Roger Martin and Integrative Thinking

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This is a presentation on Roger Martin and his theory of Integrative Thinking. It addresses the key concepts and gives a brief explanation of the process and framework.

Sources used and cited: Harvard Business Review and The Opposable Mind (by Roger Martin).

Published in: Business, Technology

Roger Martin and Integrative Thinking

  1. 1. Integrative ThinkingRoger Martin17 JULY 2012 *Image Source: The Opposable Mind, by Roger Martin
  2. 2. F. ScottFitzgerald“The test of first-rate intelligence isthe ability to hold two opposing ideasin mind at the same time and stillretain the ability to function...”
  3. 3. Characteristics Integrative ThinkingSalience - the conventional approach is to discard as many as possible –or not even to consider some of them in the first place. In order toreduce our exposure to uncomfortable complexity, we filter out salientfeatures when considering an issue. We also do this because of howmost organizations are structured. Each functional specialty has its ownnarrow view of what merits consideration. *Source: How Successful Leaders Think, by Roger Martin, HBR June 2007
  4. 4. Characteristics Integrative ThinkingCausality - In the second step of decision making,you analyze how thenumerous salient factors relate to one another. Conventional thinkerstend to take the same narrow view of causality that they do of salience.The simplest type of all is a straight-line causal relationship. Theintegrative thinker isn’t afraid to question the validity of apparentlyobvious links or to consider multidirectional and nonlinear relationships. *Source: How Successful Leaders Think, by Roger Martin, HBR June 2007
  5. 5. Characteristics Integrative ThinkingArchitecture - The order in which you make these decisions will affect theoutcome. Integrative Thinkers don’t break down a problem intoindependent pieces and work on them separately or in a certain order.They see the entire architecture of the problem – how the various partsof it fit together, how one decision will affect another. Just as important,they hold all of those pieces suspended in their minds at once. *Source: How Successful Leaders Think, by Roger Martin, HBR June 2007
  6. 6. Characteristics Integrative ThinkingResolution - All of these stages – determining what is salient, analyzingthe causal relationships between the salient factors, examining thearchitecture of the problem – lead to an outcome. Too often, we acceptan unpleasant trade-off with relatively little complaint, since it appearsto be the best alternative. When a satisfactory outcome does emerge,though, it is inevitably due to the leader’s refusal to accept trade-offsand conventional options. *Source: How Successful Leaders Think, by Roger Martin, HBR June 2007
  7. 7. Integrative ThinkingSalience - what features do I see as important?Causality - how do I make sense of what I see?Architecture - what tasks will I do in what order?Resolution - how will I know when I am done? *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p.29
  8. 8. Integrative Thinking Resolution - how will I know when I am done? Architecture - what tasks will I do in what order? Causality - how do I make sense of what I see?Salience- what features do I see as important? *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p.29
  9. 9. Think DifferentConventional vs. Integrative*Source: How Successful Leaders Think, by Roger Martin, HBR June 2007
  10. 10. Integrative Thinkers“The integrative thinkers I interviewed have learnedto change their factory settings and distinguishbetween reality and models that purport to reflectreality.” *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin p. 56
  11. 11. Knowledge SystemStance Tools Experiences *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 93-98
  12. 12. Knowledge System Stance Tools ExperiencesStance is how you see the world around you,but it’s also how you see yourself in thatworld. *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 93-98
  13. 13. Knowledge System Stance Tools ExperiencesTools range from formal theories to establishedprocesses to rules of thumb. Your stance guideswhat tools you choose to accumulate. *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 93-98
  14. 14. Knowledge System Stance Tools ExperiencesThe experiences you accumulate are the productof your stance and tools, which guide youtoward some experiences and away from others. *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 93-98
  15. 15. Knowledge Model GuidesStance Guides Tools Experiences *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 103
  16. 16. Knowledge Model GuidesStance Guides Tools Informs Experiences Informs *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 103
  17. 17. Knowledge Model Guides Stance•Who am I in the world Guides and what am I trying to accomplish? Tools Informs Experiences Informs *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 103
  18. 18. Knowledge Model Guides Stance•Who am I in the world Guides and what am I trying to accomplish? Tools Informs •With what tools and models do I organize my thinking and understand the world? Experiences Informs *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 103
  19. 19. Knowledge Model Guides Stance•Who am I in the world Guides and what am I trying to accomplish? Tools Informs •With what tools and models do I organize my thinking and understand the world? Experiences Informs •With what experiences can I build my repertoire of sensitivities and skills? *Source: The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin, p. 103

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