Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Bringing storytime alive 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Bringing storytime alive 1

618
views

Published on

Pete Turner and Christi Underdown-DuBois created & presented March 23, 2011 @ Tennessee Libraries Annual pre-conference.

Pete Turner and Christi Underdown-DuBois created & presented March 23, 2011 @ Tennessee Libraries Annual pre-conference.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
618
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Bringing Storytime Alive with Acting Techniques
    • An Interactive Workshop with
    • Christi Underdown-DuBois
    • & Pete Turner
  • 2. What not to do...
  • 3. Banish Shyness. Literally.
    • The Importance of Warm-Ups:
      • "The body is your instrument and tool, just like the book you are going to present."
    • Let’s Get Physical
    • Let’s Get Vocal
    • Let’s Get Emotional
  • 4. Physical
    • Spine Roll
    • Swing
    • Front - Back - All the Way Around !
    • Big & Small
  • 5. Vocal - Projection
    • Oooo’s
    • Yawn (Temple Mandibular)
    • Na Na Na
    • Ma Na La Tha Va Za
    • Tongue Rolls & Lip Rolls
  • 6. Vocal -Diction
    • Red Leather Yellow Leather
    • Toy Boat
    • Rubber Baby Buggy Bumpers
    • Nat's knapsack strap snapped
    • Bruce bought bad brown bran bread
    • Pacific Overtures...
  • 7. Adapted from Pacific Overtures by Stephen Sondheim
    • Please, Hello, I come with letters from Her Majesty Victoria
    • Who, learning how you're trading now, sang "Hallelujah, Gloria!"
    • And sent me to convey to you her positive euphoria
    • As well as little gifts from Britain's various emporia.
    • Tea? For drink? I thank you. I think.
    • Her letters do contain a few proposals to your Emperor
    • Which if, of course, he won't endorse, will put in her in a temper or,
    • More happily, should he agree, will serve to keep her placid, or
    • At least till I am followed by a permanent ambassador.
    • Her Majesty considers the arrangements to be tentative
    • Until we ship a proper diplomatic representative.
    • We don't foresee that you will be the least bit argumentative,
    • So please ignore the man-of-war we brought as a preventative.
    • And speaking of the man-of-war That's anchored rather near the shore,
    • It's nothing but a metaphor That acts as a preventative.
  • 8. Hints to Help a.k.a. The Yellow Brick Road
    • Body as a Tool
      • Ping Pong Lead
      • Posture & Gestures
      • Body Leads
      • Standing vs. Sitting
    • Placement of Voice
      • Sean Connery vs. Other Scottish vs. Irish vs. New York
      • Droopy
      • Laban’s Effort Shapes
  • 9. Practice Practice Practice ~ make the story your own ~
    • Read the Story Aloud
    • Read from the Side and Upside Down
    • Find the Arc of the Story, the Rhythm, the Trouble Spots
    • Cheat Front
  • 10. Audience ~ Taming the Wild Pony
    • Memorize First and Last Line
    • Make Eye Contact
    • Personal Space as a Control
    • Laugh with Them
    • Interact with Questions
  • 11. Story~ Text Analysis
    • Honor the author and honor the story. Try to make choices that emphasize, not detract from, the story.
    • It's always more about the story than the performer. Lose your self-consciousness and ego.
  • 12. Story ~ Text Analysis
    • Find unique elements & Author’s voice
    • Repetition of words or elements
    • The Rule of Threes
    • Sound Effects & Onamanopia
    • Poetry & “Tasty Words”
    • Graphics
  • 13. Story ~ Text Analysis
    • Find the Main Character’s A rc and the rhythm of the story.
    • The Arc of a Character is that Character’s Journey and how they CHANGE.
  • 14. Story ~ Text Analysis
    • ACTS:
      • Beginning,
      • Middle
      • & End
    • PLOT POINTS:
