OPERATE<br />SERVICE<br />NOT<br />YOUR<br />TYPICAL<br />ALL<br />BUSINESS<br />KNOWLEDGE<br />VALUE<br />INFORMATION<br ...
What is the typical information overload presentation?<br /><ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
Timeline of information flows
Rhetorical questions
“What are we doing to ourselves?”
Call to action
Vague pronouncements
Specific menial recommendations
Time management tips
Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />
<ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
Timeline of information flows
Rhetorical questions
“What are we doing to ourselves?”
Call to action
Vague pronouncements
Specific menial recommendations
Time management tips
Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />STOP<br />
<ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
Timeline of information flows
Rhetorical questions
“What are we doing to ourselves?”
Call to action
Vague pronouncements
Specific menial recommendations
Time management tips
Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />REWIND<br />
What is overload?<br />
What is non-overload?<br />
What is this? <br />Zack Shackleton<br />Beautiful.  Ugly.  Exciting.  Numbing.  Choice.  Overload.  Can’t find it.  It’s ...
Today’s topic: 	Enterprise Attention Management<br />Presenter: 	Craig Roth<br />		Service Director and Senior Analyst<br ...
Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
A framing model
A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Information undefined<br />Price (in time)<br />o...
Information overload, scarcity, and undefined are all problems, but attacking any one in isolation can have unintended con...
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Not your typical information overload presentation

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KM Chicago (November, 2009)

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  • Not your typical information overload presentation

    1. 1. OPERATE<br />SERVICE<br />NOT<br />YOUR<br />TYPICAL<br />ALL<br />BUSINESS<br />KNOWLEDGE<br />VALUE<br />INFORMATION<br />OVERLOAD<br />PRESENTATION<br />TOO<br />STRATEGY<br />CAPTURE<br />ORGANIZATION<br />JAMES<br />WITH<br />ELLINGTON<br />BY<br />ROTH<br />CRAIG<br />CARREY<br />All Contents © 2009 Craig Roth. All rights reserved.<br />
    2. 2. What is the typical information overload presentation?<br /><ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
    3. 3. Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
    4. 4. Timeline of information flows
    5. 5. Rhetorical questions
    6. 6. “What are we doing to ourselves?”
    7. 7. Call to action
    8. 8. Vague pronouncements
    9. 9. Specific menial recommendations
    10. 10. Time management tips
    11. 11. Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
    12. 12. Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />
    13. 13. <ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
    14. 14. Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
    15. 15. Timeline of information flows
    16. 16. Rhetorical questions
    17. 17. “What are we doing to ourselves?”
    18. 18. Call to action
    19. 19. Vague pronouncements
    20. 20. Specific menial recommendations
    21. 21. Time management tips
    22. 22. Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
    23. 23. Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />STOP<br />
    24. 24. <ul><li>Quotes about how stressed “we” are
    25. 25. Basex quote: $900,000,000,000 (28%)
    26. 26. Timeline of information flows
    27. 27. Rhetorical questions
    28. 28. “What are we doing to ourselves?”
    29. 29. Call to action
    30. 30. Vague pronouncements
    31. 31. Specific menial recommendations
    32. 32. Time management tips
    33. 33. Ironic self-referential observation about information overload in the room
    34. 34. Thank you!</li></ul>The Typical Information Overload Presentation in 3 Minutes<br />REWIND<br />
    35. 35. What is overload?<br />
    36. 36. What is non-overload?<br />
    37. 37. What is this? <br />Zack Shackleton<br />Beautiful. Ugly. Exciting. Numbing. Choice. Overload. Can’t find it. It’s at my fingertips. Won’t stop. Exists as flow. Headache.<br />My workplace.<br />
    38. 38. Today’s topic: Enterprise Attention Management<br />Presenter: Craig Roth<br /> Service Director and Senior Analyst<br /> Collaboration and Content Strategies<br /> Burton Group<br />
    39. 39. Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    40. 40. A framing model
    41. 41. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Information undefined<br />Price (in time)<br />of messages<br />Supply<br />Demand<br />The “unknown unknowns”<br />Information scarcity<br />Information overload<br />Info needed, but not supplied<br />Info supplied, but not needed<br />Useful info<br />Quantity<br />of messages<br />
