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PUBLICUPDATEMEETING4 THE PROPOSED PLAN:
APLACEFORALLHOUSTONIANS
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Brown Auditorium
March 9, 2015
6:30–8:30 pm
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MEMORIAL PARK
MARCH 2015 PUBLIC MEETING
"The Proposed Plan:
Memorial Park Tomorrow"
RECAP
ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION
PARKING & TRANSIT
STORMWATER & WATER REUSE
PROPOSED PLAN
1
2
3
4
5
RECAP1
MAR APRMAY MAYJUN JUNJUL JULAUG SEP SEPOCT OCTNOV NOVDEC DECJAN FEB
2013 20142014 2015
Public Input
& Research Master Planning
MPC + Uptown
Houston + HPARD
Interview Process
Programming
& Public Input
DesignTeam
Selection
MAR APRJAN FEB
We are here
AUG
GuidingPrinciples
Presentation
PublicMeeting
InitialDesignConcepts
PublicMeeting
FinalDesignPresentation
PublicMeeting
WhatGoesWhere
PUBLIC INPUT
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
RESEARCH
Berg Oliver (Ecology)
John Jacob (Soils)
Hunt Design (Wayfinding)
Sherwood Design Engineers
(Civil Engineering)
Susan Turner Associates (History)
The Lighting Practice (Lighting)
ETM Associates (O & M)
Ecotech Panel
Memorial Park Conservancy
Uptown TIRZ
Houston Parks and Recreation
Department
CLIENT INPUT
PUBLIC INPUT
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
RESEARCH
Berg Oliver (Ecology)
John Jacob (Soils)
Hunt Design (Wayfinding)
Sherwood Design Engineers
(Civil Engineering)
Susan Turner Associates (History)
The Lighting Practice (Lighting)
ETM Associates (O & M)
Ecotech Panel
Memorial Park Conservancy
Uptown TIRZ
Houston Parks and Recreation
Department
CLIENT INPUT
PUBLIC INPUT
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
RESEARCH
Berg Oliver (Ecology)
John Jacob (Soils)
Hunt Design (Wayfinding)
Sherwood Design Engineers
(Civil Engineering)
Susan Turner Associates (History)
The Lighting Practice (Lighting)
ETM Associates (O & M)
Ecotech Panel
Memorial Park Conservancy
Uptown TIRZ
Houston Parks and Recreation
Department
CLIENT INPUT
ENGAGING HOUSTONIANS IN THE MASTER PLAN PROCESS
The master planning
team has engaged 2,950
participants in public
process via public
meetings, online input,
and focused workshops.
860 participants
Joined seven public meetings
1,829 participants
Engaged online
258 participants
Joined twenty focused workshops
A PARK FOR ALL HOUSTONIANS
A recent survey of 774 runners using Memorial
Park showed that people had come from 134
different zip codes, all across Houston to use
the park.
RECONNECT...
the land, waterways, trails, people, and memories.
CONSOLIDATE...
compatible uses together in appropriate areas.
RESTORE...
the ecology of the park and our connection to it.
ENHANCE...
the overall park experience and its amenities.
TEND...
the land and our cultural history, and through responsible management, maintain balance.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
3
17
19
18
20
21
22
15
16
1 2
4
6
7 8
9
10
7
5
13
11
12
14
23
25
Over time, the park has been
divided into many discontiguous
parts.
EXISTING CONDITION: DIVIDED PARK
VISION: RECONNECTED PARK
Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
EXISTING CONDITION: IMPACTED PARK
Legend
Water features
Previously Impacted areas
Altered Buffalo Bayou
Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
VISION: LIMIT AREAS OF FUTURE IMPACT TO THOSE ALTERED BY PAST DEVELOPMENT
Legend
Previously Impacted areas
Cultural Resources
Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
EXISTING CONDITION: PROGRAM AREAS SMALL AND FRAGMENTED
Legend
Active recreation
Arboretum and Nature Center
Urban Wilderness (trail use)
Picnic Area
Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
VISION: COHESIVE PARK PROGRAM AND EXPERIENCES
Legend
Active recreation
Urban wilderness (trail use)
Arboretum and Nature Center
Relocated active recreation
Historical Resources
Dispersed picnic areas
Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
EXISTING CONDITION: CORRIDOR ROADBLOCKS & SCATTERED PROGRAM
Riparian Forest
Pine-Hardwood Forest
Pine-Hardwood Savannah
Native Prairie
Naturalized Golf Course
Ponds and Stream Corridors
Wet Savannah and Pairie
Bog Areas
Legend
Riparian Forest
Pine-Hardwood Forest
Pine-Hardwood Savannah
Native Prairie
Naturalized Golf Course
Ponds and Stream Corridors
Wet Savannah and Pairie
Bog Areas
Legend
The design seeks to reconnect
ecological corridors. Continuous
flows of water, wildlife, and plant
communities will be restored
through restoration of four
habitat types:
1. Riparian forests
2. Pine/Hardwood Forests
3. Savannah landscapes
4. Discrete Native Prairie
VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION
Riparian Forest
Pine-Hardwood Forest
Pine-Hardwood Savannah
Native Prairie
Naturalized Golf Course
Ponds and Stream Corridors
Wet Savannah and Pairie
Bog Areas
Legend
ECOLOGICAL
RESTORATION
2
The park's vegetation has
changed from a dominant
composition of forest to
savannah.
While this marks a radical
shift from the past 50 years,
it is beginning to return to a
landscape that would have
been familiar to the Karankawa:
one that is more resilient to
fluctuating weather patterns and
more hospitable to a diverse mix
of fauna.
EXISTING VEGETATION - ONGOING BERG OLIVER SITE INVESTIGATION (ENVIRO. SCIENTISTS)
Savannah
Forest
Prairie
Legend
The design team has been
working with local ecological
consultant Berg Oliver
Associates to refine this
vision and define the steps
that it would take to make the
restoration a reality.
VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION
Riparian Forest
Pine-Hardwood Forest
Pine-Hardwood Savannah
Native Prairie
Naturalized Golf Course
Ponds and Stream Corridors
Wet Savannah and Pairie
Bog Areas
Legend
FOREST
100-150 trees/acre
25% shrubs
25% herbaceous
SAVANNAH
50 trees/acre
20% shrubs
70% herbaceous
PRAIRIE
5-10 trees/acre
20% shrubs
80% herbaceous
DISTINGUISHING FOREST, SAVANNAH, AND PRAIRIE
I-610/KatyFreeway
Buffalo Bayou
Buffalo Bayou
River Oaks Country Club
ADVANCED ECOLOGY'S INITIAL VEGETATION ASSESSMENT
Overstory canopy trees over 6" diameter trunk at breast height
Old Archery Range (OAR) Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Midstory Species 12’ - 25’
Understory Species < 12 feet
exotic
invasives
native
invasives
natives
Overstory Species > 25’
native invasives
exotic
invasives
native
exoticinvasives
native
invasives
natives: <0.25%
A.E.L. (ADVANCED ECOLOGY, LTD) INITIAL INVASIVE SPECIES ASSESSMENT
Austin
Beaumont
Brownsville
McAllen
Bryan
Corpus Christi
Galveston
Houston
Lake Charles
Laredo
Lufkin
San
Antonio
Victoria
Temple
Big Thicket
National Preserve
Padre Island
National Seashore
Matamoros
Reynosa
Kingsville
Kerrville
e
Llano
34
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
32c
29e
33b
35e
35e33f
33f
33f
33f
30b
33c
33b
30c
33b
35f
35f35b35f32b
32b
34a
34a
33e
33b
34a
34g
33b
34c
34c
34c
34c
32c
32b
34g
34a
34a
31c
31a
34h
34a
34h
31d
31d
34b
34h
34h
34i
34i
34i
34d
34e
34f
32a
34h
34h
34b
32c
33b
33c
32c
34a
Colorado
ver
Neches
River
Guadalupe
S
an
Antoni
o
River
River
River
River
a River
BrazosRiver
Grande
G U L F O F M E X I C O
N ue
ces
River
LagunaMadre
Lake
Livingston
ReservoirSam Rayburn
Res.
