Vocabulary and Adolescent Literacy<br />Strategies for All Middle and High School Learners<br />June 29, 2010<br />
Welcome<br />
Agenda<br />
Shared Language Activity<br />
What is Literacy?<br />The ability to communicate through a wide variety of media<br />Visual<br />Auditory<br />Oral<br /...
Shared Language Activity<br />
Caught in the Crossfire<br />
Shared Language Activity<br />
Food for Thought<br />
dominance hierarchy<br />dominant gene<br />dormancy<br />dorsal<br />double helix<br />double pan balance<br />drug<br />...
Misconceptions about Teaching Vocabulary<br />
What does work?<br />
How Many Terms?<br />Prioritize<br />Categorize<br />Choose Key Vocabulary or Key Terms<br />
Marzano’s Five Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />
Marzano’s Five Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a brief explanation or description of the new term or...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a non-linguistic representation of the new term or ph...
Images<br />
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Ask students to generate their own explanations or descriptions of the term...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />4.  Ask students to create their own nonlinguistic representation of the te...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />5.  Periodically ask students to review the accuracy of their explanations ...
Goals of Marzano-Style Word Walls<br />
Pre-Assessment and Activating Strategies<br />Brain Dump<br />Knowledge Rating<br />Alphabet Boxes<br />Word Walls<br />St...
Brain Dump<br />
Getting Started<br />Low-risk activity<br />Allows students to become imparters of knowledge<br />Takes little instruction...
Knowledge Rating<br />
As a Pre-Assessment<br />
As a Review<br />
Knowledge Rating<br />
The Research Tells Us…<br />
Stumpers<br />Designed to give students ownership over vocabulary instruction<br />Students become experts <br />Goal:  Di...
How to Use Stumpers<br />Students choose 2-3 “stumper” words in their reading.<br />Students…<br />write the word in conte...
Variations<br />Provide a picture/image of the word<br />Create a personal dictionary of stumpers throughout the semester<...
Alphabet Boxes<br />Another modification of word walls<br />Designed to provide students with ownership over their learnin...
Alphabet Boxes<br />
Variations<br />
Stoplight Strategy<br />
Stoplight Strategy<br />Can serve as a preview of review of material<br />
What teachers said…<br />“I used stoplight as an post-test activity. As soon as students handed in their tests, I had them...
Lesson Writer<br />
Lesson Writer<br />
Admit Slips<br />
Admit Slips<br />Give students a short “challenge” as homework.  <br />For example, students might receive a very short re...
Admit Slips<br />Students work in small groups to discuss their predictions and questions, then compile everything into a ...
Admit Slips<br />
Comprehension Strategies<br />Inner/Outer Circle<br />Admit Slips<br />Online Flashcards<br />QAR<br />Who would say it?<b...
Inner/Outer Circle<br />
Inner/Outer Circle<br />
<ul><li>Study without logging in
Registration requires email
Print, export, image/audio cards require paid membership ($20)
Create own card sets or search</li></li></ul><li>
<ul><li>Study without logging in
Create login without email
Can export, share, print
Study and quiz
Create own card sets or search</li></li></ul><li>Q(uestion) A(nswer) R(elationship)<br />Literacy strategy<br />Students c...
Types of Questions<br />
Types of Questions<br />
:)<br />
What do you do?<br />Read the passage and answer the question<br />List everything you did to read and understand the pass...
Metacognition Activity<br />Loitering with a vacant eye<br />Along the Grecian gallery,<br />And brooding on my heavy ill,...
Adolescent Reading Model<br />Language Comprehension<br />Word Recognition<br />Executive Processes<br />• Background Know...
Metacognition Activity<br />Loitering with a vacant eye<br />Along the Grecian gallery,<br />And brooding on my heavy ill,...
Some guiding questions….<br />What are some of the strategies you use to learn new information?<br />How did you learn the...
Content<br />Skills<br />Strategies<br />Knowledge of the  world<br />Rules and procedures<br />Guidelines related <br />t...
Content<br />Skills<br />Strategies<br />
So….<br />  How do we teach learning strategies to students?<br />
Instructional MethodologyMODELING is a MUST!<br />
Who would say it?<br />
Who would say it?<br />
Who would say it?<br />Traditional Elements<br />Word<br />Dictionary Definition<br />Definition in Students Own Words<br ...
Variations<br />
Break it Down and Solve it<br />Math Strategy <br />Adapt for any content that uses math<br />Students<br />Connect new kn...
Break it Down and Solve it<br />Variations<br />Work with a partner<br />Explain verbally to someone how the student solve...
We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge.” 					   – John NaisbittHow do you see this statement as a reali...
Animoto<br />
WordAhead<br />
Did you know?<br />
The LINCS Vocabulary Strategy<br />Word<br />Reminding<br />Word<br />LINCing<br />Story<br />LINCing <br />Picture<br />D...
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
Term<br />1<br />LINCing Picture<br />5<br />2<br />LINCing Story<br />Definition<br />4<br />3<br />Reminding Word<br />T...
A Good REMINDING WORD always…<br />Sounds like part or all of the new word.<br />Is a real word.<br />Has a meaning that y...
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
A Good LINCing Story always….<br />
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
A Good LINCing Picture always...<br /><ul><li>Contains a part related to the Reminding Word
Contains parts related to the important ideas in the definition.
Helps you remember the new term’s definition.</li></li></ul><li>1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansa...
LINCS Strategy<br />Step 1:  List the parts<br />Step 2:  Identify a Reminding Word<br />Step 3:  Note a LINCing Story<br ...
