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Isra literacy 2.0 keynote

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Keynote from September 2011 conference.

Keynote from September 2011 conference.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • “ Does it work?” None of us likes to think of ourselves as getting older. But the bewildered question of an adolescent who is flummoxed by the sight of an object us old people take for granted certainly makes us feel old. What lead up to this question requires a bit of context. Nancy was scheduled to speak to a group of school principals in a nearby community. It has become our practice to include students from the high school where we work in our presentations, whenever possible, in order to introduce student perspectives to the audience. Three tenth grade students, Coraima, Susana, and Mariana, accompanied Nancy to this presentation because she has known them since kindergarten. The girls participated in a unique project that involved looping with the same classmates and teachers from K-5 (Grove, 2005) so they had a deep sense of the kinds of supports they received during their early schooling years. As the four of them entered the room where the professional development meeting would take place, the girls stopped and let out an audible gasp. “ Does it work?” asked Coraima. Nancy looked to the front of the room to see what Coraima was referring to, and then silently contemplated her own mortality. Coraima was referring to the chalkboard. Given that there was a piece of chalk in the tray, Nancy was able to answer in the affirmative. She watched as the three teenagers approached the board and took turns making tentative marks with the chalk. “It’s soft,” said Mariana. Nancy realized at that moment that the girls had never had a chalkboard in their classrooms, only whiteboards and dry erase markers. More recently, they have become acquainted with interactive smart boards and document cameras. Their only experiences with chalk were of the sidewalk variety, where the rough surface requires more pressure and a firmer stroke. And as members of a digital generation, their syntax reflected a world view of communication tools as active, not passive.
  • Considering all the advances that have occurred in the last 115 years, it is disturbing that education has changed so little. Beyond the superficial alterations, much remains the same. The teacher stands in front of the room, lecturing about content the students are supposed to know, while students are supposed to passively absorb all the information. In fact, that’s an even more ancient belief—John Locke first forwarded the notion of tabula rasa (blank slate) in 1690.
  • In English, students chose a worthy cause and established a Facebook page with information about it. A goal was to get at least 20 people to “Like” it. This provided great feedback to students, especially when asked for more information. Students were able to continue to refine their pages based on what others were commenting on. This assignment was the creative component for the question. Students also wrote a formal essay in response to the question. The next slides are examples from this portion of the assignment.
  • This was the schoolwide essential question for 9 weeks.
  • This standards are listed in the handout.
  • http://visualthesaurus.com FOUNDER BEN ZIMMER is new columnist for the On Language column at the NY TImes
  • “ A Cotton Plantation on the Mississippi” was made from a painting by William Aiken Walker. This artist did many scenes around New Orleans, William Aiken Walker was born into aristocracy as the son of a prominent cotton agent in Charleston, SC. He served in the Confederate Army under General Wade Hampton's South Carolina Brigade until he was wounded.
  • The partnership allows the students and teachers using Glogster EDU - now more than 450,000 around the world - to share their Glogs using the popular SchoolTube sharing site, and also allows them to easily import multimedia elements found on the SchoolTube site into their Glogs. All student-created materials on SchoolTube must be approved by registered teachers, follow local school guidelines, and adhere to the company’s high standards. This partnership reflects Glogster EDU’s tremendous growth as an important education tool for teachers of any subject.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Literacy 2.0 Nancy Frey www.fisherandfrey.com
    • 2.  
    • 3. “ Does it work?”
    • 4.  
    • 5.
      • Texted their friends
      • Updated Facebook status
      • Made a dance video
      • Uploaded it to YouTube
    • 6. Wait… * Thanks, Heidi Hayes Jacobs! … isn’t the 21st century 11% over?*
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9. Medieval Help Desk
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQHX-SjgQvQ
    • 10.  
    • 11.  
    • 12.  
    • 13.  
    • 14.  
    • 15. Burn Journals Movie Trailer in English
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkVtzoeN1-U
    • 16.  
    • 17. 64% of teens with cell phones have sent a text while in class Source: Pew Charitable Trust’s Research on the Internet and American Life Project, 2010
