A model for defining and prioritising your audiences for growth. Audience first conference, 16 July 2014

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Anton Ivankiv, business planning and forecasting manager, RSPB; Andrew Manly, researcher - supporter insight, RSPB

Visit the CharityComms website to view slides from our past events, see what events we have coming up and to check out what else we do.
http://www.charitycomms.org.uk

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  • Body slide
    Logo only on white
  • Body slide
    Logo only on white
  • Body slide
    Logo only on white
  • Image & profile: changed the way the rspb talks about itself and what it talks about (brand)
    Spray & pray: better targeting of comms/marketing (segmentation)
    Cut through: talk about the things that are relevant to an audience in the way that best suits the audience (not the rspb) – ensure the message and brand are consistent
    We need a single, consistent story that makes sense of what we do, makes an emotional connection with people, and has broad appeal. This will enable us to build the movement we need to.
  • Oversampling in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, so they can be analyzed separately if need be.
    16 plus, with no screening criteria
  • 1) Reasons for people not allocated: some no answers on some key questions, some inconsistencies => difficulty to find a meaningful pattern in the data

    2)Names are not set in stone : opportunity to discuss!
  • Sending our segmentation survey to 1 million+ supporters would be very expensive and would not lead to a 100% coverage of our database.

    An alternative route was to bridge our segmentation to a large UK wide database. CACI were the perfect partner for this project due to their expertise in this field, their ownership of the OCEAN database and because of the good relationship built up through previous and ongoing RSPB projects.
  • Some segments were more aligned to particular products
    ANE’s made up the biggest proportion of our membership
    PBC’s had the highest membership attrition rates
    LEC’s were the most likely group to purchase from our trading products
    ANE’s were more likely to volunteer
  • We can now identify a new supporters segment within 24 hours and this will enable us to tailor their supporter journey to their predicted segment.
  • This then allows us to use marketing comms that use geographic targeting more effectively
    Door to Door
    Door Drops
    Cold and Warm Direct Mail
    Cold and Warm Telemarketing
    ABL media such as billboards
  • Volunteer recruitment
    Political support areas
    Legacy or major gift prospecting
    Event placement
    Funding applications
  • We can now identify a new supporters segment within 24 hours and this will enable us to tailor their supporter journey to their predicted segment.
  • The segmentation process and the tremendous amount of insight yielded provides guidance and a framework for a supporter focused communication strategy. But it isn’t a definitive view of the supporters – every supporter is different!
    Spend time and effort completely understanding your insight needs from the outset. What does the organisation need? How will they use it? Not only insight needs for the here and now, but also further down the line – predict the future organisational requirements.
    Ensure you source the right partners for your insight projects – they are the key to success.
    And finally ensure that the insight is used by gaining organisational buy-in and keeping the momentum with regular updates and new insight.
  • A model for defining and prioritising your audiences for growth. Audience first conference, 16 July 2014