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br /...
Let’s Practice<br />
Creating LINCS Study Cards<br />Write the word to be learned on the top half of one side. Then circle it.<br />Write the p...
Creating LINCS Study Cards<br />Write the Reminding Word on the bottom half of the first side. Write the LINCing Story on ...
The LINCing Routine<br />	Transforms potentially weak linksbetween a wordand its definitioninto a chainof strong links<br />
:)<br />
Break<br />Back to Theory<br />
Metacognitive Questions<br />
The Research Tells Us…<br />
Did you know that…<br />Knowledge of vocabulary is one of the best predictors of success in all school subjects?<br />The ...
Organizational Resources<br />Two-Column Charts<br />Adding Labels<br />Frayer Model <br />The Lotus<br />Affinity Diagram...
Lexipedia<br />
Visuwords<br />
Organizational Resources<br />Two-Column Charts<br />Adding Labels<br />Frayer Model <br />The Lotus<br />Affinity Diagram...
Model I<br />Students provide a definition, list characteristics, and provide examples and non-examples of the concept. <b...
Model II<br />Includes a definition<br />Omits non-essential characteristics<br />
Frayer Model<br />Students will:<br />develop understanding of key concepts and vocabulary<br />draw on prior knowledge to...
Lotus Diagram<br />Analytical, organizational tool for breaking broad topics into components, which can then be further or...
Lotus Diagram<br />Keeps students from becoming overwhelmed<br />Provides an outline for students to expand their thinking...
Graphic Organizers<br />More graphicorganizer links<br />
Question for You<br />How did you learn the skill of note               taking?<br />How did this skill contribute to your...
Interactive Notes<br />Help students read and interpret informational or literary texts<br />Guide students through the re...
Customizable Printables<br />
Note Taking and Summarizing Strategies<br />GIST<br />Cornell Notes/Q-Notes<br />Break it Down and Solve it<br />Wordle<br...
What happens when you ask students to provide a summary?<br />GIST:  Sheltered Instructional Strategy<br />Summarizing<br ...
GIST<br />Read the passage – “The Underground Railroad”<br />Highlight or Underline what you think are the ten most import...
GIST:  Summarizing Strategy<br />Helps students separate main ideas from supporting details<br />Keeps summaries short and...
Note Taking and Summarizing Strategies<br />GIST<br />Interactive Notes<br />Cornell Notes/Q-Notes<br />Break it Down and ...
Why Cornell Notes?<br />Cornell note taking stimulates critical thinking skills.<br />Note taking helps students remember ...
First & Last Name<br />Class Title<br />Period<br />Date<br />Topic<br />Questions,<br />Subtitles,<br />Headings,<br />Et...
Subject:   <br />Why take Cornell notes?<br />                                  Date: 1/2/09<br />P<br />R<br />O<br />C<b...
<ul><li>Summary is added at the end of ALL 	note pages on the subject
Summary added AFTER questions</li></ul>are answered<br /><ul><li>Summary should respond to the problem or questions stated...
Example <br />(Diagram copied <br />during lecture)<br />(Questions about it )<br /><ul><li>How do the ticks find the cattle?
Why don’t the ticks usually kill their host?
How could tick infestations in cattle impact humans?</li></li></ul><li>Anthropods<br />Ninth<br />Grade<br />Biology<br />...
Great things about Cornell Notes<br />Clearly incorporates Essential Questions<br />Students devise their own answers base...
Online Dictionaries<br />
Wordle<br />
Sonnet 116<br />Let me not to the marriage of true minds<br />Admit impediments. Love is not love<br />Which alters when i...
FIT Sheet<br />Three Steps to Better Comprehension<br />Fact<br />Interpretation <br />Tie-In<br />Instrument to assess re...
FIT Sheet<br />Facts -  Be careful what you choose – it must be open to interpretation.<br />Interpretation – Difficult fo...
Closure Strategies<br />+ Δ ?<br />The Important Thing…<br />Ticket out the Door<br />3-2-1<br />Capture your Thoughts<br />
Formative Assessment<br />Important part of designing lessons<br />Takes place constantly and consistently with great teac...
+ Δ ?<br />Students have an opportunity to share what they …<br />+ – found clear, good, fun, interesting<br />Δ – found c...
The Important Thing<br />Student Choice and/or Teacher Choice<br />If students cannot complete the response, gaps in their...
Ticket out the Door<br />Flexible<br />Daily<br />General or Specific<br />Ticket out the Door<br />
3-2-1<br />3 reasons for global warming<br />2 ways to improve the quality of our air in Hickory<br />1 thing you can do a...
Capture Your Thoughts<br />A great culminating assignment<br />Conceptual<br />Allows for maximum student input<br />Captu...
Impact<br />
Creating a Lesson Using Literacy and Vocabulary Strategies<br />
Brain Dump<br />
Previewing<br />Scan “The History of Chocolate” – are there words that need to be defined?<br />
Vocabulary<br />Winnowing:  The process of removing the shell of the bean.  In chocolate making, this process is completed...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a brief explanation or description of the new term or...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a non-linguistic representation of the new term or ph...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Ask students to generate their own explanations or descriptions of the term...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />4.  Ask students to create their own nonlinguistic representation of the te...
Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />5.  Periodically ask students to review the accuracy of their explanations ...
Word Wall – Marzano Style<br />
GIST Strategy<br />Highlight or Underline what you think are the seven to ten most important words in this passage (5 minu...
GIST and Chocolate<br />After being roasted, the shells of the cacao beansare removed by a winnowing machine, and the rema...
