khanpor Kali Mori on September 16, 2010
  • 24. Getty Images - Pakistani soldiers provide water to displaced flood affected Pakistanis at a makeshift camp in Sehwan on September 16, 2010.
  • 25. AP Photo - A Pakistani child who survived floods searches for drinking water in a camp setup for displaced people in Nowshera, Pakistan, Thursday Sept. 16, 2010. Over 20 million people are affected and displaced by heavy flooding in Pakistan.
  • 26. An old Pakistani man is carried towards a Pakistan Navy helicopter as they are evacuated to higher grounds at Fareedabad, Dadu district, southern Pakistan on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2010. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) Getty Images - A flood affected Pakistani victim carries his elderly mother as he steps down from a Pakistan's navy rescue helicopter in Khanpor Kali Mori, Sindh province on September 16, 2010. The head of the UN refugee agency on September 16 urged the world to do far more to help Pakistan recover from catastrophic floods that hit millions, on the eve of a major new UN appeal. Pakistan's worst floods in history have affected up to 21 million people and left 10 million without shelter. More than eight million people are reliant on aid handouts just to survive.
  • 27. Pakistanis trapped by floodwaters wave to a Pakistan Navy helicopter at Fareedabad, Dadu district, southern Pakistan on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2010. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • 28. A narrow strip of land serves as refuge near Khairpur Nathan Shah town in Sindh province, surrounded by floods, on September 14, 2010. A US official is quoted saying the United Nations will raise an emergency appeal to support flood-ravaged Pakistan, despite concerns that an initial call to donors has fallen short. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 29. Pakistani children living in the town of Faridabad, cutoff by surrounding flood waters, climb a tree to watch a navy helicopter evacuating residents to safer ground in Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 14, 2010. A US official is quoted as saying the United Nations will raise an emergency appeal to support flood-ravaged Pakistan, despite concerns that an initial call to donors has fallen short. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 30. An elderly Pakistani man sits aboard a navy helicopter as he is evacuated to safer ground from Faridabad, cutoff by surrounding flood waters, in Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 14, 2010. A US official is quoted as saying the United Nations will raise an emergency appeal to support flood-ravaged Pakistan, despite concerns that an initial call to donors has fallen short. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 31. KHAIRPUR NATHAN SHAH, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 14: A flood victim stands on his rooftop during relief operations by the Pakistan Army on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 32. Getty Images - Pakistanis displaced by floods are seen in their tents at a makeshift camp in Sehwan town, Sindh province, on September 14, 2010. The floods inundated vast swathes of Pakistan and killed 1,760 people but disaster officials have said the number of deaths is likely to rise 'significantly' when the missing are accounted for. Advancing floodwaters continue to threaten parts of Sindh province, with 19 of its 23 districts deluged and 2.8 million people displaced, according to provincial authorities.
  • 33. Getty Images - A Pakistani navy soldier rescues a victim of the flood in Khanpor Kali Mori, Sindh province on September 14, 2010. The floods inundated vast swathes of Pakistan and killed 1,760 people but disaster officials have said the number of deaths is likely to rise 'significantly' when the missing are accounted for. Advancing floodwaters continue to threaten parts of Sindh province, with 19 of its 23 districts deluged and 2.8 million people displaced, according to provincial authorities.
  • 34. Getty Images This aerial view shows a flooded area of Dadu in southern Sindh province on September 14, 2010.
  • 35. Getty Images This view taken from a Pakistani helicopter shows the flooded area of Dadu in southern Sindh province on September 14, 2010.
  • 36. Getty Images - A Pakistani barber cuts hair of a flood-affected victim at a makeshift camp in Sehwan town, Sindh province, on September 14, 2010.
  • 37. AP Photo - Trapped Pakistani villagers walk towards a Pakistan Navy helicopter as they flee to higher grounds at Fareedabad, Dadu district, southern Pakistan on Wednesday Sept. 15, 2010. The U.S. special envoy to Pakistan sought to highlight Washington's aid efforts Wednesday during his first visit since massive floods devastated one of America's most important allies in the war against militancy.