    • 18. 65% of cell phone-owning teens at schools that completely ban phones bring their phones to school every day . Source: Pew Charitable Trust’s Research on the Internet and American Life Project, 2010
    • 19. Source: Pew Charitable Trust’s Research on the Internet and American Life Project, 2010 58% of cell phone owning teens at schools that ban phones have sent a text message during class .
    • 20. 25% have made or received a call during class time . Source: Pew Charitable Trust’s Research on the Internet and American Life Project, 2010
    • 21. Teens from low-income families are much more likely than their peers to use a cell phone to access information on the Internet. Source: Pew Charitable Trust’s Research on the Internet and American Life Project, 2010
    • 22. Two-thirds of children ages 4-7 have used an iPhone or iPod Touch. Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, 2011
    • 23. 19% of 2-5 year olds can operate a smartphone application.
    • 24. 19% of 2-5 year olds can operate a smartphone application. Only 9% can tie their own shoes.
    • 25. Here are your future students.
    • 26.
      • A conversation with digital natives
      • http://www.schooltube.com/video/71749c9dce554a87aa22/Hope-for-Technology-A-conversation-with-Digital-Natives
    • 27. Literacy 2.0 represents a shift , not a replacement .
    • 28. Finding Using Producing Sharing information
    • 29. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Develop proficiency with the tools of technology . p. 2
    • 30. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally.
    • 31. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes.
    • 32. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information.
    • 33. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Create, critique, and evaluate multi-media texts .
    • 34. National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association 2009 position statement on 21st century readers and writers: Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments.
    • 35. Indiana is the first state to add an online course requirement for graduation.
    • 36. Emphasize functions , not tools Google, Bing, Apps Flash drives, e-books Texting, FourSquare YouTube, vlogs wikis, VoiceThread podcasts, Hulu Comic Life, Voki, Glogster Keynote, Webinars Facebook, MySpace p. 8
    • 37. Emphasize functions , not tools Searching Storing Communicating Sharing Collaborating Listening & Viewing Producing Presenting Networking Google, Bing, Apps Flash drives, e-books Texting, FourSquare YouTube, vlogs wikis, VoiceThread podcasts, Hulu Comic Life, Voki, Glogster Keynote, Webinars Facebook, MySpace p. 8
    • 38. Finding Information: The Eternal Search
    • 39. Information is easily accessible
    • 40. Three-dimensional Reading p. 36
    • 41. Too many links leave some readers unable to see the forest.
    • 42.  
    • 43.  
    • 44. Teach Boolean Search Operators
      • Quotation marks
      • Plus sign between words
      • OR
      • AND
      • NOT
      p. 39
    • 45. Visual Thesaurus
    • 46. Students may use ineffective techniques for searching “ Save the Northwest Tree Octopus ” http://www.zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/
    • 47. Bookmark fact-checking websites
    • 48. Using Information: Making Responsible Choices
    • 49. Critical literacy requires students to: Question the Commonplace Consider the Role of the Author Seek Alternate Perspectives Read Critically p. 51
    • 50. Liberty is always unfinished business…
    • 51. A call to action p. 57
    • 52. “ A Cotton Plantation in Mississippi” by William Aiken Walker
    • 53.  
    • 54. National Archives Online Analysis Tools
      • Other Tools:
      • cartoon
      • written document
      • artifact
      • map
      • motion picture
      • poster
      • sound recording
    • 55. Producing and Sharing Information
    • 56. WOW at Northview (MI) High School Created by Tricia Erickson’s Art and Technology Students
    • 57.  
    • 58.  
    • 59.  
    • 60.  
    • 61.  
    • 62.
      • http://pediapress.com/
      Wikipedia Book Tool
    • 63. http://chocolulu.glogster.com/maslow-/?voucher=1ff537a398643fd67db94a1279e41d2f
    • 64. Can embed video, music, and podcasts into the Glog
    • 65. Create a voki for your classroom.
    • 66. Present Tense and Future Tensions
    • 67.
      • Aligning curriculum, instruction, and policy to support learning in a new century.
      The Challenge
    • 68. Courtesy Policy at HSHMC p.112
    • 69. Different Readers, Different Texts, Many Literacies. Be a part of the conversation.
    • 70. Shape technology policies in your school, district, and state to support your Literacy 2.0 efforts.
    • 71. The Takeaway Students and teachers search for, use, create. and share information using principles of multiliteracies, critical literacies, and visual literacy. Continued growth in technology strains school and district technology policies. The F2F and virtual networks we foster for ourselves are our best support!
    • 72. HSHMC in Three Words
    • 73. What will your three words be?
    • 74. www.fisherandfrey.com

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