CIDSE 2014 (13 May)

1,551 views

Published on

CIDSE Presentation, Brussels.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,551
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,003
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

CIDSE 2014 (13 May)

  1. 1. Engaging with supporters based on their behaviour, preferences and needs Steve Thomas David Williams-Jones #stevethomas393 _________________ 13 May 2014
  2. 2. Some of our clients
  3. 3. Our partners
  4. 4. Today’s agenda • Introduction – what is segmentation anyway? • Part 1: Making the most of limited resources • Part 2: Engaging supporters beyond money
  5. 5. One size doesn’t fit all
  6. 6. Why Segment? Appreciation of motivations • Communication • Tone of voice Facilitates different marketing strategies • Product • Media • Right ‘ask’ Make the appropriate level of investment
  7. 7. Look-a-like logic
  8. 8. RFV Analysis Categorisation of behaviour into 3 dimensions: 1. Recency 2. Frequency 3. Value
  9. 9. How to segment? Frequency Recency Value
  10. 10. 9 Creating segments 8 4 13 6 7 2 Frequency Recency Value
  11. 11. Part 1: Making the most of fundraising resources by smart prioritisation
  12. 12. Initial findings & recommendations • Good donor recording on Progress CRM database • Segment active supporters • For BD, focussed on Recency, Frequency and Value. But, – Integrate non-financial support in future? – Motivations? • Processes: – Load donor Journey module – Data-informed – Admin-light routine – Donor-driven
  13. 13. Communication Cycle v Donor-driven Communication Cycle Donor-driven Journey Driven by Charity needs Donor timescales Campaign decisions Database rules Frequency Campaigns and appeals sent to most Triggered ‘drip’ communications – typically weekly/ monthly Content Newsletters, appeals, e- comms Thanking, reassuring, asking, upgrading Nature Designed and written for each campaign Standard pack. Digital personalisation. Priority communication
  14. 14. One conclusion: • Process to routinely convert one time donors to a second gift – Reassure that first made a difference – Pre-packed second gift pack – Different prompts and copy based on first gift – Event sponsors have different motives – Standard packs sent routinely
  15. 15. Overall giving since 2011, value: • Large part of value is with 900 donors (2% of volume) • Also medium Value is €250 – 999
  16. 16. Implications • 6 segments: – Very high value – High value suypporters – Medium value – Donors – Medium level donors – Low level donors • Introducing a Donor Cycle for each segment • Utilise database and suppliers for routine ‘drip’ communication triggered by donor actions • Progressive lapsing to make sure that we do not spend all of the donation on newsletters and appeals • All supporters continue to be treated courteously … • … but some will repay more investment and engagement than others
  17. 17. Re-balance allocation of investment • Before: – Individual donors represent c.36% of fundraising – Target fundraising ratio of 12% • Over investing in low value donors – at the expense of HVDs • Re-balance the investment: – Increase expenditure on HVDs and MVDs – Reduce spend on low value base • Assuming that incomes stay the same. If segnments respond in proportion to spend increase: – HVD and MVD growth but decline in low level donors – Major Donors taking more overhead from reduced value donor cells • Re-distribution of spend creates 19% growth in overall income • Overall fundraising ratio improves from 13% to 11%
  18. 18. Part 2: Scripture Union and understanding more than money
  19. 19. More than money Give Act Pray
  20. 20. About Scripture Union • A Christian charity with a publishing arm • Use the Bible to inspire children, young people and adults to know God • Income £7m, 85 staff, 3,000 volunteers • Schools & churches • Holidays • Publishing – print and digital • Part of international movement of 120 organisations
  21. 21. Project aims • Identify patterns of support so that we can devise a supporter development strategy to – boost supporter satisfaction – maximise retention – increase income • Make routine using ProgressCRM database
  22. 22. Supporter Journeys First Gift Became committed giver Joined membership Became committed giver Volunteered Volunteered Legacy Pledge
  23. 23. Supporters in obvious groups • Donors • Product buyers • Teachers • On-line resources • Prayer groups • Volunteers • Church reps
  24. 24. First steps • Installed the Supporter Journey module • Tracked what were felt to be the important milestones in support – e.g. – Made their first purchase; first donation; became a recurring / committed donor; pledged a legacy • Identified the common patterns…
  25. 25. First engagement: purchase
  26. 26. Initial findings • Most common first engagement is buying something. Of those, 81% do nothing else. • Legacy pledges – No obvious route – Less than 1% pledge anyway – Of those that do, three-quarters started as cash donor • Most committed givers don’t buy resources or subscribe • Best lifetime value start as Committed Giver (4x)