  • 38. AP Photo - A Pakistani man takes shelter underneath a rope bed at a camp for people displaced by floods in Dadu district, southern Pakistan on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2010. Getty Images - Pakistanis displaced by floods carry relief goods boxes dropped by an UN helicopter on a damaged road in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
  • 39. AP Photo - In this aerial view from a Pakistan Navy helicopter, flood submerged Fareedabad, Dadu district, southern Pakistan on Wednesday Sept. 15, 2010. The U.S. special envoy to Pakistan sought to highlight Washington's aid efforts Wednesday during his first visit since massive floods devastated one of America's most important allies in the war against militancy.
  • 40. Getty Images A girl carries firewood in a Pakistani army-run relief camp in Sehwan, in the Sindh province, on September 15, 2010.
  • 41.   Getty Images Pakistani flood affected victims sit with their belongings surrounded by floodwaters in Bajara village, in the Sindh province, on September 15, 2010.
  • 42. Getty Images - SEHWAN SHARIF, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 15: A young girl, displaced by flooding, sits in front of her families temporary shelter in a Pakistan Army run flood relief camp on September 15, 2010 on the outskirts of Sehwan Sharif in the Jamshoro District of Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 43. Reuters Pictures - Umar 2, a flood victim, sits outside their family tent while taking refuge at a makeshift relief camp in Nowshera, in Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 15, 2010. The floods are Pakistan's worst-ever natural disaster in terms of damage, with at least 6 million people forced from their homes and 20 million people affected. The disaster has killed more than 1,750 people, and aid agencies have warned that millions are at risk of death if emergency food and shelter are not quickly provided.
  • 44. Getty Images - Pakistani flood affected victims receive relief goods in Bajara village, in the Sindh province on September 15, 2010. Pakistan's worst-ever floods have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide and vulnerable to hunger and malnutrition. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, leaving more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival.
  • 45.   Getty Images Pakistani flood affected victims load relief goods in their boats in Bajara, in the Sindh province on September 15, 2010.
  • 46. Reuters Pictures - A father places his hand on his 7-year-old son, Abrar, who is suffering from typhoid, while taking refuge at a camp for flood victims in Nowshera, in Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 15, 2010. The floods are Pakistan's worst-ever natural disaster in terms of damage, with at least 6 million people forced from their homes and 20 million people affected. The disaster has killed more than 1,750 people, and aid agencies have warned that millions are at risk of death if emergency food and shelter are not quickly provided.
  • 47. Getty Images - KHAIRPUR NATHAN SHAH, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 14: Flood victims signal from their rooftop towards a Pakistan Army helicopter during food relief operations on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 48.   Getty Images - KHAIRPUR NATHAN SHAH, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 14: A flood victim signals from his rooftop towards a Pakistan Army helicopter showing where to drop aid during food relief operations on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 49.   Getty Images - KHAIRPUR NATHAN SHAH, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 14: Flood victims wave from their rooftop towards a Pakistan Army helicopter during food relief operations on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 50. Getty Images - KHAIRPUR NATHAN SHAH, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 14: Flood victims wave from their rooftop towards a Pakistan Army helicopter during food relief operations on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 51. DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 52. AP Photo Pakistani girls scale a wall at a camp for people displaced by floods in Sukkur, Sindh province, southern Pakistan, Monday, Sept. 13, 2010.
  • 53. AP Photo A Pakistani flood affected woman looks at a camp for people displaced by floods in Sukkur, Sindh province, south Pakistan Monday Sept. 13, 2010.