Lake
Conroe
Matagorda Bay
Galveston
Bay
Falcon
Reservoir
re
Pedernales
River
o River
Navasota
River
SabineRiver
Frio
R iver
ON
26°
27°
28°
29°
30°
31°
SCALE 1:2 500 000
60102030 120 mi0
120 240 km0204060
this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow
by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak sa
wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source
vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau
browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe jun
3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a
The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disju
predominantly prairie potential natural vegeta
and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass p
Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blu
of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and
industrial uses. Typical game species include
Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the T
several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie typ
shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant com
many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in som
prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone,
The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly differen
Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enc
domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities.
Austin
Beaumont
Brownsville
McAllen
Bryan
Corpus Christi
Galveston
Houston
Lake Charles
Laredo
Lufkin
San
Antonio
Victoria
Temple
Big Thicket
National Preserve
Padre Island
National Seashore
Matamoros
Reynosa
Kingsville
Kerrville
e
Llano
34
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
32c
29e
33b
35e
35e33f
33f
33f
33f
30b
33c
33b
30c
33b
35f
35f35b35f32b
32b
34a
34a
33e
33b
34a
34g
33b
34c
34c
34c
34c
32c
32b
34g
34a
34a
31c
31a
34h
34a
34h
31d
31d
34b
34h
34h
34i
34i
34i
34d
34e
34f
32a
34h
34h
34b
32c
33b
33c
32c
34a
Colorado
ver
Neches
River
Guadalupe
S
an
Antoni
o
River
River
River
River
a River
BrazosRiver
Grande
G U L F O F M E X I C O
N ue
ces
River
LagunaMadre
Lake
Livingston
ReservoirSam Rayburn
Res.
Lake
Conroe
Matagorda Bay
Galveston
Bay
Falcon
Reservoir
re
Pedernales
River
o River
Navasota
River
SabineRiver
Frio
R iver
ON
26°
27°
28°
29°
30°
31°
SCALE 1:2 500 000
60102030 120 mi0
120 240 km0204060
this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow
by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak sa
wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source
vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau
browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe jun
3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a
The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disju
predominantly prairie potential natural vegeta
and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass p
Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blu
of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and
industrial uses. Typical game species include
Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the T
several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie typ
shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant com
many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in som
prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone,
The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly differen
Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enc
domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities.
PRINCIPAL AUTHORS: Glenn E. Griffith (Dynamac Corporation), Sandra A. Bryce (Dynamac Corporation),
James M. Omernik (USGS), Jeffrey A. Comstock (Indus Corporation), Anne C. Rogers (TCEQ), Bill Harrison
(TCEQ), Stephen L. Hatch (Texas A&M University), and David Bezanson (Natural Area Preservation Association).
COLLABORATORS AND CONTRIBUTORS: Philip A. Crocker (USEPA), Art Crowe (TCEQ), Micheal Golden
(NRCS), Susan Casby-Horton (NRCS), James Greenwade (NRCS), Conrad Neitsch (NRCS), Shannen S. Chapman
(Dynamac Corporation), Augie De La Cruz (TCEQ), Kevin Wagner (Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board
[TSSWCB]), Richard Egg (TSSWCB), Alan J. Woods (Oregon State University), Clark Hubbs (University of
Texas), David L. Certain (The Nature Conservancy) and Thomas R. Loveland (USGS).
REVIEWERS: Charles T. Hallmark (Texas A&M University), Gordon Linam (Texas Parks and Wildlife
Department [TPWD]), Milo Pyne (NatureServe), Judy Teague (NatureServe), and Raymond C. Telfair II (TPWD).
CITING THIS POSTER: Griffith, G.E., Bryce, S.A., Omernik, J.M., Comstock, J.A., Rogers, A.C., Harrison, B.,
Hatch, S.L., and Bezanson, D., 2004, Ecoregions of Texas (color poster with map, descriptive text, and photographs):
Reston, Virginia, U.S. Geological Survey (map scale 1:2,500,000).
This project was partially supported by funds from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region VI, Regional Applied Research Effort
Austin
Oklahoma City
Santa Fe
Abilene
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Beaumont
Brownsville
McAllen
Bryan
Carlsbad
Corpus Christi
Dallas
Del Rio
El Paso
Fort Smith
Fort
Worth
Galveston
Hot Springs
Houston
Lake Charles
Laredo
Las Cruces
Longview
Lubbock
Lufkin
Midland
Nacogdoches
Odessa
Pecos
Roswell
San Angelo
San
Antonio
Sherman
Shreveport
Texarkana
Clovis
Tulsa
Tyler
Victoria
Waco
Temple
Wichita
Falls
Ciudad Juarez
Guadalupe Mtns.
National Park
Big Thicket
National Preserve
Padre Island
National Seashore
Big Bend
National Park
Matamoros
Reynosa
Nuevo Laredo
Ciudad Acuña
Arlington
Denton
Paris
Big Spring
Kingsville
Brownwood
Fort Stockton
Kerrville
Norman
Lawton
Uvalde
Llano
25
26
39
22
38
23
23
23
23
37
36
35
35
34
23
29
27
25
26
21
21
24
40
28
35
33
37
39
24
25e 26a
26a
25b
26a
26a
26d
25i
27h
26c
26c
27h
26b
26b
27h
26b
25j
27i
35g
35g
29b
29b
29c
35c
35c
35c
35a
33a
29d
35c
26b
32a
25j
27h
26b
33d
33d
33d
33d
35a
27j
33f
33f
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
35b
25j
35a
26b
29f
33d
25k
26b
25j
33f
32c
32c
35a
30d
24a
29e
24b
24a
23b
23a
24a
30d
33b24c
24d
24d
35e
35e
24e
24e
24c
24c
30a
24c
24d
24b
24b
24e
33f
33f
33f
33f
30b
33
c
33b
30c
24b
33b
35f
35f
24d
24b
35b35f32b
24c 24a
32b
34a
34a
33e
33b
34a
34g
33b
34c
34c
34c
34c
31b
32c
32b
34g
34a
34a
31c
31a
34h
34a
34h
31d
31d
31d
34b
34h
34h
34i
34i
34i
34d
34e
34f
24d
24d
24d
32a
24d
24c
24d
24d
34h
34h
34b
32c
33b
33
c
35c
25b
24d
35a
35c
32c
24b
34a
Colorado
Sabine
Trin
ityRiver
Neches
River
River
Guadalupe
Peco
s
River
Canadian
River
S
an
Antoni
o
River
River
River
R
io
Red River
Red
River
Leon
River
Llano
River
San Saba River
BrazosRiver
R
io
Grande
Grande
G U L F O F M E X I C O
Lake
Arrowhead
N ue
ces
River
LagunaMadre
Cim
arron
Riv
er
Arkansa
s
R iver
Lake
Livingston
Toledo Bend
ReservoirSam Rayburn
Res.