    42. 42. Information overload, scarcity, and undefined are all problems, but attacking any one in isolation can have unintended consequences<br />Information undefined<br />The “unknown unknowns”<br />Information scarcity<br />Information overload<br />Info needed, but not supplied<br />Info supplied, but not needed<br />Useful info<br />
    43. 43. Example of unintended consequences:<br />The attack on interruptions<br />Friday, April 22, 2005<br />“Dr. Glenn Wilson, a psychiatrist at King&apos;s College London University, monitored the IQ of workers throughout the day. He found the IQ of those who tried to juggle messages and work fell by 10 points”<br />How to throw this experiment<br />Have the people interrupting be really smart and calling with the answers!<br />
    44. 44. But I feel overloaded! Everyone is overloaded!!<br />Information overload does occur<br />But, IO is the wrong narrative<br />Ask how to reap benefits and minimize risks<br />Focus on systemic change<br />Enterprise Attention Management<br />
    45. 45. Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    46. 46. A framing model
    47. 47. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>What is attention?<br />Oxford English Dictionary: <br />“earnest direction of the mind”<br />For this purpose, attention ≠ action<br /><ul><li>Attention is a physiological and psychological state
    48. 48. Using Attention as a proxy for action pulls in an inordinate number of existing disciplines without adding value
    49. 49. Concentrating on “how does one focus attention” rather “what should one focus attention on” yields a narrower, more actionable approach</li></li></ul><li>Types of Attention Management<br />Individual AM<br /> A method for gaining control / managing the messages coming in to an individual, thus focusing limited attention on the most desirable messages.<br />Enterprise AM<br />A method for enterprises to improve the effectiveness of its information workers by providing culture, processes, and tools that improve control over the messages sent and received by its information workers.<br />Organizational AM<br />Anthropomorphicizes organizations to apply individual AM concepts to corporations, government entities, and educational institutions. <br />
    50. 50. Same goods, different package?? No!<br />
    51. 51. What is enterprise attention management?<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />QUESTION CONCERNS HOW A HERD HAS PERFORMED OVER A PERIOD OF TIME. COMPARING HERD&apos;S PERFORMANCE WITH OTHER HERDS OF THE ONE MORE THING SAME BREED AND SIMILAR SIZES WITH THE SOUTHEAST. TO PAY ATTENTION TO EACH OF 43 MANAGEMENT PARAMETERS, THE CURRENT VALUES<br />FOR THE HERD ARE LISTED ALONG WITH THE MEAN, TOP 10% AND TOP 2% VALUES FOR REGIONAL HERDS AND INSPECTION AND TESTING OF PROCESSING OF FOODS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN ARE DAILY REPORTS TO CRAIG ROTH WITH ENTERPRISE ATTENTION MANAGEMENT; THE VETERINARY DIAGNOSTIC CENTER , ANIMAL HEALTH<br />PROGRAMS, AND THE ADR MEAT AND POULTRY INSPECTION. VETERINARY DIAGNOSTIC SUPPORT FOR WILDLIFE ALSO IS PROVIDED BY THE BINGHAMTON DIAGNOSTIC LABSBURTON. FROM MAY 5, 2008 LPH AS PERFORMED THESE TASKS WELL FOR MANY YEARS AND IS PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE WITH A NEW FACILITY AND<br />
    52. 52. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    53. 53. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    54. 54. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    55. 55. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    56. 56. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />Technology for pulling forward:<br />Processes for pulling forward:<br /><ul><li>Alerts
    57. 57. Personalization
    58. 58. Search (saved)
    59. 59. Social software
    60. 60. Portals
    61. 61. RSS
    62. 62. Email and IM rules
    63. 63. Proactive reviews
    64. 64. “Canaries” (people that note problems early)
    65. 65. KPI development</li></li></ul><li>Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLING TOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THE MESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THEIMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    66. 66. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERDPULLINGTOWARDSALPHA OF ALL THEMESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES ASUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TOTHEIMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    67. 67. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLINGTOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THEMESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />
    68. 68. Here is an illustration of the<br />concept of attention management<br />How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLINGTOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THEMESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />Technology for attention shielding:<br />Processes for pushing back:<br /><ul><li>Presence