  • 54. Getty Images - DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims scramble for food rations, dropped by Pakistan Army soldiers, as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 55. KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims sit in a SeaKing Navy helicopter as they are evacuated from their flood surrounded village during evacuation operations by the Pakistan Navy on September 13, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 56. Getty Images - An UN helicopter drops relief goods boxes to Pakistanis displaced by floods on higher ground in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
  • 57. AP Photo Pakistanis wait for distribution of food at a camp for people displaced by floods in Sukkur, Sindh province, southern Pakistan on Monday Sept. 13, 2010
  • 58. KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: Flood victims scramble to get limited seats on a SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
  • 59. Getty Images DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 on the Suprio bund near to the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 60. Getty Images - A flood victim appeals for help as Pakistani army personnel drop aid from a helicopter near Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 13, 2010. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, with more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival. Advancing floodwaters continue to threaten parts of Sindh province, with 19 of its 23 districts deluged and 2.8 million people displaced, according to provincial authorities.
  • 61. Getty Images KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims line up to for limited seats on a SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 13, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 62. Getty Images DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Birds fly over a flood engulfed village during relief operations by the Pakistan Army on September 13, 2010 near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 63. Getty Images Seen from a Pakistan army rescue helicopter, a town is surrounded by flood waters near Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 13, 2010. Some 21 million people have been affected by the floods, which began more than six weeks ago, with more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival. Advancing floodwaters continue to threaten parts of Sindh province, with 19 of its 23 districts deluged and 2.8 million people displaced, according to provincial authorities.
  • 64. Getty Images DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: Flood victims scramble for food rations, dropped by Pakistan Army soldiers during relief operations on September 13, 2010 near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 65. Getty Images - KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: Flood victims sit in an overcrowded SeaKing Navy helicopter after being evacuated from their flood engulfed village during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
  • 66. Getty Images - KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: Flood victims look out of an overcrowded SeaKing Navy helicopter after being evacuated from their flood engulfed village during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 67. Getty Images - KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: Flood victims scramble to get limited seats on a SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 68. Getty Images - DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: A flood victim is assisted off a SeaKing Navy helicopter by A Pakistan Navy soldier after being evacuated from their flood surrounded village of Faridabad during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Khanpur, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 69. Getty Images - KHANPUR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: A village engulfed by flood waters is seen from a SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 near to the village of SB Bund, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 70. Getty Images - DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: Flood victims, are assisted off a hovercraft, after being evacuated by Pakistan Navy soldiers from their flooded villages on September 12, 2010 in the village of Kalimuri, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 71. Getty Images - DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: A flood victim, evacuated by Pakistan Navy soldiers from her families flooded village, carries water at a relief camp on September 12, 2010 in the village of Kalimuri, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 72. Getty Images - DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 12: A flood victim, evacuated by Pakistan Navy soldiers from their flooded village, carries water at a relief camp on September 12, 2010 in the village of Kalimuri, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan.
  • 73. Reuters Pictures - Pakistani Army Chief Ashfaq Parvez Kayani (2nd L) talks to Australian doctors at their field hospital set-up for flood victims at Kot Addu in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 12, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago, Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy.
  • 74. Getty Images - A Pakistani woman displaced by floods prepares her daughter in a tent to celebrate Eid al-Fitr during the first day of the religious festival at a makeshift camp on the outskirts of Karachi on September 11, 2010. Muslims in Pakistan were celebrating Eid al-Fitr festival with simplicity and sobriety as millions continued to suffer from misery unfolded by worst-ever floods. The devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide, according to UN figures, with UN spokesman Maurizio Giuliano describing it as 'one of the worst humanitarian disasters in UN history'.
  • 75. Getty Images - A Pakistani girl displaced by floods wearing bangles and sunglasses poses outside a tent as she celebrates Eid al-Fitr during the first day of the religious festival at a makeshift camp on the outskirts of Karachi on September 11, 2010
  • 76. Getty Images - An ailing, internally-displaced Pakistani woman sleeps on the side of a road as Muslims celebrate Eid Al-Fitr in Sukkur on September 11, 2010. Pakistani Muslims took part in low-key celebrations for the Eid al-Fitr festival on September 11, as millions still languish without shelter after the nation's worst-ever floods. Eid is the most important festival in the Islamic calendar--marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan--but celebrations were muted on September 11, as the fallout from devastating floods continues. The deluges have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide, according to UN figures, with UN spokesman Maurizio Giuliano describing it as 'one of the worst humanitarian disasters in UN history.'