Lake
Conroe
Matagorda Bay
Galveston
Bay
Cedar
Creek
Res.
Lake
Tawakoni
Lewisville
Lake
Falcon
Reservoir
Lake
Texoma
LagunaMadre
Lake
Meredith
Amistad
Reservoir
Laguna de
Guzmán
Pedernales
River
Colorado River
Br
azos
River
Canadian
River
Navasota
River
SabineRiver
Wichi
ta
River
Paluxy
River
Frio
R iver
RiverSulphur
Pecos
River
KANSAS
OKLAHOMA
ARKANSAS
LOUISIANA
MISSOURI
COLORADO
NEWMEXICO
UN
ITED
ST
AT
ES
MEX
ICO
NUEV
O
LE
ON
TA
M
AU
LI
PA
S
COAHUILA
CH
IH
UAHUA
107°
107°
106°
106°
105°
105°
104°
104°
103°
103°
102°
102°
101°
101°
100°
100° 99°
99°
98°
98°
97°
97°
96°
96°
95°
95°
94°
94°
93°
25° 25°
26° 26°
27° 27°
28° 28°
29° 29°
30° 30°
31° 31°
32° 32°
33° 33°
34° 34°
35° 35°
36° 36°
37° 37°
SCALE 1:2 500 000
Albers equal area projection
Standard parallels 27˚ 30' N and 34˚ 30' N
60102030 120 mi0
120 240 km0204060
23 Arizona/New Mexico Mountains
23a Chihuahuan Desert Slopes
23b Montane Woodlands
24 Chihuahuan Deserts
24a Chihuahuan Basins and Playas
24b Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands
24c Low Mountains and Bajadas
24d Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands
24e Stockton Plateau
25 High Plains
25b Rolling Sand Plains
25e Canadian/Cimarron High Plains
25i Llano Estacado
25j Shinnery Sands
25k Arid Llano Estacado
26 Southwestern Tablelands
26a Canadian/Cimarron Breaks
26b Flat Tablelands and Valleys
26c Caprock Canyons, Badlands, and Breaks
26d Semiarid Canadian Breaks
27 Central Great Plains
27h Red Prairie
27i Broken Red Plains
27j Limestone Plains
29 Cross Timbers
29b Eastern Cross Timbers
29c Western Cross Timbers
29d Grand Prairie
29e Limestone Cut Plain
29f Carbonate Cross Timbers
30 Edwards Plateau
30a Edwards Plateau Woodland
30b Llano Uplift
30c Balcones Canyonlands
30d Semiarid Edwards Plateau
31 Southern Texas Plains
31a Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains
31b Semiarid Edwards Bajada
31c Texas-Tamaulipan Thornscrub
31d Rio Grande Floodplain and Terraces
32 Texas Blackland Prairies
32a Northern Blackland Prairie
32b Southern Blackland Prairie
32c Floodplains and Low Terraces
33 East Central Texas Plains
33a Northern Post Oak Savanna
33b Southern Post Oak Savanna
33c San Antonio Prairie
33d Northern Prairie Outliers
33e Bastrop Lost Pines
33f Floodplains and Low Terraces
34 Western Gulf Coastal Plain
34a Northern Humid Gulf Coastal Prairies
34b Southern Subhumid Gulf Coastal Prairies
34c Floodplains and Low Terraces
34d Coastal Sand Plain
34e Lower Rio Grande Valley
34f Lower Rio Grande Alluvial Floodplain
34g Texas-Louisiana Coastal Marshes
34h Mid-Coast Barrier Islands and Coastal Marshes
34i Laguna Madre Barrier Islands and Coastal Marshes
35 South Central Plains
35a Tertiary Uplands
35b Floodplains and Low Terraces
35c Pleistocene Fluvial Terraces
35e Southern Tertiary Uplands
35f Flatwoods
35g Red River Bottomlands
Level III ecoregion
Level IV ecoregion
County boundary
State boundary
International boundary
2 77
1
1
4
9
3
11
17
78
50
18 47
5352
17
57
56 62
13
67
67
19
6
5
25
62
44
21
57
54
7
64
55 70
69
63
27
27
72
20 40
40
1
45
26
71
65
28
22
39
66
68
8
73
73
74
63
29
6 38
25
37
36
35
23
32
49
46
48
50
51
23
24
79
33
10
15 41
58
42
43
59
83
58
60
42
17
82
58
84
65
66
61
16
81
12
14
80
1 Coast Range
2 Puget Lowland
3 Willamette Valley
4 Cascades
5 Sierra Nevada
6 Southern and Central California
Chaparral and Oak Woodlands
7 Central California Valley
8 Southern California Mountains
9 Eastern Cascades Slopes and Foothills
10 Columbia Plateau
11 Blue Mountains
12 Snake River Plain
13 Central Basin and Range
14 Mojave Basin and Range
15 Northern Rockies
16 Idaho Batholith
17 Middle Rockies
18 Wyoming Basin
19 Wasatch and Uinta Mountains
20 Colorado Plateaus
21 Southern Rockies
22 Arizona/New Mexico Plateau
23 Arizona/New Mexico Mountains
29 Cross Timbers
30 Edwards Plateau
31 Southern Texas Plains
32 Texas Blackland Prairies
33 East Central Texas Plains
34 Western Gulf Coastal Plain
35 South Central Plains
36 Ouachita Mountains
37 Arkansas Valley
38 Boston Mountains
39 Ozark Highlands
40 Central Irregular Plains
41 Canadian Rockies
42 Northwestern Glaciated Plains
43 Northwestern Great Plains
44 Nebraska Sand Hills
45 Piedmont
46 Northern Glaciated Plains
47 Western Corn Belt Plains
48 Lake Agassiz Plain
49 Northern Minnesota Wetlands
50 Northern Lakes and Forests
51 North Central Hardwood Forests
52 Driftless Area
57 Huron/Erie Lake Plains
58 Northeastern Highlands
59 Northeastern Coastal Zone
60 Northern Appalachian Plateau
and Uplands
61 Erie Drift Plain
62 North Central Appalachians
63 Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain
64 Northern Piedmont
65 Southeastern Plains
66 Blue Ridge
67 Ridge and Valley
68 Southwestern Appalachians
69 Central Appalachians
70 Western Allegheny Plateau
71 Interior Plateau
72 Interior River Valleys and Hills
73 Mississippi Alluvial Plain
74 Mississippi Valley Loess Plains
75 Southern Coastal Plain
76 Southern Florida Coastal Plain
77 North Cascades
78 Klamath Mountains
79 Madrean Archipelago
Level III Ecoregions of the Conterminous United States
2 5 . H i g h P l a i n s
Higher and drier than the Central Great Plains (27
Great Plains (43) to the north, much of the High
Grama-buffalograss is the potential natural veget
savanna to the south, and taller grasses to the east
wheat and sorghum and the southern limit of sprin
3 0 . E d w a r d s P l a t e a
This ecoregion is largely a dissected limestone pla
regions by a sharp fault line. The region contains
substrate) and resulting underground drainage, str
this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow and
by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak savann
wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source of
vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau. It i
browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe juniper
3 4 . W e s t e r n G u l f C o
The principal distinguishing characteristics of the
vegetation. Inland from this region the plains are o
of these characteristics, a higher percentage of the
are the principal crops. Urban and industrial land u
3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a n
The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disjunct
predominantly prairie potential natural vegetation
and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass prairie
Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blueste
of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and fora
industrial uses. Typical game species include mou
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Barrier islands, peninsulas, bays, lagoons, marshes, estuaries, and flat
34. The region has been greatly modified. About 35 percent of the stat
of its industrial base, commerce, and jobs are located within 100 miles
half of the United States’ chemical and petroleum production is locate
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the Texas B
several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie type at th
shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant communit
many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in some of th
prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone, City of
The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly different from
Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enchanted
domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities.