  27. 27. The challenge • With only a minority donating, traditional RFV measures inappropriate • A more holistic view of relationships with supporters: – Understand behaviours – Respect supporters’ motivations – Develop ‘journeys’ to enhance relationships • Analytical approach: – Identify and develop appropriate data to collect – Pragmatic - first and useful pass to put into action – Learn for further work
  28. 28. Feedback & Results Workshop Report Data Analysis Segmentation Propensity model Segmentation & Engagement Workshop Touchpoints Triggers The process
  29. 29. The solution - beyond RFV Categorisation of behaviour into 3 new enhanced dimensions: 1. Recency 2. Responsivity 3. Involvement/Value 1. Recency 2. Frequency 3. Value
  30. 30. Tracking the new segments
  31. 31. Creating segments Responsivity Recency Involvement/ Value
  32. 32. Our new fruit salad
  33. 33. • Recency – how long since latest activity? <1 year; 1 - 2 years; 2 - 3 years; 3 - 4 years; >4 yrs • Responsivity – contact in : contact out more in-bound than out; in-bound is 30% of out • Involvement – ‘richness’ of activity Volunteers; signed-up; purchasing; etc • More in future - social media? The solution – segmentation criteria
  34. 34. Recency 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 4 3 2 1 0
  35. 35. Responsivity 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 10 4 3 2 1 0
  36. 36. Involvement/ value 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 4 3 2 1 0
  37. 37. • Model breaks down the silos – Pray, Act, Give – Real and virtual • Most recent activity Model brings RRI together
  38. 38. The solution 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Donor Purchaser Volunteer Subscriber Bible Enthusiast Ist Tuesday Live
  39. 39. Back analysed an earlier campaign – RFV Selected • Grapes: 30% of volume and lost money – RRI had identified as lapsed • Limes: 15% of mail and broke even – RRI had identified as self-motivated • Apricots: 50% of mail = 150% of net income
  40. 40. Socio-demographics became more clear Strawberries (4): Segment 4: Strawberries Index Counts % 0 100 200 Age Rank 91-100 (Old) 576 5.9 59 ████ Rank 81-90 595 6.1 61 ████ Rank 71-80 742 7.6 76 ██ Rank 61-70 1034 10.6 106 █ Rank 51-60 1135 11.6 116 ██ Rank 41-50 1212 12.4 124 ██ Rank 31-40 1373 14.1 141 ████ Rank 21-30 1160 11.9 119 ██ Rank 11-20 1023 10.5 105 Rank 1-10 (Young) 918 9.4 94 █ Apricots (3):Attributes Counts % 0 100 200 Age Rank 91-100 (Old) 2015 11.6 116 ██ Rank 81-90 2402 13.8 138 ████ Rank 71-80 2309 13.3 133 ███ Rank 61-70 2230 12.8 128 ███ Rank 51-60 2004 11.5 115 ██ Rank 41-50 1732 9.9 99 Rank 31-40 1468 8.4 84 ██ Rank 21-30 1141 6.6 66 ███ Rank 11-20 1010 5.8 58 ████ Rank 1-10 (Young) 1101 6.3 63 ████
  41. 41. Cardiff As did geography
  42. 42. Row Labels 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 81.71% 0.53% 1.07% 2.32% 3.54% 5.95% 0.22% 0.66% 0.18% 3.41% 0.06% 0.00% 2 0.68% 84.82% 2.22% 5.26% 4.22% 0.09% 0.45% 0.01% 3.48% 0.12% 1.12% 0.00% 3 6.79% 3.27% 91.14% 0.07% 2.17% 0.02% 4.58% 0.00% 1.62% 0.02% 0.09% 0.00% 4 1.40% 1.34% 0.00% 82.80% 8.92% 0.30% 0.00% 13.28% 0.56% 5.75% 1.18% 0.00% 5 6.05% 5.98% 2.81% 7.58% 75.54% 0.88% 0.92% 0.64% 0.32% 0.39% 0.00% 0.00% 6 2.83% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 1.02% 78.81% 0.90% 0.00% 0.00% 0.07% 0.00% 0.00% 7 0.04% 0.00% 2.32% 0.00% 1.76% 1.10% 76.34% 0.00% 0.02% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 8 0.02% 0.00% 0.00% 1.17% 0.65% 0.65% 0.07% 65.53% 1.01% 0.30% 0.00% 0.00% 9 0.02% 2.31% 0.22% 0.01% 2.12% 0.27% 5.40% 1.49% 68.12% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 10 0.33% 0.01% 0.00% 0.37% 0.03% 0.78% 0.00% 0.93% 0.00% 85.12% 0.01% 0.00% 11 0.13% 1.74% 0.21% 0.40% 0.03% 10.37% 11.12% 14.08% 24.68% 0.06% 93.35% 0.00% 12 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.04% 0.00% 0.79% 0.01% 3.37% 0.00% 4.75% 4.20% 100.00% Also showed how people move Example: Segment 10 – ‘Walk-in’ Greengages. Sign-up to Strawberries (4) or purchase and become Plums. Do not naturally donate
  43. 43. 12 final names developed by SU team Greengages Popped-in Plums Spectrum Limes Personals Apricots Stakeholders Strawberries Browsers Oranges Wavering Nectarines Job done Apples Taken for Granted Pears Family Time Grapes Exiting Raisins Gone Currants Long Gone
  44. 44. What are we doing now? Analysis • Sub-segment Stakeholders even further • Wide-ranging but high value
  45. 45. What are we doing now? Creative • More appropriate ‘asks’ and challenges by segment, e.g.: Personals No cash ‘ask’. Hand-raising pack Two-stage purchaser conversion pack Copy test based on generational challenges rather than child empathy
  46. 46. What are we doing now? Donor Journey • Donor Journey per segment Stakeholders I give : I get Recognition and personalisation per stage Tracking and managing segment movements Becoming more investment per segment driven
  47. 47. Summary - recommendations 1. Segment your supporter base, messages and asks 2. Track and manage movements between segments 3. Integrate non money giving 4. Communicate on donor terms and timescales 5. Work the performance KPIs 6. Invest according to potential 7. Make progress steadily and keep things simple
  48. 48. For more information contact purple-vision.com

×