The Important Thing About…<br />Conchingis… <br />The most important thing about this making chocolate is…<br />
From Cacao to Chocolate<br />
GIST with Wordle<br />After being roasted, the shells of the cacao beansare removed by a winnowing machine, and the remain...
Comparing Sources<br />
Review <br />Be selective<br />Teach content area vocabulary before initial reading<br />Define new words<br />Apply struc...
:)<br />
Other Online Literacy and Vocabulary Resources<br />
Florida Center for Reading Research<br />
ReadWriteThink<br />Crossword<br />Flip Book<br />Flip-a-Chip<br />
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  • Vocabulary and adolescent literacy for resa

    1. 1. Vocabulary and Adolescent Literacy<br />Strategies for All Middle and High School Learners<br />June 29, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Welcome<br />
    3. 3. Agenda<br />
    4. 4. Shared Language Activity<br />
    5. 5. What is Literacy?<br />The ability to communicate through a wide variety of media<br />Visual<br />Auditory<br />Oral<br />Interactive media<br />Written text<br />
    6. 6. Shared Language Activity<br />
    7. 7. Caught in the Crossfire<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9.
    10. 10. Shared Language Activity<br />
    11. 11. Food for Thought<br />
    12. 12. dominance hierarchy<br />dominant gene<br />dormancy<br />dorsal<br />double helix<br />double pan balance<br />drug<br />dry mount<br />dynamic equilibrium<br />ecology<br />ecosystem<br />ectoderm<br />ectotherm<br />egg<br />electron transport<br />chain<br />embryo<br />emigration<br />endangered species<br />endocrine gland<br />endocytosis<br />endoderm<br />endoplasmic reticulum<br />endoskeleton<br />endospore<br />endotherm<br />enzyme<br />epidemic<br />epidermis<br />epididymis<br />epiglottis<br />esophagus<br />estivation<br />estuary<br />ethylene<br />eukaryotic<br />evergreen<br />evolution<br />exocrine gland<br />exocytosis<br />exoskeleton<br />experiment<br />experimentation<br />exponential growth<br />external fertilization<br />extinction<br />facilitated diffusion<br />fallopian tube<br />family<br />feather<br />fertilization<br />field of view<br />filter paper<br />fin<br />first order consumer<br />flagella<br />flask<br />fluid mosaic model<br />follicle<br />food chain<br />food web<br />formulate<br />fossil<br />fossil fuel<br />frameshift mutation<br />free living<br />frond<br />fruit<br />fungus<br />gall bladder<br />gamete<br />gene<br />gene pool<br />gene splicing<br />gene therapy<br />generalize<br />genetic drift<br />genetic engineering<br />genetic recombination<br />genetics<br />genotype<br />genus<br />geographic isolation<br />hydrogen bond<br />hypertonic solution<br />hypha<br />hypothalamus<br />hypothesis<br />hypothesize<br />hypotonic solution<br />immunity<br />imprinting<br />inbreeding<br />incisors<br />incomplete<br />dominance<br />independent variable<br />inductive reasoning<br />infectious disease<br />infer<br />inference<br />innate behavior<br />insight learning<br />instinct<br />insulin<br />integrate<br />internal fertilization<br />interphase<br />interpret<br />interpretation<br />invalidate<br />invertebrate<br />investigate<br />involuntary muscle<br />ion<br />ionic bond<br />isomer<br />isotope<br />joint<br />karyotype<br />keratin<br />kidney<br />kingdom<br />labor<br />lactic acid<br />large intestine<br />larva<br />lateral line<br />Law of Independent<br />Assortment<br />law of segregation<br />lichen<br />ligament<br />light reactions<br />lipid<br />Loquacious<br />Loquacious<br />Loquacious<br />Loquacious<br />She is loquacious.<br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14. Misconceptions about Teaching Vocabulary<br />
    15. 15. What does work?<br />
    16. 16. How Many Terms?<br />Prioritize<br />Categorize<br />Choose Key Vocabulary or Key Terms<br />
    17. 17. Marzano’s Five Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />
    18. 18. Marzano’s Five Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />
    19. 19. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a brief explanation or description of the new term or phrase<br />
    20. 20. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a non-linguistic representation of the new term or phrase.<br />
    21. 21. Images<br />
    22. 22. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Ask students to generate their own explanations or descriptions of the term or phrase<br />
    23. 23. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />4. Ask students to create their own nonlinguistic representation of the term or phrase.<br />
    24. 24. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />5. Periodically ask students to review the accuracy of their explanations and representations<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26. Goals of Marzano-Style Word Walls<br />
    27. 27. Pre-Assessment and Activating Strategies<br />Brain Dump<br />Knowledge Rating<br />Alphabet Boxes<br />Word Walls<br />Stoplight Strategy/Previewing<br />Lesson Writer<br />Animoto<br />
    28. 28. Brain Dump<br />
    29. 29. Getting Started<br />Low-risk activity<br />Allows students to become imparters of knowledge<br />Takes little instructional time<br />Can be completed individually, with partners, or as whole group<br />Great bell ringer or transition activity<br />
    30. 30. Knowledge Rating<br />
    31. 31. As a Pre-Assessment<br />
    32. 32.