Much of the surface water in Ecoregion 25 in the Texas Panhandle occ
that form in small depressions. Many of these shallow recharge wetlan
modified or converted to cropland or feedlot uses. Photo: Loren M. Smit
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Literature Cited:
Bailey, R.G., Avers, P.E., King, T., and McNab, W.H., eds., 1994, Ecoregions and subregions of the United States
(map) (supplementary table of map unit descriptions compiled and edited by McNab, W.H., and Bailey, R.G.):
Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, scale 1:7,500,000.
Bryce, S.A., Omernik, J.M., and Larsen, D.P., 1999, Ecoregions - a geographic framework to guide risk
characterization and ecosystem management: Environmental Practice, v. 1, no. 3, p. 141-155.
Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, Ecological regions of North America - toward a
common perspective: Montreal, Quebec, Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 71 p.
Gallant, A.L., Whittier, T.R., Larsen, D.P., Omernik, J.M., and Hughes, R.M., 1989, Regionalization as a tool for
managing environmental resources: Corvallis, Oregon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA/600/3-
89/060, 152 p.
McMahon, G., Gregonis, S.M., Waltman, S.W., Omernik, J.M., Thorson, T.D., Freeouf, J.A., Rorick, A.H., and
Keys, J.E., 2001, Developing a spatial framework of common ecological regions for the conterminous United
States: Environmental Management, v. 28, no. 3, p. 293-316.
Omernik, J.M., 1987, Ecoregions of the conterminous United States (map supplement): Annals of the Association
of American Geographers, v. 77, no. 1, p. 118-125, scale 1:7,500,000.
Omernik, J.M., 1995, Ecoregions - a spatial framework for environmental management, in Davis, W.S., and Simon,
T.P., eds., Biological assessment and criteria-tools for water resource planning and decision making: Boca Raton,
Florida, Lewis Publishers, p. 49-62.
Omernik, J.M., Chapman, S.S., Lillie, R.A., and Dumke, R.T., 2000, Ecoregions of Wisconsin: Transactions of the
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, v. 88, no. 2000, p. 77-103.
U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service, 1981, Land resource regions and major land resource
areas of the United States: Agriculture Handbook 296, 156 p.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2003, Level III ecoregions of the continental United States (revision of
Omernik, 1987): Corvallis, Oregon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-National Health and Environmental
Effects Research Laboratory, Map M-1, various scales.
Wiken, E., 1986, Terrestrial ecozones of Canada: Ottawa, Environment Canada, Ecological Land Classification
Series no. 19, 26 p.
Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity
of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research,
assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By
recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions
stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance (Bryce and others, 1999). These
general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management
strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are
responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas (Omernik and
others, 2000).
The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions are
hierarchical and can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition
of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and
integrity (Wiken 1986; Omernik 1987, 1995). These phenomena include geology, physiography,
vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each
characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A
Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions.
Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides
the continent into 52 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group
1997). At level III, the continental United States contains 104 ecoregions and the conterminous
United States has 84 ecoregions (United States Environmental Protection Agency [USEPA]
2003). Level IV, depicted here for the State of Texas, is a further refinement of level III
ecoregions. Explanations of the methods used to define the USEPA’s ecoregions are given in
Omernik (1995), Omernik and others (2000), and Gallant and others (1989).
Ecological and biological diversity of Texas is enormous. The state contains barrier islands and
coastal lowlands, large river floodplain forests, rolling plains and plateaus, forested hills, deserts,
and a variety of aquatic habitats. There are 12 level III ecoregions and 56 level IV ecoregions in
Texas and most continue into ecologically similar parts of adjacent states in the U.S. or Mexico.
The level III and IV ecoregions on this poster were compiled at a scale of 1:250,000 and depict
revisions and subdivisions of earlier level III ecoregions that were originally compiled at a
smaller scale (USEPA 2003; Omernik 1987). This poster is part of a collaborative project
primarily between USEPA Region VI, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects
Research Laboratory (Corvallis, Oregon), Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ),
and the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service
(NRCS). Collaboration and consultation also occurred with the United States Department of the
Interior-Geological Survey (USGS)-Earth Resources Observation Systems Data Center, and with
other State of Texas agencies and universities.
The project is associated with an interagency effort to develop a common framework of
ecological regions (McMahon and others, 2001). Reaching that objective requires recognition of
the differences in the conceptual approaches and mapping methodologies applied to develop the
most common ecoregion-type frameworks, including those developed by the United States Forest
Service (Bailey and others, 1994), the USEPA (Omernik 1987, 1995), and the NRCS (U.S.
Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service, 1981). As each of these frameworks is
further refined, their differences are becoming less discernible. Regional collaborative projects
such as this one in Texas, where some agreement has been reached among multiple resource
management agencies, are a step toward attaining consensus and consistency in ecoregion
frameworks for the entire nation.
Ecoregions of Texas
Memorial Park sits within the West
Gulf Coastal Plain which spans
the entire US coast from Texas to
Louisiana. This ecosystem has
a unique palette of plants and
characteristics.
The Nature Conservancy counts
it as one of earth’s most diverse
and valuable ecosystems with
more than 30 species of plants
per square meter.
ECOREGION: TEXAS’ WESTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN
A
RESTORED RIPARIAN CORRIDORS
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
The cool, dense shade from the diverse mix of trees cre-
ate the unique character of the bottomland forests of the
bayou. A limited mix of invasive species dominate the
understory, obscuring views, native plants, and the rich
biological diversity of a healthy forest. The soil is mark-
edly sandier, and coupled with the controlled water flow
from Barker ’s and Addicks reservoirs, the river banks are
steep, unstable, and highly erosive. A lack of grasses and
shrubs at the water’s edge is evident.
A dense mature mixed bottomland hardwood forest will
continue to dominate the majority of the riparian corridor
(Populus deltoides, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Platanus oc-
cidentalis, Quercus phellos, Q. pagoda, Q. texana, Fraxi-
nus caroliniana, Diospyros virginiana. Nyssa sylvatica with
some Pinus taeda). Invasives will be removed, allowing
for a more transparent healthier and more diverse under-
story. The forest floor on shallower slopes will be loosely
populated with ferns (Lorinseria areolata, and Onoclea
sensibilis), limited shade-tolerant and water-loving grass-
es and other perennials (Elymus Canadensis, Dichanthe-
lium dichotomum var. ensifolium, and Chasmanthium
sessiliflorum, Desmanthus illinoensis, Hymenocallis liri-
osme, Iris virginica, Eupatorium serotinum, Mitchella re-
pens L., Lobelia cardinalis, and Erigeron philadelphicus)
will be re-established (Tripsacum dactyloides, Dichan-
thelium dichotomum var. ensifolium, and Chasmanthium
sessiliflorum), perennials (Hymenocallis liriosme, Iris virg-
inica, Eupatorium serotinum, Mitchella repens L., Lobelia
puberula, and Erigeron philadelphicus) and select shrubs
(Indigo miniata, Sambucus canadensis, Bidens albaaris-
tosa, and Agarista populifolia).
