Csif.data.report.v3.fopl

  • 121 views
Uploaded on

project description of story- and data-driven qualitative brand audit/market research for public libraries seeking to demonstrate ROI to their stakeholders via innovative community sentiment/insight …

project description of story- and data-driven qualitative brand audit/market research for public libraries seeking to demonstrate ROI to their stakeholders via innovative community sentiment/insight mapping techniques

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
121
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. DATE CLIENT STRATFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY go public! methodology | sentiment | insight | data visualizations | social media | brand FEBRUARY 16 2012 the library has no walls mapping the next library
  • 2. scope
  • 3. In October 2010, the Stratford Public Library won a $31,000 CSIF grant to undertake a new kind of strategic planning process: one driven by the community stakeholders, in their own words, telling their own stories. This simple concept meant the community itself would co-create answers to the myriad questions about the future of the library: bottom up, not top down...predicated on the concept that ‘we’ is smarter than ‘me.’ This report details the process, its results and the prospects for a future library in Stratford.
  • 4. The project had four distinct aspects: a community ‘visioning’ town hall, filmed and transcribed to capture key sequences to inspire stakeholder conversations twelve ‘community collaboration’ sessions, each with a distinct sub-community, inspired by film clips from the ‘visioning’ session a community outreach comprised of a ‘wordle’ poll and ‘coffee catcher’ sessions a social media program to index all local results against ‘new library’ research and commentaries on the Internet
  • 5. This presentation examines the rich qualitative data from the community co-creative sessions, expressed not in numbers but visualized as a ‘pattern language.’
  • 6. Instead of filling out a form or writing a prepared ‘mission statement,’ stakeholders were asked to share stories...their stories about the library.
  • 7. Their shared stories comprise Stratford’s ‘collective intelligence’ around the idea of ‘library.’
  • 8. methodology
  • 9. Rarely polled stakeholder communities like at-risk youth, small business and the nonprofit faith/service sector participated.
  • 10. First, the numbers.
  • 11. 1 visioning session 12 community collaboration sessions 13 different constituencies reached (including three youth subgroups) 59% female 41% male
  • 12. In the co-creative sessions alone, over 150 different themes emerged from thousands of human interactions amongst some 125 engaged people
  • 13. over 18 hours of conversations recorded and mapped
  • 14. Hundreds of conversational ‘turning points’ emerged, which identified dozens of possible solutions.
  • 15. We listened. Profoundly.
  • 16. These shared community stories sparked conversations, rich in sentiment (how people feel about a topic) and insight (precise intuition about a topic).
  • 17. How did we inspire these conversations?
  • 18. First, we designed a welcoming, intimate setting to relax the participants. (Details like lighting and music were key considerations).
  • 19. Using film clips (from the October ‘visioning’ townhall and YouTube) and a simple word game, we launched conversations revealing story threads about ...
  • 20. ...the ‘once and future’ library.
  • 21. And then got the heck out of the way.
  • 22. The result? Laughter, frustration, nostalgia, reflection, real live argument: a rich window on participants’ past experience and future expectations of the library.
  • 23. It was intense: participants were amazed that their time together went so quickly.
  • 24. The shared stories were recorded live and mapped simultaneously.
  • 25. The conversations were recorded and annotated by LiveScribe® digital audio pens and live-mapped by Compendium.
  • 26. At each and every session, we noted a strong sense from participants that ‘great session: we’ve been heard.’
  • 27. We then identified hidden patterns in the texts generated by the maps and LiveScribe notes.
  • 28. Once Compendium captured key conversational ‘turning points,’ we confirmed the emotional triggers sparking co-creativity.
  • 29. snapshot of 2mins of conversation from ‘arts/culture’ co-creation session re role of librarians ‘turning point’ ‘turning point’ ‘turning point’
  • 30. The LiveScribe interactive maps benchmarked key comments, in context, against the session’s actual audio recording.