    33. 33. As a Review<br />
    34. 34. Knowledge Rating<br />
    35. 35. The Research Tells Us…<br />
    36. 36. Stumpers<br />Designed to give students ownership over vocabulary instruction<br />Students become experts <br />Goal: Differentiate vocabulary instruction by allowing students to focus on words they find difficult.<br />
    37. 37. How to Use Stumpers<br />Students choose 2-3 “stumper” words in their reading.<br />Students…<br />write the word in context<br />list context clues<br />guess the meaning <br />write a definition/part of speech<br />use the word in an original sentence**<br />share alternate meanings (if applicable)<br />
    38. 38. Variations<br />Provide a picture/image of the word<br />Create a personal dictionary of stumpers throughout the semester<br />Stump your classmate<br />Use previous stumpers as…<br />Test items<br />Bell ringers<br />Extra credit questions <br />Ticket out the door<br />
    39. 39. Alphabet Boxes<br />Another modification of word walls<br />Designed to provide students with ownership over their learning<br />Encourages students to use text, background knowledge, and other resources to understand vocabulary<br />Goal: To differentiate vocabulary instruction by individual student<br />
    40. 40. Alphabet Boxes<br />
    41. 41.
    42. 42. Variations<br />
    43. 43. Stoplight Strategy<br />
    44. 44. Stoplight Strategy<br />Can serve as a preview of review of material<br />
    45. 45. What teachers said…<br />“I used stoplight as an post-test activity. As soon as students handed in their tests, I had them go through and code each question. The next day, when tests were handed back, students were able to compare their stoplight material with the actual answers. It allowed for great feedback, and students were surprised in some cases to see how many responses they had coded as green were incorrect. I used this information to focus some re-teaching time the next day using a brain dump.”<br />
    46. 46. Lesson Writer<br />
    47. 47.
    48. 48. Lesson Writer<br />
    49. 49. Admit Slips<br />
    50. 50. Admit Slips<br />Give students a short “challenge” as homework. <br />For example, students might receive a very short reading, an illustration, information from a book jacket, a typed list of the title, heading, and subheadings of a book or chapter. <br />Students are asked to predict, question, and analyze what they have read. <br />
    51. 51. Admit Slips<br />Students work in small groups to discuss their predictions and questions, then compile everything into a class list. <br />Students then group this master list of questions based on commonalities and decide on the three to five most important questions that they believe will be answered in the day’s reading. <br />
    52. 52. Admit Slips<br />
    53. 53. Comprehension Strategies<br />Inner/Outer Circle<br />Admit Slips<br />Online Flashcards<br />QAR<br />Who would say it?<br />Break it down and solve it <br />Visuwords<br />Voice Threading<br />Connect Two<br />LINC-ing Strategy<br />
    54. 54. Inner/Outer Circle<br />
    55. 55. Inner/Outer Circle<br />
    56. 56.
    57. 57. <ul><li>Study without logging in
    58. 58. Registration requires email
    59. 59. Print, export, image/audio cards require paid membership ($20)
    60. 60. Create own card sets or search</li></li></ul><li>
    61. 61.
    62. 62. <ul><li>Study without logging in
    63. 63. Create login without email
    64. 64. Can export, share, print
    65. 65. Study and quiz
    66. 66. Create own card sets or search</li></li></ul><li>Q(uestion) A(nswer) R(elationship)<br />Literacy strategy<br />Students categorize comprehension questions according to where they find information they need to answer each question<br />Great for moving from recall to true comprehension and making connections from the text<br />
    67. 67. Types of Questions<br />
    68. 68. Types of Questions<br />
    69. 69.
    70. 70. :)<br />
    71. 71. What do you do?<br />Read the passage and answer the question<br />List everything you did to read and understand the passage<br />Share and compare with a neighbor<br />
    72. 72. Metacognition Activity<br />Loitering with a vacant eye<br />Along the Grecian gallery,<br />And brooding on my heavy ill,<br />I met a statue standing still.<br />Still in marble stone stood he,<br />And steadfastly, he looked at me.<br />“Well met,” I thought the look would say.<br />“We both were fashioned far away;<br />We neither knew, when we were young,<br />These Londoners we live among.”<br /> A.E. Housman, 1896<br />A. Why does the speaker feel the way he does at the beginning of the poem?<br />He is far from home and feels out of place.<br />He is in very poor health.<br />He feels oppressed by the crowds of people in London.<br />He has nothing to do?<br />He is saddened by the fact that the statue is unhappier than he is.<br />
    73. 73. Adolescent Reading Model<br />Language Comprehension<br />Word Recognition<br />Executive Processes<br />• Background Knowledge<br />• Syntax<br />• Vocabulary<br />• Text Structures<br />• Phonological Awareness<br />• Decoding<br />• Sight Word Reading<br />• Fluency<br />• Cognitive Strategies<br />• Metacognitive Strategies<br />Integration<br />Reading Comprehension: Comprehension comes from<br />integrating prior knowledge with new information from the text. This new<br />knowledge facilitates deeper thinking about the text and can be applied to learn new information and solve problems.<br />KU-CRL Hock & Deshler, 2006<br />
    74. 74. Metacognition Activity<br />Loitering with a vacant eye<br />Along the Grecian gallery,<br />And brooding on my heavy ill,<br />I met a statue standing still.<br />Still in marble stone stood he,<br />And steadfastly, he looked at me.<br />“Well met,” I thought the look would say.<br />“We both were fashioned far away;<br />We neither knew, when we were young,<br />These Londoners we live among.”<br /> A.E. Housman, 1896<br />A. Why does the speaker feel the way he does at the beginning of the poem?<br />He is far from home and feels out of place.<br />He is in very poor health.<br />He feels oppressed by the crowds of people in London.<br />He has nothing to do?<br />He is saddened by the fact that the statue is unhappier than he is.<br />
    75. 75. Some guiding questions….<br />What are some of the strategies you use to learn new information?<br />How did you learn these strategies?<br />What are some important learning strategies to teach?<br />How do we teach struggling learners to use learning strategies?<br />
    76. 76. Content<br />Skills<br />Strategies<br />Knowledge of the world<br />Rules and procedures<br />Guidelines related <br />to selecting and applying skills<br />
    77. 77. Content<br />Skills<br />Strategies<br />
    78. 78. So….<br /> How do we teach learning strategies to students?<br />
    79. 79.