      • Where the Action Changes
  • 15. Story ~ Text Analysis
    • Rhythm!
    • Find the places that speed up & slow down
    • Don't be afraid of silence
    • Don’t go too slow either!
  • 16. Story ~ Text Analysis
    • Find the Problem Spots
    • Tough words & odd phrasing
    • Sentences that break over pages
    • Pictures that differ from text
  • 17. Story ~ Performance
    • Stay in the moment in the story .
    • L ive the story with the characters and the children who are hearing it for the first time. 
    • Try not to project the next moment.
  • 18. Story ~ Performance
    • Emphasize Important Moments with all the tools from our warm-up
    • “ Pronounce” those Moments
  • 19. Sources
    • Best Read Aloud Picture Books
      • http://www.mnstate.edu/cmc/BestReadAlouds.cfm
    • ICDL - International Children’s Digital Library
      • http://en.childrenslibrary.org/
    • opening graphic is poster from Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein
  • 20.
    •   Aardema, Verna; illustrated by Petra Mathers. Borreguita and the Coyote. New York, NY: Dragonfly Books, 1991.
    • Breathed , Berkeley. Goodnight Opus. Boston, MA : Little, Brown and Company, 1993.
    • Breathed , Berkeley. Red Ranger Came Calling. Boston, MA : Little, Brown and Company, 1994.
    • Bunting, Eve; illustrated by Kurt Cyrus. The Bones of Fred McFee. Orlando, FL : Harcourt, 2005.
    • Cinderella . (Octopus Pop-Up Picture Stories) London, UK : Octopus Books Limited, 1980.
    • Cowley, Joy: illustrated by Robyn Belton. The Duck in the Gun. London, UK : Walker, 2009.
    • Cronin, Doreen; illustrated by Betsy Lewin. Duck for President. New York, NY : Simon & Schuster, 2004.
    • Duran Ryan, Cheri; illustrated by Arnold Lobel. Hildilid's Night. New York, NY : Macmillan, 1971.
    Books we like to use for story times
  • 21.
    •   French, Jackie; illustrated by Bruce Whatley. Pete the Sheep Sheep. New York, NY : Clarion, 2004.
    • Ga'g, Wanda. Millions of Cats. New York, NY : Scholastic, 1956.
    • Hort, Lenny; A N Afanasʹev; illustrated by Gennadiĭ Spirin. The Fool and the Fish. New York, NY : Dial Books, 1990.
    •   Jagtenberg, Yvonne. Jack's Kite. Brookfield, Conn : Roaring Book Press, 2003.
    • Leaf , Munro; illustrated by Robert Lawson. The Story of Ferdinand. London, UK : Viking, 1936.
    • Lionni, Leo. Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse. New York, NY : Scholastic, 1969.
    • Mack, Stan. Where's My Cheese ? Pantheon Books, 1977.
    • Orleans, Susan; illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Lazy Little Loafers. New York, NY : Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2008.
    • Slobodkina, Esphyr. Caps For Sale . Reading, MA : Young Scott Books, 1968.
    • Snow White . (An All-action Treasure Hour Pop-Up Book) Czechoslovakia : Brown Watson, 1983.
    Books we like to use for story times
  • 22.
    • Steig, William. Brave Irene. New York, NY : HarperCollins, 1986.
    • Thompson, Jill. Scary Godmother . San Antonio, TX : Sirius, 1999.
    • Ungerer, Tomi. Crictor. New York, NY : HarperCollins, 1986.
    • Ungerer, Tomi. The Three Robbers. London, UK : Phaidon, 2008.
    • Ungerer, Tomi. Zeralda's Ogre. New York, NY : Delacorte Press, 1967.
    • Viorst, Judith. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day . Hartford, CT : Atheneum, 1972. 
    • Waddell, Martin; illustrated by Helen Oxenbury. Farmer Duck. Cambridge, MA : Candlewick Press, 1996.
    • Willems, Mo. Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus . New York, NY : Hyperion, 2003.
    • Willems, Mo. Edwina, the Dinosaur who didn't know She was Extinct . New York, NY : Hyperion, 2006.
    • Willems, Mo. The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog . New York, NY : Hyperion, 2004.
    Books we like to use for story times