    1. 1. A model for defining and prioritising your audiences for growth
    2. 2. 50 Years - Rapid Increase in Members . 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 No.members(000's) Year Growth of RSPB members
    3. 3. Adult and Family Memberships . 550,000 560,000 570,000 580,000 590,000 600,000 610,000 620,000 630,000 01-Mar-99 01-Aug-99 01-Jan-00 01-Jun-00 01-Nov-00 01-Apr-01 01-Sep-01 01-Feb-02 01-Jul-02 01-Dec-02 01-May-03 01-Oct-03 01-Mar-04 01-Aug-04 01-Jan-05 01-Jun-05 01-Nov-05 01-Apr-06 01-Sep-06 01-Feb-07 01-Jul-07 01-Dec-07 01-May-08 01-Oct-08 01-Mar-09 01-Aug-09 01-Jan-10 01-Jun-10 01-Nov-10 01-Apr-11 01-Sep-11 01-Feb-12 01-Jul-12 01-Dec-12 No.
    4. 4. Recruitment Costs - Increasing .
    5. 5. RSPB Financial Supporters 1.16m RSPB Active Supporters 1.67m RSPB Interested 3.60m RSPB Aware 10.49m UK Adult Population 50.65m RSPB Financial Supporters 2.19m RSPB Active Supporters 3.04m RSPB Interested 5.86m RSPB Aware 14.64m UK Adult Population 54.22m 2010/11 2020/21 To achieve our 2020/21 targets we need to increase the number of financial supporters by 1 million while also increasing the value from supporters AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
    6. 6. Personality of the RSPB RSPB I can’t imagine an RSPB party really kicking off I see the RSPB as spending a lot of time in committee meetings I see a couple dressed identically and they finish each other’s sentences Male, Tweed, plus fours, Flat cap, wellingtons Not well known, Bill Oddie Like a train spotter, Very enthusiastic Bland, boring, reserved, quiet Intellectual, boffin Love birds, professional Aloof, outdoors
    7. 7. I don’t really think of them as a charity like Cancer Research, it’s more to do with bird spotting, walking and giving you information, but not necessarily wanting money for it (Suspects, Doncaster)
    8. 8. Audience Development • September 2010 – Outside In Review (findings supporting the whole process of brand and comms development) • Need to address  Image and profile issues  Spray and pray comms/marketing  Poor cut through
    9. 9. RSPB Financial Supporters 1.16m RSPB Active Supporters 1.67m RSPB Interested 3.60m RSPB Aware 10.49m UK Adult Population 50.65m RSPB Financial Supporters 2.19m RSPB Active Supporters 3.04m RSPB Interested 5.86m RSPB Aware 14.64m UK Adult Population 54.22m 2010/11 2020/21 To achieve our 2020/21 targets we need to increase the number of financial supporters by 1 million while also increasing the value from supporters AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
    10. 10. Audience Development • September 2010 – Outside In Review (findings supporting the whole process of brand and comms development) • Dec 2011 – General Public – Segmentation – Qualitative  Qualitative research: focus groups conducted among groups across the UK, at different life stages and with different levels of involvement with nature.  Two key things learnt
    11. 11. Key Drivers . Connecting with Nature • extent to which people feel connected with nature • the nature/quality of that connection Challenges to Nature • degree of understanding and perceived seriousness of the threats • extent to which these are seen as global / intangible and/or distant / ‘out of my sphere of influence’ • as opposed to local / concrete and/or close to home / something I can try and influence Tackling the Threats • extent to which individuals feel responsible for the threats • extent to which they feel empowered/impotent when it comes to tackling the threats PASSION PROBLEM ROLE
    12. 12. Other Important Factors • LIFESTAGE . Child Teen Young adult Parent Empty nester Retired LOCATION Rural Urban Metro
    13. 13. Audience Development • September 2010 – Outside In Review (findings supporting the whole process of brand and comms development) • Dec 2011 – General Public – Segmentation – Qualitative • May 2012 – General Public Segmentation – Quantitative
    14. 14. The Segmentation • Quantitative research: online survey of 3,000 respondents across the UK, 20 minutes-questionnaire. • Building on existing research knowledge (internal and external): – Outside In review – Existing segmentations of green attitudes, of the charity market...
    15. 15. Segmentation - variables used – Action for nature: what they do or would be willing to do to support nature. – Value of nature: general attitudes towards nature & wildlife. – Environmental concern: attitudes towards environmental issues (positive and negative statements). – Passion for nature: interest, concern, personal effort, willingness to learn more about nature and wildlife. – Purchase ethics. – Recycling attitude and behaviour. – Willingness to change. – Outdoors activities.
    16. 16. 20% 14% 20% 11% 18% 10% 6% * N/A Rejecters (REJ) Disengaged (DIS) Sceptical (SCP) Passive Nature Enthusiasts (PNE) Local Ethical Consumers (LEC) Active Nature Enthusiasts (ANE) 6 segments identified among the general pop. Segments identified via factor and cluster analysis of attitudes towards nature amongst UK population via online survey of 3018 respondents. UK population estimates included in brackets. * Note: 6% of population unallocated to clusters UK general public INCREASING LEVEL OF ENGAGEMENT WITH NATURE