    80. 80.
    81. 81. Instructional MethodologyMODELING is a MUST!<br />
    82. 82. Who would say it?<br />
    83. 83. Who would say it?<br />
    84. 84. Who would say it?<br />Traditional Elements<br />Word<br />Dictionary Definition<br />Definition in Students Own Words<br />Sentence where the word is found<br />Non-traditional Elements<br />Student chooses three people who might say the word.<br />Students write a sentence the person might say if he/she used the word.<br />Students… <br />Extend knowledge<br />Connect content to self, world, other disciplines<br />
    85. 85. Variations<br />
    86. 86. Break it Down and Solve it<br />Math Strategy <br />Adapt for any content that uses math<br />Students<br />Connect new knowledge to what they already know<br />Create images<br />Continually evaluate <br />Periodically summarize<br />
    87. 87. Break it Down and Solve it<br />Variations<br />Work with a partner<br />Explain verbally to someone how the student solved the problem<br />Metacognition Questions<br />How did describing your thinking help you understand the problem?<br />Which step of the process was easiest/the most difficult? Why?<br />What clues did you use to determine what information you needed to solve the problem?<br />
    88. 88. We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge.” – John NaisbittHow do you see this statement as a reality with your own students?<br />
    89. 89. Animoto<br />
    90. 90.
    91. 91. WordAhead<br />
    92. 92. Did you know?<br />
    93. 93.
    94. 94. The LINCS Vocabulary Strategy<br />Word<br />Reminding<br />Word<br />LINCing<br />Story<br />LINCing <br />Picture<br />Definition<br />
    95. 95. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />charitable<br />He gave lots <br />of food <br />for the table.<br />Giving, generous<br />Reminding word<br />table<br />
    96. 96. Term<br />1<br />LINCing Picture<br />5<br />2<br />LINCing Story<br />Definition<br />4<br />3<br />Reminding Word<br />The LINCS Table<br />List the parts<br />Identify a reminding word<br />Note a LINCing story<br />Create a LINCing picture<br />Self-test<br />
    97. 97. A Good REMINDING WORD always…<br />Sounds like part or all of the new word.<br />Is a real word.<br />Has a meaning that you already know.<br />Helps you remember what the new word means.<br />
    98. 98. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />charitable<br />He gave lots <br />of food <br />for the table.<br />Giving, generous<br />Reminding word<br />table<br />
    99. 99. A Good LINCing Story always….<br />
    100. 100. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />charitable<br />He gave lots <br />of food <br />for the table.<br />Giving, generous<br />Reminding word<br />table<br />
    101. 101. A Good LINCing Picture always...<br /><ul><li>Contains a part related to the Reminding Word
    102. 102. Contains parts related to the important ideas in the definition.
    103. 103. Helps you remember the new term’s definition.</li></li></ul><li>1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />charitable<br />He gave lots <br />of food <br />for the table.<br />Giving, generous<br />Reminding word<br />table<br />
    104. 104. LINCS Strategy<br />Step 1: List the parts<br />Step 2: Identify a Reminding Word<br />Step 3: Note a LINCing Story<br />Step 4: Create a LINCing Picture<br />Step 5: Self-test<br />Transforms potentially weak linksbetween a wordand its definitioninto a chainof strong links<br />
    105. 105. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />mortified<br />The mortician was scared to death when he saw the corpse.<br />Scared to death<br />Reminding word<br />mortician<br />
    106. 106. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />tirade<br />The tire screamed as it went around the corner.<br />Screaming or yelling<br />Reminding word<br />tire<br />
    107. 107. 1<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />2<br />The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning<br />Example LINCS Tables<br />Term<br />LINCing story<br />Definition<br />LINCing picture<br />perpetual<br />The pet <br />constantly barks.<br />Constantly<br />Reminding word<br />pet<br />
    108. 108. Let’s Practice<br />
    109. 109. Creating LINCS Study Cards<br />Write the word to be learned on the top half of one side. Then circle it.<br />Write the parts of the definition you need to remember on the top of the other side.<br />Land given by king for fighting in army<br />fief<br />
    110. 110. Creating LINCS Study Cards<br />Write the Reminding Word on the bottom half of the first side. Write the LINCing Story on the bottom half of the second side. Draw the LINCing Picture on the bottom half of the second side.<br />fief<br />Land given by king for fighting in army<br />Chief of his land<br />chief<br />
    111. 111. The LINCing Routine<br /> Transforms potentially weak linksbetween a wordand its definitioninto a chainof strong links<br />
    112. 112. :)<br />
    113. 113. Break<br />Back to Theory<br />
    114. 114. Metacognitive Questions<br />
    115. 115. The Research Tells Us…<br />
    116. 116. Did you know that…<br />Knowledge of vocabulary is one of the best predictors of success in all school subjects?<br />The percentage of English language learners (ELL’s) has grown 105% since 1991 while the overall school population has grown 12%?<br />A study found that as many as 80% of students from low-literacy homes could become grade-level readers if they are placed in literacy-rich classrooms?<br />
    117. 117. Organizational Resources<br />Two-Column Charts<br />Adding Labels<br />Frayer Model <br />The Lotus<br />Affinity Diagram<br />Event Map<br />Web Resources<br />
    118. 118. Lexipedia<br />
    119. 119. Visuwords<br />
    120. 120. Organizational Resources<br />Two-Column Charts<br />Adding Labels<br />Frayer Model <br />The Lotus<br />Affinity Diagram<br />Event Map<br />Web Resources<br />
    121. 121.