On the banks approaching and adjacent to the water’s
edge , obligate and facultative wetland grasses (Equise-
tum, Elocharis montana, Juncus rowmerianus, Tripsacum
dactyloides, Tridens strictus, Paspalum floridanum, and
Panicum hemitomon) will become more dense, provid-
ing critical cover, nesting habitat, and forage for wildlife.
Shrubs and understory canopy trees will serve a similar
purpose and help stabilize slopes (Betula nigra, Celtis
laevigata, Cyrilla racemiflora, and Crataegus opaca).
This area will not have a regular understory manage-
ment regime, but it will require a regular regime of inva-
sive species control. Dead wood will be left undisturbed,
standing or fallen, for wildlife habitat, except where it en-
croaches on trails and program areas, proving a risk to
people.
Existing Condition
Design Vision
RIPARIAN CORRIDORS: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
RIPARIAN CORRIDORS RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION
Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane
Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush
Scirpus pungens / American Bullrush
Eleocharis montana / Knotty Spike-Rush
Salix nigra / Black Willow Quercus phellos / Willow Oak Agarista populifolia / Wax Mertle
Celtis laevigata / Sugarberry or Sugar Hickory
Lorinseria areolata / Chain Fern Persea borbonia / Red Bay Eupatorium serotinum / Boneset
Scirpus validus / Soft-stem Bullrush
Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens
Sambucus canadensis / Elderberry Quercus pagoda / Cherrybark Oak Bidens alba / Romerillo
Carya texana / Black hickory
Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern Betula nigra / River Birch Callicarpa americana / Beautyberry
Acer negundo / Box Elder
Cyrilla racemiflora / Swamp Titi Platanus occidentalis / American Sycamore Sambucus canadensis / Elderberry
Fraxinus pennsylvanica / Green Ash
Dryopteris marginalis / Common Wood Fern Quercus texana / Texas Red Oak Bidens alba / Romerillo
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
64 ft.
C
RESTORED BARRANCOS & RIPARIAN EDGES
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
The upper reaches of the Bayou riparian corridor as well
as the ravines that stretch into the park, “barrancos” are
characterized by their steep slopes, sandy soil, and di-
verse well-drained mixed hardwood forest. Many bike
and pedestrian trails currently crisscross along and
through these slopes, exacerbating an already unstable
soil condition. The understory is dominated by invasive
species.
At this edge where the well-drained slope nears the ter-
race flats and the dense forest from the bayou begins to
open up, trees transition to hardwood and pine species
that can withstand periods of drought and inundation.
Overstory canopy trees (Acer negundo, Liquidamber
styraciflua, Magnolia grandiflora, Pinus tTaeda and echi-
nata, Ulmus alata and nigra, and Quercus michauxiii)
and understory trees (Asimina triloba, Cornus drummon-
diisp., Diospyros virginianaCarpinus caroliniana, Cratae-
gus drummondii and marshallii) will become dominant
features of this landscape as understory invasives are
cleared out to expose their unique character and quality
of light.
On average, the ground plane will consist of 25% shrubs
and 25% herbaceous plants. This loose and scattered
shade-tolerant shrub layer will provide wildlife habitat
and forage and to stabilize these sandy and highly ero-
sive slopes (Agarista populifolia, Callicarpa aAmericana,
Phlox divaricata,Rubus trivialis). The establishment of a
native shrub palette will be important for when invasives
are removed to minimize disturbance.
With more pine straw on the forest floor and dappled
sunlight, only certain grasses and other perennials
(Chasmanthium latifolium and sessiliflorum, Elymus vir-
ginicus, Paspalum plicatum, and Eupatorium perfoliatum-
serotinum Mitchella repens L., and Dryopteris marginalis),
and ferns (Dryopteris marginalis, Lorinseria areolata, and
Onoclea sensibilis) will thrive here.
Design Vision
BARRANCOS & RIPARIAN EDGES: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
Existing Condition
BARRANCO RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION
Ulmus alata / Winged Elm
Quercus michauxii / Swamp Chestnut Oak
Asimina triloba / Pawpaw
Carpinus caroliniana / American hornbeam
Salix nigra / Black Willow
Acer negundo / Box Elder
Liquidamber styraciflua / Sweetgum
Crataegus mollis / Downy Hawthorne
Quercus nigra / Water oak
Crataegus marshallii / Parsley Hawthorne
Gleditsia triacanthos / Honey Locust
Fraxinus caroliniana / Carolina Buckthorn
Betula nigra / River Birch
Nyssa sylvatica / Black Tupelo
Platanus occidentalis / American Sycamore
Celtis laevigata / Sugarberry or Sugar Hickory
Cyrilla racemiflora / Swamp Titi
Populus deltoides / Cottonwood
Crataegus opaca/ Mayhaw
Persea borbonia / Red Bay
Ulmus crassifolia / Cedar Elm
Dryopteris marginalis/ Common Wood Fern Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush Panicum anceps / Beaked Panicum
Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane Paspalum plicatulum / Brownseed Paspalum
Lorinseria areolata / Chain Fern Chasmanthium latifolium / Inland Sea Oats Paspalum floridanum / Florida Paspalum Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
64 ft.
80 ft.
F
RESTORED PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
The steep sandy slopes of the bayou and barrancos give
way quickly to the flat broad terrace of Memorial Park.
Other disparate patches of pine-hardwood forest have
become established across the site over the past 100
years.
The vegetative composition of this forest is currently a
jumbled mix of incredibly dense invasive species in the
understory and pine and hardwood trees that are hard
to spot. Many of the trees were badly damaged during
the most recent drought and hurricane. Some have been
removed and others remain standing.
These woods will range in density from 150 trees per
acre closest to the riparian corridor to more open at 100
trees per acre on the edges that border savannah. The
dominance of pine or hardwood trees will depend on the
type of soil. Those that are pine-dominant, (Pinus taeda
and to be established Pinus echinata) will be scattered
with stands/motts of dry-mesic hardwoods (Carya spp.;
Quercus alba, falcata, virginiana, prinus and stellata;
Morus rubra; Celtis occidentalis; Sassafrass albidium;
Liquidambar styraciflua, Catalpa bignonoides and Tilia
Caroliniana).
On average, the ground plane will consist of 25% shrubs
and 25% herbaceous plants. Shrubs will tend to be loose
in structure and planted in odd groupings of 3-5 (Agarista
populifolia, Callicarpa Americana, Rubus trivialis). Peren-
nials will be planted similarly and en masse (Amsonia
illustris, Cooperia drummondii, Desmanthus illinoensis,
Conoclinium coelestinumDryopteris marginalis, and
Mitchella repens L.). Grasses will be diverse in species
and follow a similar form and distribution as perennials
(Tripsacum dactyloides, Elymus virginicus L., Chasman-
thium sessiliflorum, Muhlenbergia capillaris, Schizachy-
rium scoparium, Panicum virgatum) as will ferns (Pteridi-
um aquilinum (L.) Kuhn var. pseudocaudatum, Dryopteris
marginalis).