  • 31. snapshot of 22mins of LiveScribe conversation from ‘youth #1’ co-creation session re future of librarians
  • 32. The conversation maps were analyzed for context and topic frequency.
  • 33. German ‘concordancer’ freeware called TextStat analyzed term frequency and context.
  • 34. theme in context sample query string library access healthcare information
  • 35. And ‘hotspots’—where the conversations sparked new ideas—were identified and classified.
  • 36. Seven story themes emerged.
  • 37. These themes naturally segment how people think about libraries.
  • 38. PLACE/SPACECULTURESELFCOMMUNITY ‘THE UNQUIET LIBRARIAN’* RESOURCESTECHNOLOGY CONVERSATIONAL THEMES *active, visible, noise-tolerant, available ‘human search engine’
  • 39. Thematic responses were mapped against seven modes of interactivity (q+a styles) around the table.
  • 40. Those q+a styles pinpoint seven ways two people resolve ambiguity in the course of a conversation.
  • 41. The results yield data weighted for ‘mention frequency’ (from TextStat) within the seven themes.
  • 42. Then we mapped the styles against the themes, uncovering hidden patterns.
  • 43. ...but expressed via icon sets, with icon size proportional to frequency- of-mention weight
  • 44. Here’s a prototype datavisualization.
  • 45. iPads salon comfy chairs youth ‘ambassadors’ media commons community hub/‘living room’ better marketing/branding icon size directly proportional to mention frequency
  • 46. The relationship between participant interactivity and story created rich sentiment and insight data, in context.
  • 47. sentiment measures the aspirational—what we feel in expectation insight measures the experiential—what we actually experience
  • 48. And here’s what they said, thought, and want: the aspirations of a community exploring their future library.
  • 49. sentiment
  • 50. There’s tremendous power in naming concepts. If you can name a concept, you can advocate for it or refine it...and demand it.
  • 51. Plus, if we know which topics arise in which context, we have a powerful predictive basis for think about the future.
  • 52. Sentiment analysis is key to this naming process: what triggers participants’ feelings about the library?
  • 53. Sentiment incites people to actually do something.
  • 54. Sentiment segmented into three categories.
  • 55. passions: ‘hot’ beliefs not likely to change
  • 56. passions include > inspiring architecture > ‘quiet’ v. ‘community zones’ > library = community ‘living room’ (comfy chairs)
  • 57. more passions > libraries must curate huge information flows, especially community data > books are beautiful
  • 58. passions give us more useful community data! kill overdues, dude! we want activist librarians who show us stuff software classes +> Photoshop + FinalCutPro + Illustrator! where’s the WOW FACTOR? help at-risk patrons inclusively
  • 59. They’re not negotiable sentiments.
  • 60. paradoxes: discoveries that contradict received wisdom
  • 61. Paradoxes contradict received wisdom.
  • 62. Key paradoxes include > youth prefer traditional human library services > seniors prefer evolving core library services, as long as access is good
  • 63. paradoxes you’ve got all this data...and no business librarian? huh? I’m 15 and I want an old fashioned librarian! I’m 72 and I want digital knowhow now! OK: show me something I can’t get at home! why’s it so hard to promote wonderful “free stuff”?
  • 64. ‘Pick ‘ems’: ‘cool’ beliefs that are negotiable
  • 65. ‘Pick ‘ems’ include > hyperlocal databases to explore local history and business research > sharing ‘leads’ for new discoveries
  • 66. pick ‘ems new building or Carnegie? green/LEED yes...but lots of parking too? love a café...but will it fly with downtown merchants? coordinate community events planning? can we have iPads instead of desktop computers? can I work off my fines with volunteer work? do we hafta call it a library?
  • 67. sentiment data maps (from seven themes)
  • 68. COMMUNITY @ LIBRARY great library +> attract new talent to Stratford economic generator! transport hub for teens, seniors deep, rich shared community experiences optimize library resources via savvy community partnerships
  • 69. SELF @ LIBRARY libraries spark all forms of creativity share story/life experiences with others libraries cross generations data isn’t everything—human connection is ‘give me context!’