    122. 122. Model I<br />Students provide a definition, list characteristics, and provide examples and non-examples of the concept. <br />
    123. 123. Model II<br />Includes a definition<br />Omits non-essential characteristics<br />
    124. 124. Frayer Model<br />Students will:<br />develop understanding of key concepts and vocabulary<br />draw on prior knowledge to make connections among concepts<br />compare attributes and examples<br />think critically to find relationships between concepts and to develop deeper understanding<br />make visual connections and personal associations<br />
    125. 125. Lotus Diagram<br />Analytical, organizational tool for breaking broad topics into components, which can then be further organized, analyzed or prioritized.<br />The issue or challenge is placed in the square in the middle of the diagram. <br />Students then brainstorm to define eight new, related ideas or issues (often characteristics or facts about a topic.) <br />
    126. 126.
    127. 127.
    128. 128.
    129. 129. Lotus Diagram<br />Keeps students from becoming overwhelmed<br />Provides an outline for students to expand their thinking<br />Defines the topic being studied<br />Fosters thinking skills<br />Organize ideas<br />Identify relationships<br />
    130. 130. Graphic Organizers<br />More graphicorganizer links<br />
    131. 131.
    132. 132. Question for You<br />How did you learn the skill of note taking?<br />How did this skill contribute to your success (or lack thereof)?<br />
    133. 133. Interactive Notes<br />Help students read and interpret informational or literary texts<br />Guide students through the reading process<br />Assist students as they develop their ideas and express them in academic language<br />
    134. 134. Customizable Printables<br />
    135. 135. Note Taking and Summarizing Strategies<br />GIST<br />Cornell Notes/Q-Notes<br />Break it Down and Solve it<br />Wordle<br />FIT Sheet<br />What I Know Sentences<br />
    136. 136. What happens when you ask students to provide a summary?<br />GIST: Sheltered Instructional Strategy<br />Summarizing<br />Develops literacy skills<br />
    137. 137. GIST<br />Read the passage – “The Underground Railroad”<br />Highlight or Underline what you think are the ten most important words or concepts in this passage (3 minutes)<br />Define any confusing words<br />Combine lists at your table – top ten (3 minutes)<br />Write one to two summary statements using as many of the listed words as possible. (2 minutes)<br />
    138. 138. GIST: Summarizing Strategy<br />Helps students separate main ideas from supporting details<br />Keeps summaries short and focused<br />Provides formative assessment<br />Lengthy passage – break into groups<br />Individual groups become the experts on their section<br />Create vocabulary list from Gist activity<br />
    139. 139. Note Taking and Summarizing Strategies<br />GIST<br />Interactive Notes<br />Cornell Notes/Q-Notes<br />Break it Down and Solve it<br />Wordle<br />FIT Sheet<br />What I Know Sentences<br />
    140. 140. Why Cornell Notes?<br />Cornell note taking stimulates critical thinking skills.<br />Note taking helps students remember what is said in class.<br />A good set of notes can help students work on assignments and prepare for tests outside of the classroom.<br />Good notes allow students to help each other problem solve.<br />Good Notes help students organize and process data and information.<br />Helps student recall by getting them to process their notes three times.<br />
    141. 141. First & Last Name<br />Class Title<br />Period<br />Date<br />Topic<br />Questions,<br />Subtitles,<br />Headings,<br />Etc.<br />Class Notes<br />(Notes, Examples,<br />Diagrams, Etc.)<br />2 1/2”<br />3 to 4 sentence summary across <br />the bottom of the last page of the day’s notes<br />
    142. 142. Subject: <br />Why take Cornell notes?<br /> Date: 1/2/09<br />P<br />R<br />O<br />C<br />E<br />S<br />S<br />M<br />a<br />i<br />n<br />I<br />d<br />e<br />a<br />s<br />(<br />i<br />n<br />p<br />u<br />t<br />)<br />P<br />R<br />O<br />C<br />E<br />S<br />S<br />M<br />a<br />i<br />n<br />I<br />d<br />e<br />a<br />s<br />(<br />i<br />n<br />p<br />u<br />t<br />)<br />(<br />o<br />u<br />t<br />p<br />u<br />t<br />)<br />(<br />o<br />u<br />t<br />p<br />u<br />t<br />)<br />Can<br /> be used to provide an outline of chapter or lecture. <br />Organized by main ideas and details. <br />How can <br />Can be as detailed as necessary. <br />Cornell notes <br />Sequential<br />--<br /> take notes as they are given by instructor or <br />help me <br />text in an orderly fashion. <br />organize my <br />After class, write a summary of what you learned to <br />ideas?<br />clarify and reinforce learning and to assist retention. <br />Can be used as study tool: <br />Which side for <br /> 1. Define terms or explain concepts listed on left side. <br />diagrams?<br /> 2. Identify the concept or term on the right side.<br />Can be used to provide a "big picture" of the chapter or<br />Why use <br />lecture. <br />concept maps?<br />Organized by main ideas and sub-topics<br />Limited in how much detail you can represent. <br />Simultaneous <br />-<br /> you can use this method for instructors <br />who jump around from topic to topic. <br />After class, you can add questions to the left side<br />What are the <br />Can be used as a study tool <br />--<br /> to get a quick overview <br />benefits to me?<br />and to determine whether you need more information or <br />need to concentrate your study on specific topics. <br />
    143. 143. <ul><li>Summary is added at the end of ALL note pages on the subject
    144. 144. Summary added AFTER questions</li></ul>are answered<br /><ul><li>Summary should respond to the problem or questions stated in the subject.</li></li></ul><li>Economics<br />
    145. 145. Example <br />(Diagram copied <br />during lecture)<br />(Questions about it )<br /><ul><li>How do the ticks find the cattle?