Clearing of brush on a bi- or triennial basis will be neces-
sary in this landscape to keep the forest floor open and to
keep hardwoods from becoming too dense. A rigorous
invasive species management regime will be necessary.
Design Vision
PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
Existing Condition
PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION
Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf PineLeucothoe populifolia / Florida Leucothoe Eupatorium serotinum / Boneset
Crataegus texana / Texas Hawthorn
Cooperia drummondii / Rain LillyQuercus falcata / Southern Red Oak
Quercus prinus / Chestnut Oak
Muhlenbergia capillaris / Gulf MuhleyQuercus alba / White oak
Quercus stellata / Post Oak
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus / Coral Berry
Sassafras albidum / Sassafras
Quercus stellata / Post OakCarya illinoensis / Pecan
Itea virginica / Sweetspire Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern
Schizachyrium scoparium / Little BluestemRubus trivialis / Dewberry
Celtis occidentalis / Hackberry
Quercus virginiana / Southern Live OakMorus rubra / Red Mulberry
Pinus taeda / Loblolly PineAgarista populifolia / Florida Hobblebush Mitchella repens L. / Partridgeberry
Catalpa bignonoides / Southern Catalpa
Amsonia illustris / Showy Blue StarQuercus alba / White Oak
Andropogon ternarius Michx. / SplitbeardQuercus falcata / Southern Red Oak Callicarpa americana / Beautyberry
Tilia caroliniana / Carolina Basswood
Quercus prinus / Chestnut OakCarya ovata / Shagbark Hickory
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
D
RESTORED PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
Over the past 60 years, most of the flat terrace of Me-
morial Park has become densely forested. Before this
time, Camp Logan and the Reinermans, coastal prairie
with pine-hardwood savannahs would have dominated
this landscape. The recent drought and hurricane were
destructive natural forces here; however, their clearing
effect has left a density of trees that resembles earlier
prairie-savannah typologies. While some patches have
been cleared of, many areas with standing dead wood,
dead brush, and invasives remain that require thinning,
clearing, and scrubbing.
The pine-hardwood savannah of Memorial Park will be-
come one of its most defining landscape typologies. It
will be the intersection of the rich native prairie with clus-
ters of pine trees and hardwood motts. The tree palette
will typically mirror the pine-hardwood forest with the oc-
casional addition of Carya illinoinesis (the State tree of
Texas) and Juglans nigra. Long views through the grass-
lands will punctuate otherwise loosely wooded areas. On
average, there will be about 50 trees per acre; although
this is misleading as the trees will be in clusters, leav-
ing significant open areas. Shrubs will comprise 20% of
the ground plane while herbaceous plants will comprise
70%.
The grasses and forbs in this complex will resemble
those in the prairie in their diversity, type, and distribu-
tion. Grasses (Sorgastrum nutans, Schizachyrium sco-
parium, Panicum virgatum, Muhlenbergia capillaris, Ely-
mus virginicus L., Briza minor, Agrostis hyemalis) and
perennials (Erigeron philadelphicus, Mimosa strigillosa,
Chanaecrista fasciculata, Cooperia drummondii, Des-
manthus illinoensis, Digitaria cognataGaillardia pulchella,
Asclepias logiflora and verticillata, Mimosa nuttallii, Phlox
drummondii, Rudbeckia hirta, Indigo miniata, and Salvia
azurea) will be tolerant of periods of both drought and in-
undation. They will require bi-annual mowing (or burning
if possible) as well as regular invasive species control.
These areas are not intended to be occupied like lawns.
While occasional foot traffic is anticipated, paths winding
through them with small gathering areas are how they will
be experienced.
Design Vision
PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
Existing Condition
PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION
Desmanthus illinoensis / Illinois Bundleflower Leptochloa dubia / Green sprangletop
Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass
Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass
Quercus prinus / Chestnut Oak
Tilia caroliniana / Carolina Basswood
Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass
Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass
Pinus taeda / Loblolly Pine
Crataegus texana / Texas Hawthorn
Mimosa nuttallii / Nuttall’s Sensitive-Briar
Phlox drummondii / Drummond’s Phlox
Salvia azurea / Blue Sage
Erigeron philadelphicus / Daisy fleabane
Andropogon ternarius Michx. / Splitbeard Bluestem
Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem
Asclepias verticillata / Wholred Milkweed Chasmanthium sessiliflorum / Longleaf Uniola
Gaillardia pulchella / Indian Blanket Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass
Agrostis hyemalis / Spring Bentgrass Quercus stellata / Post Oak Elymus virginicus L. / Virginia Wildrye
Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf Pine Mimosa strigillosa / Powderpuff
Baccharis halimifolia / Eastern False Willow Rudbeckia hirta / Black-eyed SusanSorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
D
RESTORED NATIVE PRAIRIE
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
There are some areas of the park maintained as native
prairie adjacent to Memorial Drive and the railroad. The
intent is for these to remain and be maintained in perpe-
tuity. There is a good existing mix of grasses and peren-
nials.
In other areas where prairie will exist but currently does
not, the landscape is overrun by invasive shrubs; occuld-
ing the presence of native grasses or has recently been
cleared and scrubbed after the recent loss of trees.
The prairie landscape of the West Gulf Coastal Plain is
the dominant typology in this ecosystem. The area that
will be dedicated in the park to return to this landscape
type is predominantly around the heart of the park at
the land bridge. It will connect to H.A.N.C.’s prairie and
spread southward toward the bayou and in limited part
north along the railroad.
There will be only 5-10 trees per acre, such as Juglans
nigra, Quercus virginiana and Q. falcata, that will be the
same dry-mesic species of both the savannah and pine-
hardwood forest. Oaks will be the dominant species, and
the lack of competition for sunlight will allow them to grow
to full size and form, making them sculptural treasures of
the park. Their maintenance will be critical for this reason.
Shrubs and flowering perenials (Indigo miniata, Coreop-
sis lanceolata, Desmanthius illinoensis, and Dalea pur-
pea) primarily along trails, roadsides,and the railroad)
will take up 20% of the ground plane and will provide
excellent habitat for butterflies for the public to view while
80% of the ground plane will be grasses and other forbs.
The species makeup and maintenance regime for this
complex will be similar to those in the savannah grass-
land (specifically Andropogon geradii, Panicum virgatum,
Schizachrium scoparium, and Sorgastrum nutans. Within
the Native Praire, Bouteloua curtipendula will be estab-
lished, as it is the State Grass of Texas).
Standing and fallen dead wood, when not a threat to
people, will be left for wildlife habitat. People will experi-
ence this landscape on foot, on bike, and car with long
views through grasses and to distant savannahs.
Design Vision
NATIVE PRAIRIE: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
Existing Condition
NATIVE PRAIRIE RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION
Agrostis hyemalis / Spring Bentgrass
Baccharis halimifolia / Eastern False Willow
Elymus virginicus L. / Virginia Wildrye
Asclepias verticillata / Wholred Milkweed
Rudbeckia hirta / Black-eyed Susan
Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass
Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf Pine
Quercus virginiana / Southern Live Oak
Panicum virgatum ‘Cloud Nine’ / Cloud Nine Switchgrass
Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass
Leptochloa dubia / Green sprangletop
Asclepias longifolia / Florida Milkweed
Salvia azurea / Blue Sage
Andropogon ternarius / Splitbeard Bluestem
Pinus taeda / Loblolly Pine
Quercus alba / White oak
Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem
Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass
Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass
Gaillardia pulchella / Indian Blanket
Amsonia illustris / Showy Blue Star
Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem
Quercus falcata / Southern Red Oak
Andropogon / Broomsedge
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
RESTORED WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH
Typical Section
Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
D
There are a number of seasonally and perennially wet
areas within the park. Their state and official designation
remain unknown during the master plan process. Further
exploration of these areas for any design work will be
necessary.
