Marta zientek's presentation iatefl conference bydgoszcz 19th of september 2010
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Marta zientek's presentation iatefl conference bydgoszcz 19th of september 2010

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Marta zientek's presentation iatefl conference bydgoszcz 19th of september 2010 Marta zientek's presentation iatefl conference bydgoszcz 19th of september 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • This paper focuses on the process of non-formal initiatives in education sector after self-directed development and mental changes. There is still lack of active citizenship in small local communities in Poland. Despite the fact that the movement of non-governmental associations is still weak, it cannot be denied that thanks to that, a huge amount of educational potential and initiatives of local communities (Kurantowicz, 2005) has been realesed. This socio-civic activities can be ilustrated by simple projects, copies of simple philanthropic models, sporadic in nature, with circumscribed objectives and, in many cases, combining distinct forms of education and training.Within this framework, those which merit highlighting include the courses for family helpers and for foster families, the socially professional courses as well as the short duration vocational training actions in operating computer systems, sewing, family and community support. These actions are a response to problems and needs which were earlier identified by the author. These actions try to concentrate on creating interaction between general objectives, such as those pertaining to personal and social development of the students, and whats more on information or social network. Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • It seems that these initiatives are perceived as avery practical and instrumental actions basedmainly on the cooperation of two pillars, especiallyat the local level – local authorities (women,teachers of English language) and community(adults, specific targets groups in local areas) whichcreate a real local society – „we” by doingsomething for better conditions of life. J. Staniszkis(2005) claims that there have never been a realsociety (both global and local in meaning) in Polishtradition and that this genre of society is a newconcept of present life. That phenomena of „we”and „cooperation” is a milestone in disagreeingwith a division into „we-they” (Kurantowicz, 2001,2005) Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • The source of interestBeing interested in the opinions of locals on the topic,I conducted a research in 2008 amongst a community of four thousand inhabitants, in the lubuskie district where I work daily. It is worth to note that the locality in which the research was conducted is one of these which has increased the number of non-formal initiatives form one to eight in the last four years.My main concern is with the level of involvement of local teachers in promoting special target goups needs and focusing on their educational process. In the light of their narratives, the teachers are presented as the stongest, self- motivated leaders of local development, who against the odds were always ready to voluntary work, inspiring and creative. Some of them were the organizers of the basic social rules and positive behaviours, the others encouraged local target groups to be more active in gaining theoretical and working knowledge. Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • Applying unstructured interviews and posing the following question:Could you think for a while about your loCality and tell me what has Changed in the plaCe you live for the last few years?are there signifiCant CharaCters who have been involved in those Changes in ConneCtion with non-formal initiatives in eduCation proCess?what Courses have you Chosen and why? Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • „I took part in many educational festivals ranging from sociocultural animation to supporting educational action for children and adults, namely those with disabilities of for all, being meant for individuals with low professional qualifications.”„ The thematic areas chosen by me depend on the interest and current needs I have e.g. next month I will be participating in an art course to be well prepared starting online business.” Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • „Our group is currently interested in running next cooking course with English to get touch with someone I know who is an expert in that field.”„ I think the effects most valued are the interpersonal relationships established during the vacational courses, which, in many cases, are maintained outside the actions, and the enhanced ability to participate in a wide range of social spheres, such family, group of friends and colleagues and the local community, which is often valued by the trainers of language.”„ The fact that we get working knowledge of English outside the classroom is an advantage for me. I think we foster individual learning paces and finally we develop the personal side to a great extent.” Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • „These educational initiatives, namely the adult education seek to combine local action plan with the training in a workplace. That’s very useful for me and all members of my family.”These actions I have been describing are a response to local problems and the needs which were earlier identified by teachers themselves. They create the interaction between general objectives, such as those pertaining to personal and social development – for example, and more specific ones, often related to vacational or vacationally-oriented training. In the information actions the format of the initiatives was varied, experimental and frequently dependent on the effort of volunteers and professionals who were, to a varying degree, prepared for them, whereas in these cases the non- formal actions are organised according to a traditional classroom training format with teacher-led instruction, demonstration, as well as exercises and tasks carried out individually or in groups. In these cases, the individual and social impacts are frequently evaluated, and those involving changes in the traineers’ lifestyles are valued, particurarly when they involve employment (finding or changing jobs). Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • The cases examined in this presentation show there is an active involvement of different actors who, at various levels, contribute to the recognition and development of adult education. Among these are the adults who, in their search for other types of knowledge and opportunities to establish social relationships, get involved into other forms of learning and develop other abilities, the teachers-trainers and professionals who commit themselves to pedagogic interventions that are efficient, effective and relevant to the students. However, this involvement does not always go hand in hand with a reflection on the process being developed. That may be connected with a lack of tradition among the adults to formally present their educational problems.In this regard, there is also a need to hear teachers and trainers, to know what their expectations and motivations are, to reflect (together with students) on the non-formal educational actions and their meaning so as to assess the usefulness and relevance of education and learning instances that have to take into account the people they were designed and developed for. In addition, this dialogue may further assist adult education in gathering not only social but also pedagogical and civic recognition that will consolidate the field and promote the implementation of a humanistic and democratic education fostering citizenship that is available to everyone (Melo, Lima & Almeida, 2000). Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • Almeida, Joao Ferreira (Coord.); Rosa, Alexandre, Pedroso, Paulo; Quedas, Maria Joao; Silva J.A. Educacao de Adultos, Relatorio Final (Versao Provisoria), Lisboa: Ministerio de Eucacao/Basica e Instituto Superior das Ciencias do Trabalho e da Empresa, CIDIEC (unpublished document)Kurantowicz E., 2001, Local Identity of Small Communities. Continuity or Change (in:) Adult Education and Democratic Citizenship, ESREA Papers, Impuls PublisherKurantowicz E., 2005, Small Local Communities and their Transformations (in:) Old and New Worlds of Adult Learning, Wydawnictwo naukowe DSWE, TWP we WrocławiuStaniszkis J., 2005, Szanse Polski, Wydawnictwo Rectus, Komorów Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa, Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University
  • Thank you for Your attention Marta Zientek, Gimnazjum nr 1 Szprotawa,Centre for European Studies, Jagiellonian University