    146. 146. Why don’t the ticks usually kill their host?
    147. 147. How could tick infestations in cattle impact humans?</li></li></ul><li>Anthropods<br />Ninth<br />Grade<br />Biology<br />Notes<br />
    148. 148. Great things about Cornell Notes<br />Clearly incorporates Essential Questions<br />Students devise their own answers based on <br />Personal interaction with the content<br />Text or class materials<br />Learning style<br />Classroom experience<br />Supports good summarizing skills<br />Provides a study guide<br />
    149. 149. Online Dictionaries<br />
    150. 150. Wordle<br />
    151. 151. Sonnet 116<br />Let me not to the marriage of true minds<br />Admit impediments. Love is not love<br />Which alters when it alteration finds,<br />Or bends with the remover to remove:<br />O no! it is an ever-fixed mark<br />That looks on tempests and is never shaken;<br />It is the star to every wandering bark,<br />Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.<br />Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks<br />Within his bending sickle's compass come:<br />Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,<br />But bears it out even to the edge of doom.<br />If this be error and upon me proved,<br />I never writ, nor no man ever loved.<br />
    152. 152.
    153. 153. FIT Sheet<br />Three Steps to Better Comprehension<br />Fact<br />Interpretation <br />Tie-In<br />Instrument to assess reading comprehension, interpretive skills, and ability to tie reading selections into the real world.<br />Scored on a three-point scale. <br />One point for the F section<br />One for the I section<br />One for the T section <br />Students may receive partial credit for one or more sections. <br />The highest grade on a F-I-T Sheet is a 3 <br />
    154. 154. FIT Sheet<br />Facts - Be careful what you choose – it must be open to interpretation.<br />Interpretation – Difficult for students <br />Analyzing, evaluating, synthesizing, creating ideas and information – <br />Students generally lose points in this section. <br />They often restate the fact until they learn how to interpret and have an opinion <br />Lends itself to the teachable moment<br />Tie-In – Easy for students – <br />Personal responses <br />Learn about students’ values, beliefs, ideas, families, etc.<br />
    155. 155. Closure Strategies<br />+ Δ ?<br />The Important Thing…<br />Ticket out the Door<br />3-2-1<br />Capture your Thoughts<br />
    156. 156. Formative Assessment<br />Important part of designing lessons<br />Takes place constantly and consistently with great teachers<br />At the end of the class is a great time for formative assessment<br />Five strategies<br />
    157. 157. + Δ ?<br />Students have an opportunity to share what they …<br />+ – found clear, good, fun, interesting<br />Δ – found confusing, difficult, boring<br />? – have questions about<br />+ Δ ?<br />+ Δ ?<br />
    158. 158. The Important Thing<br />Student Choice and/or Teacher Choice<br />If students cannot complete the response, gaps in their knowledge exist.<br />The Important Thing<br />
    159. 159. Ticket out the Door<br />Flexible<br />Daily<br />General or Specific<br />Ticket out the Door<br />
    160. 160. 3-2-1<br />3 reasons for global warming<br />2 ways to improve the quality of our air in Hickory<br />1 thing you can do at home to improve help the environment<br />3-2-1<br />
    161. 161. Capture Your Thoughts<br />A great culminating assignment<br />Conceptual<br />Allows for maximum student input<br />Capture your thoughts<br />
    162. 162. Impact<br />
    163. 163. Creating a Lesson Using Literacy and Vocabulary Strategies<br />
    164. 164. Brain Dump<br />
    165. 165. Previewing<br />Scan “The History of Chocolate” – are there words that need to be defined?<br />
    166. 166. Vocabulary<br />Winnowing: The process of removing the shell of the bean. In chocolate making, this process is completed by a machine<br />“Nibs:” The husked and winnowed beans are called nibs.<br />Conching: a mixer that heats and evenly distributes cocoa butter within chocolate<br />Tempering: The process of slowly and steadily cooling the mixture – it prevents separation and ensures quality<br />
    167. 167. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a brief explanation or description of the new term or phrase<br />A conche is an agitator that evenly distributes cocoa butter in chocolate. <br />
    168. 168. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Present students with a non-linguistic representation of the new term or phrase.<br />
    169. 169. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />Ask students to generate their own explanations or descriptions of the term or phrase.<br />A conche is a type of big mixer that mixes cocoa butter into chocolate.<br />
    170. 170. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />4. Ask students to create their own nonlinguistic representation of the term or phrase.<br />
    171. 171. Five-Step Process for Teaching Vocabulary<br />5. Periodically ask students to review the accuracy of their explanations and representations.<br />
    172. 172. Word Wall – Marzano Style<br />
    173. 173. GIST Strategy<br />Highlight or Underline what you think are the seven to ten most important words in this passage (5 minutes)<br />Combine lists at your table – top ten (3 minutes)<br />Write one to two summary statements using as many of the listed words as possible. (3 minutes)<br />Online stopwatch<br />