Wet prairie and savannahs, like official wetlands, are criti-
cal to wintering and migrating wildlife as places to nest,
rest, and forage as well as general ecosystem function.
These areas flood seasonally. They will be important for
naturally-occurring stormwater detention. They may be
important areas for educating the public about the func-
tion and importance of wetlands and wet areas and their
place in Texas ecology. Boardwalks and interpretive ar-
eas may intersect with these landscape types.
They have different soil and water properties, and be-
cause of this, their vegetation varies from more dry ar-
eas. They contain more facultative and facultative wet-
land forbs and grasses (Panicum anceps, Paspalum
plicatulum, Paspalum floridanum, Elocharis montana,
Scirpus pungens, Scirpus validus, eg.) and can harbor
trees and shrubs that don’t mind wet feet (Taxodium dis-
tichum, Platanus occidentalis, Nyssa aquatic and sylvat-
ica, Quercus texana, eg.)
The structural characteristics of both the wet savannah
and wet prairie will resemble their dry counterparts in
number of plants per acre.
Design Vision
WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
Existing Condition
WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH RESTORED ECOLOGY
Lythrum alatum / Lance-Leaf Loosestrife
Lobelia puberula / Downy Lobelia
Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens
Nyssa aquatica / Water Tupelo
Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum Betula nigra / River Birch
Paspalum floridanum / Florida PaspalumTripsacum dactyloides / Eastern Gama Grass Nyssa sylvatica / Black Tupelo
Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane
Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush
Scirpus pungens / American Bullrush
Crataegus opaca / Mayhaw
Fraxinus caroliniana / Carolina Buckthorn
Rhexia mairiana L. / Meadowbeauty Sabal minor / Dwarf Palmetto
16 ft.
32 ft.
48 ft.
Paspalum plicatulum / Brownseed Paspalum
Taxodium distichum / Bald Cypress
Panicum anceps / Beaked Panicum Quercus texana / Texas Red Oak
Persea borbonia / Red Bay
Eleocharis montana / Knotty Spike-Rush Scirpus validus / Soft-stem Bullrush
Catalpa bignonoides | Southern Catalpa
F, S
Carya illinoensis | Pecan
F, S, P
Acer negundo | Box Elder
R, B
Quercus falcata | Southern Red Oak
F, S, P
Quercus virginiana | Southern Live Oak
F, S, P
Sassafras albidum | Sassafras
F, S, P
Carya ovata | Shagbark Hickory
F, S, P
Celtis occidentalis | Hackberry
F, S, P
Morus rubra | Red Mulberry
F, S, P
Quercus alba | White oak
F, S, P
Quercus prinus | Chestnut Oak
F, S, P
Quercus stellata | Post Oak
F, S, P
Tilia caroliniana | Carolina Basswood
F, S
Obligate Upland (UPL)
Facultative Upland (FACU)
Facultative (FAC)
Diospyros virginiana | Common
Persimmon F, R
Gleditsia triacanthos | Honey Locust
R
Liquidamber styraciflua | Sweetgum
R
Magnolia grandiflora | Southern
Magnolia F, R
PLANT PALETTE EXAMPLE (TREES)
PARKING & TRANSIT3
338 spaces
20 spaces
90 spaces
292 spaces
216 spaces
20 spaces
22 spaces
34 spaces
28 spaces
120 spaces
228 spaces
50 spaces
48 spaces
76 spaces
75 spaces
484 spaces
177 spaces
54 spaces
90 spaces
11 car spaces
5 bus spaces
56 spaces
83 spaces
106 spaces
185 spaces
PROPOSED PARKING
Dispersed parking lots
provide improved access
to park activities. Parking
along Memorial Loop Road is
removed, allowing for two way
traffic and a more park-like
feeling. Discrete parking areas
now provide access to all parts
of the site.
The proposed parking design
provides greater than
30% increase in parking
capacity.
Existing
Proposed
Legend
Harris County Metropolitan Transit Authority
is currently reconfiguring bus routes to serve
as a grid-based system. Their goal is to
create easier point-to-point access between
all parts of the city. Many lines will have
increased frequencies, and weekend service
will be as frequent as weekday service. One
source: Houston Metro Draft Reimagined Transit Network Map
Northwest Transit Hub Detail
0.9 mi walk from Northwest Transit
Hub to Memorial Park; source:
Google Maps
of the cities largest hubs--the Northwest
Transit Center--will be less than a mile north
of the NW entrance at Memorial Drive.
The design team is conducting a traffic
study that is in progress.
HOUSTON TRANSIT SYSTEM REIMAGINING
NW Transit Center
Memorial Park
EXISTING TRANSIT
Existing 60 minute bus route
Existing 30 minute bus route
Existing 15 minute bus route
Bus stops
Legend
15-minute interval bus routes
rather than 30-minute intervals
running through and adjacent to
the park as well as better stops
would provide better access to
the park for all Houstonians.
PROPOSED TRANSIT CONNECTIONS
Existing 60 minute bus route
Existing 30 minute bus route
Existing 15 minute bus route
Proposed bus stop
Increased frequency route
Existing Bus stops
Legend
Pedestrian connections
The transit vision for the park is
to create hubs where parking,
bus stops, and B-Cycle bike
share stations are clustered
to allow easy transitions from
public transit to on-site bicycle
use.
Proposed 15 min bus route
Existing 60 min bus route
Existing 30 min bus route
Existing 15 min bus route
Bus hub
Bike parking
Existing Bus stops
Legend
B-Cycle station
Pedestrian connections
PROPOSED TRANSIT/BIKE CONNECTIONS
SHEET NUMBER
SHEET TITLE
DESIGNED BY
NO.
REVIEWED BY
DRAWN BY
PROJECT NUMBER
DATE
DATE REVISION
JLP
JLP
DPC
M03-14037-00
PROJECT NAME
MEMORIAL
PARK
P:M03201414072-01MemorialParkTrafficStudyTrafficCadTrafficM03-14072-01-FIGURES.dwgMar03,2015-9:50am
W A L TE R P . M O O RE A N D A S S O CI A TES , IN C .
1 3 0 1 M c K I N N E Y , S U ITE 1100
H O U S T O N , TE X A S 77010
P H ON E : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 .7300 F AX : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0.7396
Copyright C WALTER P. MOORE AND ASSOCIATES, INC.2015
FEBRUARY 2015
N.T.S.
FIGURE 2
2012 HISTORICAL
VOLUMES (FROM
GOOGLE EARTH)
10,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
45,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
2,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
1,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
5,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
55,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
Project Name:
Sheet No.
Sheet Title:
WPMA P.N.:
Date:
Designed by:
Drawn by:
P:M03201414072-01MemorialParkTrafficStudyTrafficCadTrafficM03-14072-01-FIGURES.dwgMar03,2015-9:50am
W A L T E R P . M O O R E A ND A S S OC IA TE S , I NC .