    69. 69. Spam filters
    70. 70. Ring tones
    71. 71. Popup blocking
    72. 72. Caller ID
    73. 73. ACD queuing
    74. 74. Email and IM rules
    75. 75. Find quiet place
    76. 76. Clarify expectations</li></li></ul><li>How do you find the information you need in the abundance of content around you? <br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLINGTOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THEMESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />Pick your analogy:<br />Increasing signal to noise<br /> Separating wheat from chaff<br /> Finding the needle in the haystack<br /> Mining for gold nuggets in a flow of silt<br />
    77. 77. Message<br />1. Pulling important messages forward makes them stand out from noise<br />2. Pushing less important messages back makes key data easier to notice<br />A REPORT THAT IS PRESENTED AT THE BEGINNING OF A DAIRY-FAX SESSION. A HERD PULLINGTOWARDS ALPHA OF ALL THEMESSAGES FORWARD PROVIDES A SUMMARY. FOCUS ON ALL OF THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES THAT ONE CAN BY PUSHING DISCUSSION OF THE FILED MESSAGES BACK TO THE IMPACT STUDIES THAT FOCUS ON SAFER<br />Here is how to apply this concept to desktop technology<br />Full screen+<br />grabs focus<br />Flashing /<br />Popup<br />Front<br />Page<br />Inbox<br />Storage<br />(Folder /<br />Workspace)<br />Spam<br />Folder<br />Pick your analogy:<br />Increasing signal to noise<br /> Separating wheat from chaff<br /> Finding the needle in the haystack<br /> Mining for gold nuggets in a flow of silt<br />Block<br />
    78. 78. Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    79. 79. A framing model
    80. 80. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Is technology the answer? No.<br />Can technology help? Yes.<br />“As one data point, a search for ‘Information Overload’ on Google returns 2.92 million results in 0.37 second.”<br />“Information Overload? Relax” , Wall St. Journal, 7.6.09<br />3,000,000<br />2,000,000<br />Whoops … you forgot to use quotes … do you want to include “iron overload information”?<br />1,000,000<br />0<br />Major contributor to information overload: <br />Not understanding how technology can help or hinder users who need information<br />
    81. 81. Is technology the answer? No.<br />Can technology help? Yes.<br />
    82. 82. Default: Messages fire exactly as sent<br />Inbox<br />E-mail<br />
    83. 83. Too bad these other options are ignored<br />SMS<br />Pulling forward<br />Chili<br />Inbox<br />E-mail<br />Forum<br />News<br />Pushing back<br />Spam<br />Trash<br />
    84. 84. The EAM conceptual architecture clarifies how messages can be deflected<br />SMS<br />Chili<br />Inbox<br />E-mail<br />Forum<br />News<br />Applying the architecture to an attentional system yields a comprehensive analysis of its attentional capabilities and gaps<br />Spam<br />Trash<br />
    85. 85.
    86. 86. Study: Patients often aren&apos;t told bad test results<br />USA Today (6.22.09)<br />“Doctors failed to inform patients of abnormal cancer screenings and other test results 1 out of 14 times ... <br />Few medical practices had explicit methods for how to tell patients …<br />Patients were told if they didn’t hear anything, they could assume their test results were normal.”<br />
    87. 87. Conclusion<br />Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    88. 88. A framing model
    89. 89. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Conclusion<br />Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    90. 90. Go through “info overload 101”
    91. 91. Take the good parts, reject the bad
    92. 92. A framing model
    93. 93. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Conclusion<br />Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    94. 94. Go through “info overload 101”
    95. 95. Take the good parts, reject the bad
    96. 96. A framing model
    97. 97. Reframe the issue as EAM
    98. 98. Conceptualize as pushing back and pulling forward
    99. 99. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis</li></li></ul><li>Conclusion<br />Questions?<br />Enterprise Attention Management<br /><ul><li>A counter-argument
    100. 100. Go through “info overload 101”
    101. 101. Take the good parts, reject the bad
    102. 102. A framing model
    103. 103. Reframe the issue as EAM
    104. 104. Conceptualize as pushing back and pulling forward
    105. 105. A conceptual architecture applied through gap analysis
    106. 106. Scope as organizational, systemic
    107. 107. Use the EAM architecture to expose gaps and as intuition pump
    108. 108. Take lasting, systemic action on process and technology</li></li></ul><li>Craig Roth<br />Collaboration and Content Strategies<br />croth@burtongroup.com<br />http://knowledgeforward.wordpress.com<br />www.burtongroup.com<br />All Contents © 2009 Craig Roth. All rights reserved.<br />

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