    17. 17. Title • Notes Summary of the segments Active Nature Enthusiasts (ANE) Local Ethical Consumers (LEC) Passive Nature Enthusiasts (PNE) Sceptical (SCP) Disengaged (DIS) & Rejecters (REJ) Passion High High Low Medium Very low Awareness & Concern High Medium High Medium Contradictory Low Role & actions Broad Specific actions Limited Limited None (recycling for DIS)
    18. 18. Title • Notes Active Nature Enthusiasts - Family
    19. 19. Title • Notes Local Ethical Consumers
    20. 20. Title • Notes Passive Nature Enthusiasts
    21. 21. Relevance to the new RSPB brand positioning Agreed positioning - ‘The force that will save our threatened wildlife’ Concerned about preserving wildlife for their grandchildren Concerned about protecting wildlife for their children and engaging with nature as a family Aimed at this audience to push the brand more into the mainstream and ensure long term growth . Brand perceptions and experience will need significant change to fit into lifestyle Brand Personality Sociable Dynamic KnowledgeableInspiring Active Nature Enthusiasts – Young/ Pre-Family Concerned about wildlife, but more on a global level where RSPB lacks credibility Active Nature Enthusiasts - Family Active Nature Enthusiasts – Post Family Local Ethical Consumers More focused on very local issues that affect their lives directly Passive Nature Enthusiasts PRIORITY PRIORITY
    22. 22. Prioritising the audiences Audiences prioritised through : • Workshops • Market Sizing • Brand Stretch
    23. 23. Market Sizing 13% 88% Active Nature Enthusiasts 9% 92% Local Ethical Consumers 7% 94% Passive Nature Enthusiast
    24. 24. Brand Stretch REJ DIS SCP PNE LEC ANE
    25. 25. How do we make the segmentation actionable? 1. Identify the segments within our current supporter base and also amongst future supporters 2. Identify where we can find our target segments to grow our support and quantify the opportunity for growth 3. Communicate better with these supporters
    26. 26. The Options 1. Send our segmentation questionnaire to all of our existing and new supporters. 2. Investigate bridging our segmentation to a UK wide database.
    27. 27. PopulationSurvey Data The Available Data
    28. 28. 1. Identify the segments within our current and future supporter base • All contacts on our database flagged with predicted audience segment • Allowed deeper analysis of our supporter file by segment
    29. 29. Analysing our supporter file ANE’s ANE’s LEC’s PNE’s
    30. 30. How will we use this? • Developing profiles and propensity models • Understanding what product or offer or theme or channel we should put in front of which supporters • Determining what is the next best ask?
    31. 31. Identifying Segments for New Supporters Active Nature Enthusiasts Local Ethical Consumers Passive Nature Enthusiasts Sceptics Disengaged Rejecters ? ? ? ? ? ?
    32. 32. 2. Identify where we can find our target segments to grow our support and quantify the opportunity for growth • Every individual on the Ocean database flagged with RSPB segmentation • Ability to view segment distribution by postcode area, district and sector
    33. 33. Segmentation Mapping
    34. 34. Practical Uses
    35. 35. Door drops across the east of England EXAMPLE 1.2m Households at a response rate of 0.1% = 1200 Cost of £90,000 £75 per response
    36. 36. Targeted door drops EXAMPLE 400k Households at a response rate of 0.3% = 1200 Cost of £30,000 £25 per response
    37. 37. Other practical uses
    38. 38. 3. Communicating better with our supporters • Previous approach was a bit spray and pray • We’ve found out lots of new things about our segments • CACI bridging revealed more insight on each of our segments • Attempting to bridge the segmentation across to TGI to expand our lifestyle insights
    39. 39. New insights for ANE’s
    40. 40. New insights for LEC’s
    41. 41. Segmentation Mapping
    42. 42. Identifying Segments Active Nature Enthusiasts Local Ethical Consumers Passive Nature Enthusiasts Sceptics Disengaged Rejecters Supporter Journey Supporter Journey Supporter Journey Supporter Journey Supporter Journey Supporter Journey
    43. 43. Identifying Segments Active Nature Enthusiast Local Ethical Consumer Supporter Journey
    44. 44. Final remarks • It is important to completely understand the insight requirement • Choose the right insight partners • Obtain organisational buy-in to ensure the insight is used to its maximum potential • The segmentation provides a framework • The segmentation is dynamic and will evolve
    45. 45. Any questions? andrewmanly@rspb.org.uk antonivankiv@rspb.org.uk
    46. 46. Visit the CharityComms website to view slides from our past events, see what events we have coming up and to check out what else we do. www.charitycomms.org.uk

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