    174. 174. GIST and Chocolate<br />After being roasted, the shells of the cacao beansare removed by a winnowing machine, and the remaining “nibs” are combined to bring out the perfect chocolateflavor before butter, sugar, and other ingredients are combined to make the bitter paste sweet. <br />A rolling machine smoothes the gritty texture, and the all-important conchingprocess is used to heat and stir the aromatic mixture until it is placed in a tempering machine to slowly cool.<br />
    175. 175. The Important Thing About…<br />Conchingis… <br />The most important thing about this making chocolate is…<br />
    176. 176. From Cacao to Chocolate<br />
    177. 177. GIST with Wordle<br />After being roasted, the shells of the cacao beansare removed by a winnowing machine, and the remaining “nibs” are combined to bring out the perfect chocolateflavor before butter, sugar, milk, and other ingredientsare combined to make the bitterpaste sweet. <br />A rolling machine smoothes the gritty texture, and the all-important conchingprocess is used to heat and stir the aromatic mixture until it is placed in a temperingmachine to slowly cool.<br />
    178. 178. Comparing Sources<br />
    179. 179. Review <br />Be selective<br />Teach content area vocabulary before initial reading<br />Define new words<br />Apply structural analysis<br />Use vocabulary strategies<br />Practice<br />Assess!<br />
    180. 180. :)<br />
    181. 181. Other Online Literacy and Vocabulary Resources<br />
    182. 182. Florida Center for Reading Research<br />
    183. 183. ReadWriteThink<br />Crossword<br />Flip Book<br />Flip-a-Chip<br />
    184. 184. Scholastic Vocab Tools<br />
    185. 185. Text-To-Speech<br />
    186. 186. :)<br />
    187. 187. Questions?<br />Please complete the evaluation before you leave.<br />
    188. 188. Questions?<br />
    189. 189. References<br />Allen, J.(2004). Tools for teaching content literacy. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers.<br />Beers, Sue (2008). Adolescent literacy. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. <br />Blachowicz, C., & Cobb, C. (2007). Teaching vocabulary across the content areas. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. <br />Bloom, Benjamin (2008). Mastery learning. Retrieved August 25, 2009, from Funderstanding Web site: http://www.funderstanding.com/content/mastery-learning<br />Brassard, M. (1989). The Memory Jogger Plus+, pp. 17-39. Methuen, MA: Goal/QPC.<br />Bouchard, Margaret (2005). Comprehension strategies for English language learners. New York, New York: Scholastic.<br />Bullock, P., & Maben A. (2005). Cornell Notes. AVID: Decades of college dreams. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from http://www.regionvavid.org/user_docs/Resource/Cornell%20Notes%20Student%20PPT.ppt<br />Burke, J. (n.d.). Jim Burke: English Companion. Jim Burke: English Companion. Retrieved November 3, 2009, from http://www.englishcompanion.com/index.shtml<br />Department of the Navy (November 1992). Fundamentals of Total Quality Leadership (Instructor Guide), pp. 6-64 – 6-67. San Diego, CA: Naval Personnel Research and Development Center.<br />Department of the Navy (June 1994). Methods for Managing Quality (Instructor Guide), Module 2, Lesson 4 pp. 48-57. Washington, DC: OUSN Total Quality Leadership Office.<br />Deschler, D. (2006, August 8). Using Learning Strategies to Improve How Students Learn and Perform . Oregon Department of Education - Home - Oregon Department of Education. Retrieved November 3, 2009, from http://www.ode.state.or.us/.../elarts/.../deshler_usinglearningstrategies.ppt <br />Frayer model. (2008). Retrieved October 16, 2008, from West Virginia department of education Web site: http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/documents/BlankFrayerModel.doc<br />King, R. (1989). Hoshin Planning, The Developmental Approach, pp. 4-2 – 4-5. Methuen, MA: Goal/QPC.<br />Marzano, R., Norton, J., Paynter, D., Pickering, D., & Gaddy, B. (2001). A handbook for classroom instruction that works. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriuclum Development.<br />McKeown, M., I Beck, G. Sinartra, and J. Loxterman, 1992. “The Contribution of Prior Knowledge and Coherent Text to Comprehension.” Reading Research Quarterly 27: 79-93.<br />Thompson, M., & Thompson, J. (1996). Learning-focused middle & high schools: A high achievement project. Boone: Learning Concepts, Inc.<br />Visuwords online graphical dictionary. (2008). Retrieved September 27, 2008, from Visuwords online graphical dictionary and thesaurus Web site: http://www.visuwords.com/ <br />Voicethread. (2008). Retrieved September 27, 2008, from Voicethread Web site: http://www.voicethread.com/<br />(2008). [Weblog] Affinity diagram. Toolbox for IT. Retrieved October 20, 2008, from http://it.toolbox.com/wiki/index.php/Affinity_Diagram#Introduction<br />York-Barr, J., Sommers, W., Ghere, G., & Montie, J. (2006). Reflective practice to improve schools: An action guide for educators. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.<br />
    190. 190. This work is licensed under a <br />Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.<br />For more information, visit http://creativecommons.org .<br />Credit info: Heather Mullins, Hickory Public Schools <br />Curriculum Specialist <br />Donna Murray, Hickory Public Schools<br />Instructional Technology Specialist<br />mullinshe@hickoryschools.net<br />murraydo@hickoryschools.net<br />

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