  • 77. A Pakistani flood victim lies across school desks as he shelters in a school which has been converted to a relief camp in Dadu, Sindh Province on September 11, 2010. Pakistani Muslims took part in low-key celebrations to mark the Eid al-Fitr festival, as millions still languished without shelter after the nation's worst-ever floods. TOPSHOTS / AFP PHOTO / Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 78. An internally-displaced Pakistani toddler plays on the ground as people celebrate Eid Al-Fitr at a camp in Sukkur on September 11, 2010. Pakistani Muslims took part in low-key celebrations for the Eid al-Fitr festival on September 11, as millions still languish without shelter after the nation's worst-ever floods. Eid is the most important festival in the Islamic calendar--marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan--but celebrations were muted on September 11, as the fallout from devastating floods continues. The deluges have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide, according to UN figures, with UN spokesman Maurizio Giuliano describing it as "one of the worst humanitarian disasters in UN history." TOPSHOTS / AFP PHOTO / ADEK BERRY (Photo credit ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 79. DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 11: Flood victims walk with their belongings toward a navy craft in hopes of being evacuated from their flood destroyed village on September 11, 2010 near to the village of Kalimuri, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six-weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
  • 80. Getty Images - An UN helicopter drops relief goods boxes to Pakistanis displaced by floods on higher ground in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
  • 81. Getty Images - United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos looks through a window from a UN helicopter, flying over the flood-affected area in Thul, in the southern province of Sindh, on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
  • 82. Getty Images - An Internally displaced Pakistani young boy from Jacobabad shepherds camels next to a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
  • 83. Getty Images - An Internally displaced Pakistani infant sleeps on the floor at a camp in Sukkur on September 7, 2010. The world must help Pakistan rebuild homes and livelihoods destroyed by devastating floods to secure hearts and minds in the militant-hit nation, the UNDP's regional head told AFP. Global cash pledges have been slow in coming to bolster rescue and relief efforts ongoing in the flood-damaged nuclear nation, where more than 21 million people have been affected by a month of monsoon-triggered floods.
  • 84. Getty Images - An internally displaced Pakistani woman tends to her child at a hospital in Sukkur on September 7, 2010. The world must help Pakistan rebuild homes and livelihoods destroyed by devastating floods to secure hearts and minds in the militant-hit nation, the UNDP's regional head told AFP. Global cash pledges have been slow in coming to bolster rescue and relief efforts ongoing in the flood-damaged nuclear nation, where more than 21 million people have been affected by a month of monsoon-triggered floods.
  • 85. Getty Images Internally displaced children receive medical treatments at a hospital in Sukkur on September 7, 2010.
  • 86. Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani child receives medical treatment at a temporary hospital supported by charity group Islamic Help in Sukkur on September 7, 2010.
  • 87. Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani women tend to their children at a hospital in Sukkur on September 7, 2010.
  • 88. A list of humanitarian organisations that are accepting cash donations for flood response efforts in Pakistan can be found at http:// www .interaction. org / crisis - list /interaction- members - respond - floods - pakistan You can also contribute to flood relief in Pakistan through one of these organizations (listed in alphabetical order): APPNA Central Asia Institute The Citizens Foundation Developments in Literacy Doctors of The World Edhi Foundation Human Development Foundation Humanity First   Let’s be HUMAN and not ONLY Human beings… Be generous DONATE to help those in need … IMANA Islamic Relief USA Medecins sans Frontiere Relief International Red Cross Pakistan UNHCR SHINE Humanity UNICEF
  • 89. Help to save children in need – DONATE A presentation by Nubia Nubia _group@ yahoo . fr