  • 70. CULTURE @ LIBRARY gathering place / opposite of ‘outreach’ culture to people ‘where they are’ ‘club hub’ ‘bring people together’ film nights! more curated lecture series balance technology + human don’t forget Festival tourists
  • 71. PLACE/SPACE @ LIBRARY ‘zoned space’+> a salon for everybody, quiet or noisy comfy chairs (huge!) critical to downtown vitality digital café! ‘NO WALLS’/seamless service ‘third space’ for busy families secure/safe/accessible a beautiful building at the centre of community: inspire us! performing arts/visual arts space
  • 72. TECHNOLOGY @LIBRARY digital media lab for tweens/teens...everybody! community media commons games = learning ‘gimme a complete search experience—live and online!’ teach us software, not hardware! ‘can you publish my book, please?’
  • 73. RESOURCES @LIBRARY better fine/hold system volunteer book delivery free database access: who knew? smarter web experience curate community data please! market library resources better NOW! less shelf space...more study space university-grade texts! showcase local business stories more arts events in-house +> dance theatre poetry
  • 74. ‘THE UNQUIET LIBRARIAN’ GO TO THE COMMUNITY! specialty branches? get out from behind that desk! give teens more responsibility (brand ambassadors) teach! learning is marketing! curate more +> organize less focus on creativity
  • 75. insight
  • 76. Insight measures accurate intuition: we broke insight data down by participating subgroup categories.
  • 77. All participant data visualizations are generated from the brand
  • 78. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy seniors adaptability to change
  • 79. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy arts/culture adaptability to change
  • 80. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy UWay youth adaptability to change
  • 81. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy @risk youth adaptability to change
  • 82. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy Falstaff youth adaptability to change
  • 83. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy service/faith adaptability to change
  • 84. trust love of books/book experience relaxation adventure ‘part of community culture’ connectedness to the world personal growth self-confidence respect for others concentration patience persistence self-motivation access safety comfort open space location barrier-free convenient technology discovery knowledge critical thinking collaborative skills power of observation creativity digital media literacy small business adaptability to change
  • 85. takeaways* (in bite-sized chunks) *for future reference
  • 86. Library patrons are values- driven: they support you not for what you do but why you do it. 1
  • 87. Libraries are in the story business. SPL needs a clear, cogent ‘brand story.’ 2
  • 88. The library experience couldn’t be more personal: ignore this at your peril. (Interpersonal skills—the ‘unquiet librarian’— are paramount.) 3
  • 89. SPL isn’t an airline: “customer service” is not what people want. 4
  • 90. No: what they want is smart, convenient access, on their own terms, mediated by smart, accessible librarians. 5
  • 91. SPL better mean business about how it tells its own story...and especially to business itself. (Marketing especially.) 6
  • 92. Even people who don’t use the library love the idea of a beautiful, well-used public space. 7
  • 93. Never underestimate the power of a comfy chair. (Hint: laptops and tablets don’t need tables.) 8
  • 94. Play is learning. Learning is play. Don’t get in the way of either. And each requires a distinct library environment. 9
  • 95. Libraries aren’t just about technology. They’re a safe haven for contemplation, research and exploration. 10
  • 96. And the biggie—in a single sentence...
  • 97. Libraries build participatory culture. 11
  • 98. There is literally not a single aspect of modern culture the library cannot democratize—‘bring to the people.’ Not one. 12
  • 99. Because the ‘next library’ has no walls. 13
  • 100. And, in the immortal words of one 19 Stratford year- old: ‘grow that culture!’ 14
  • 101. That sounds a lot like a core strategy for the future of the Stratford Public Library.
  • 102. That’s all, folks. Thank you.
  • 103. Chinese pictogram for ‘collective wisdom’
  • 104. proud contributor of $35,000 in in-kind knowledge sharing to this project
  • 105. The support of the Government of Ontario, through the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, is acknowledged