Collaboration: Growing Benefit or Necessary Evil?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Collaboration: Growing Benefit or Necessary Evil?

on

  • 1,477 views

Presented by Simon Thomson at the JISC Future of Research Conference, 19th October 2010

Presented by Simon Thomson at the JISC Future of Research Conference, 19th October 2010

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,477
Views on SlideShare
1,459
Embed Views
18

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

1 Embed 18

http://jiscres10.jiscinvolve.org 18

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Collaboration: Growing Benefit or Necessary Evil? Collaboration: Growing Benefit or Necessary Evil? Presentation Transcript

  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL? Evidence , Thomson Reuters JISC - Future of Research Conference SIMON THOMSON David Mount, David Smith, Jonathan Adams 19 OCTOBER 2010
  • THE FUTURE OF RESEARCH “ The timing of this report is critical. The UK’s coalition government is facing the toughest spending decisions in recent history and the 10 year science and innovation investment framework is approaching its final stages. As the new Minister for Universities and Science has rightly acknowledged, the success of the UK’s science and research base is absolutely critical to ensuring the UK’s future economic growth and prosperity. As such, continued political commitment and investment – even in times of relative austerity – is vital. This report considers how the UK’s research community – the funders, enablers and supporters of research – can work together to build on, maintain and enhance the world-leading science and research in our universities. We hope that this report will help inform the government’s spending and policy decisions which will impact significantly on the ability of the UK’s universities to deliver the world-leading research which supports and drives the UK economy.” http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Documents/TheFutureOfResearch.pdf
  • THE FUTURE OF RESEARCH
    • Background
      • Economic crisis
      • Deficit reduction
      • Global competition
      • Global challenges
    • Literature and data review
      • http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Pages/Thefutureofresearchliteraturereview.aspx
    • 9 out of the 15 recommendations we make relate to collaboration and expanding or facilitating relationships with partners.
  • THE GROWTH OF COLLABORATION
    • Using co-authorship to look at trends in collaboration
  • THE GROWTH OF COLLABORATION
    • Proposed reasons for the growth in research collaboration
    Escalating costs of state-of-the-art facilities Improved communications and transport Science depends on the interaction of individuals Increasing specialization Interdisciplinary research Political factors Training
  • THE BENEFIT OF COLLABORATION?
    • The impact of international co-authorship on citation counts
  • DIFFERENT MODELS OF COLLABORATION
    • Different collaborative models
    Corporate collaboration Team collaboration Individual collaboration
  • DIFFERENT MODELS OF COLLABORATION
    • Corporate collaboration
    Corporate collaboration Team collaboration Individual collaboration
    • Are usually means to an end collaborations
    • Usually driven by access to resources
    • Formalised network providing co-ordination for achieving strategic goals
  • DIFFERENT MODELS OF COLLABORATION
    • Team collaboration
    Corporate collaboration Team collaboration Individual collaboration
    • Often have a formalised existence but not defined as formal partnerships
    • Usually driven by the need for multi-disciplinary skills and experience
    • Research-focused
  • DIFFERENT MODELS OF COLLABORATION
    • Individual collaboration
    Corporate collaboration Team collaboration Individual collaboration
    • The most diverse category of collaboration but also the most common
    • Usually intellectually driven
    • Based on individuals’ personal relationships
    • Rarely formally structured
  • DIFFERENT MODELS OF COLLABORATION
    • Characteristics of different collaborative models
    Corporate collaboration Team collaboration Individual collaboration Formal Semi-formal Informal Strategic goals Problem/task focused Intellectually driven
  • INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
    • Changing global research base
      • Increase in volume of papers published (1981-2008)
    1400% 200% 7000%
  • INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
    • The UK’s international partners (co-authored publications - 2009)
  • INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
    • Countries ranked by the proportion of their research that is collaborative with the UK
      • Russia is 97 th
      • Iran is 98 th
      • Brazil is 100 th
      • India is 104 th
      • China is 105 th
  • INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
    • Levels of collaboration with the UK against the output of different countries
  • INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
    • India’s largest international collaborators in terms of co-authored papers
    Number of papers
  • INDUSTRIAL COLLABORATION
    • Decline in UK Business Expenditure in R&D as a percentage of GDP
  • INDUSTRIAL COLLABORATION
    • While research contracts from industry to UK universities has grown it has decreased as a proportion of total research grant and contract income
    Source: HESA Research contracts from industry to UK HEIs Research contracts from industry to UK HEIs as a proportion of total grants and contracts
  • INDUSTRIAL COLLABORATION
    • The importance of collaborative relationships to the pharmaceutical sector
    Universities Contract Research Organizations External Manufacturing Partners Strategic Partners Pharmaceutical Companies
  • INDUSTRIAL COLLABORATION
    • Know-how trading
  • THE COST OF COLLABORATION
    • Tensions in the system
      • Distrust
      • Lack of understanding
      • Time
      • Active management
      • Retaining institutional identity
      • The border between what to share and what to protect
  • THE COST OF COLLABORATION
    • This highlights the need for selectivity in collaborations
      • In-line with the overall policy and strategy
      • Return on investment
      • Review
  • SUMMARY
    • Collaboration
      • Increasingly important
      • Growing
      • Beneficial
    • The UK needs to prioritise collaboration
    • Novel approaches to collaboration
    • Collaboration is not straight forward
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL? Evidence , Thomson Reuters JISC - Future of Research Conference SIMON THOMSON (simon.thomson@thomsonreuters.com) David Mount, David Smith, Jonathan Adams 19 OCTOBER 2010
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL?
    • Is it possible to be a researcher but not collaborate?
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL?
    • How can the return on the investment required by collaboration be measured?
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL?
    • Can a boundary be drawn between entities in collaborative networks or is this inevitably going to become increasingly hard to do?
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL?
    • Are there systems which could be implemented to facilitate the management of collaboration? What would these look like?
  • COLLABORATION GROWING BENEFIT OR NECESSARY EVIL?
    • Is it possible to be a researcher but not collaborate?
    • How can the return on the investment required for collaboration be measured?
    • Can a boundary be drawn between entities in collaborative networks or is this inevitably going to become increasingly hard to do?
    • Are there systems which could be implemented to facilitate the management of collaboration? What would these look like?