1 3 0 1 M c K I N N E Y , S UITE 1100
H O U S T O N , T E XA S 77010
P H O NE : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 . 7 300 F AX : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 . 7396
Copyright C WALTER P. MOORE AND ASSOCIATES, INC.2015
Drawn by:
MEMORIAL PARK
MARCH 2015
BAB
DPC
N.T.S.
LEGEND:
- UNDER CAPACITY
(LOS A - LOS C)
- AT CAPACITY
(LOS D - LOS E)
- OVER CAPACITY
(LOS F OVER)
X
X
X
-ADJUSTEDEXISTING
-BACKGROUND
-PROPOSED
AA A
AM
AA A
PM
CC C
AM
AA A
PM
XX X
LEVEL OF SERVICE COMPARISON
STORMWATER &
WATER REUSE
4
MEMORIAL PARK MASTERPLAN : INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP : 3-27-2014
SITE ELEVATION
ELEVATION TABLE
ECOLOGICAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: OVERALL PLAN
Objective:
To cleanse stormwater
pavement runoff to remove most
pollutants prior to discharge into
harvesting ponds or the Bayou.
 
Ecological Stormwater Goals:
1. Cleanse the first inch of
stormwater runoff from all
pavement surfaces
2. Manage stormwater using
Low Impact Development (LID)
methods to the extent possible
3. Design irrigation systems to
use the cleansed, harvested
water
4. Enhance the ecological
restoration of the park using the
stormwater system
Collection Ponds
Existing Streams
Treatment Pond
Conveyance Swales
Legend
Detention Areas
ECOLOGICAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: BALLFIELDS
Objective:
To cleanse stormwater
pavement runoff to remove most
pollutants prior to discharge into
harvesting ponds or Bayou.
 
Ecological Stormwater Goals:
1. Install parking lot bio-swales
to intercept surface sheet flows
2. Install parking lot bio-swales
to intercept surface sheet flows
3. Provide water harvesting
pond for irrigation source in this
area
4. Provide detention storage
as required to reduce outlet
flow rate to less than existing
conditions
Collection Ponds
Existing Streams
Conveyance Swales
Legend
MEMORIAL PARK MASTERPLAN : INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP : 3-27-2014
STORMWATER EXISTING
EXISTING WATER USE
MAJOR IRRIGATION USE:
Golf Course: 59 million gal/yr
(= 181 acres covered by 1 foot of water)
Polo Field: 10 million gal/yr
(= 30 acres covered by 1 foot of water)
Sports Field: 16 million gal/yr
(= 48 acres covered by 1 foot of water)
Lesser water use areas
Existing Streams
Largest water use
Legend
STORMWATER REUSE STRATEGY
Objective:
Reduce park potable water
irrigation use with rain water
collected on site (and north of
the park)
 
Watershed Phases:
Water collection from the
following watersheds will offset
irrigation demand as modeled:
GC1 = 48% golf course demand
GC1+GC2 = 54% golf course
demand
GC1+GC2+GC3 = 100% golf
course demand
Ballfields = 50% offset
Eastern Glades = 75% offset
Collection Ponds
Existing Streams
Treatment Pond
Legend
Golf Course Watersheds
Eastern Glades Watershed
Ballfields Watershed
PROPOSED PLAN
Memorial Park Tomorrow,
a Place for all Houstonians
5
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Running Center and Timing Track
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Land Bridge
Bayou Wilds
MASTER PLAN
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Running Center and Timing Track
Land Bridge
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Running Center and Timing Track
Land Bridge
WOODWAY
WEST
MEMORIAL
ARNOT
EAST
MEMORIAL
WASHINGTON / WESTCOTT
MAIN ENTRANCES
Artist's Rendering at I-610 and the Old Archery Range
WOODWAY ENTRANCE
Section looking East toward I-610 from the Old Archery Range
Detail
WOODWAY ENTRANCE
Detail
Section looking East into the park
WEST MEMORIAL DRIVE AT I-610
ARTIST'S RENDERING: WEST ENTRANCE AT WOODWAY DR.
Section looking West into the park
ARNOT ENTRANCE
Artist's Rendering toward Memorial Drive between Crestwood and Memorial Loop Rd.
EAST MEMORIAL DRIVE ENTRANCE
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
LAND BRIDGE & RUNNING CENTER
LAND BRIDGE
RUNNING CENTER &
TIMING TRACK
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - LAND BRIDGE & RUNNING CENTER
(Left) Precedent: wildlife bridge, Bukit, Timah, Singapore
(Top) Precedent: path in a prairie complex
(Bottom) Precedent: Nike headquarters woodland track, Beaverton , OR
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING:
LAND BRIDGE
ARTIST'S RENDERING: RUNNING TRAIL CENTER
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Running Center and Timing Track
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Trailhead
Land Bridge
BAYOU WILDS
BAYOU WILDS
PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILS
1” = 500’
250’0’ 500’ 1000’
PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILS
1” = 500’
250’0’ 500’ 1000’
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
01
02
03
04
04
03
02
01
Buffalo Bayou
Southern Arc Path (natural surface)
Trail Heads
Parking
02
05
06
05
Mountain Bike Trails (natural surface)
Hiking Trails (natural surface)
06
(Left) Boardwalk Precedent
(Top) Precedent: mountain biking trails
(Bottom) Precedent: Hardberger Park, San Antonio, TX
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS' SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL
ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS HIKING TRAIL
ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS BIKING TRAIL
PARKING LOT CROSSING
CONNECTIONONLYTHROUGHSLT
CONNECTION ON NORTH SIDE OF ROAD ONLY THROUGH SLT
Multi Use Trail
Bridle Trails
Arboretum Trails
Outer Loop
Tex-DOT Trail
Cycle Track (picnic loop)
Seymour Lieberman Trail
1000’0’ 2000’
EXISTING TRAIL NETWORK
Proposed Trail Network:
1000’0’ 2000’
PROPOSED TRAIL NETWORK
Seymour Lieberman Trail
Running Track
Multi-Use Trails
Cycle Track
Natural Surface Hiking Trails
Natural Surface Mountain Bike Trails
Equestrian Trails
Equestrian and Pedestrian Trails
Boardwalks
Bayou Access
Legend
Bayou Boat Route
EXISTING PROGRAM FOOTPRINT IN BAYOU WILDS
MaiMaiMaintententenannannanna cecece CenCenCenterterter
PicPicPicnicnicnic ArArAreaeaeae
RunRunRunninninning Cg Cg Cg entententererer
BalBalBall Fl Fl Fielielieldsdsds
TurTurTurf Gf Gf Grasrasassss
ParParkinkinggg
&&& RoaRoaRoaddd
SoSoSoS utututhhh SiSiSidedede 19191919,9,9,9,942424242 8,8,886969699
RuRuRuRunnnnnnnnininingggg CeCeCentntntnterererer 77779,9,9,,090909777 sfsfsfsf
MaMaMaininintetetenananancncnceee AArAreaeaeaa 333388888,3,333252525 ssssffff
PiPiPiP cncncnicicic AAAArererereaaaa 2222,3,3232333,1,111000000 ssssffff
BaBaBallllll FFFFieieieldldlddss 55545454545,3,3,338383838 sssfff
TuTuTT rfrf GGGGrarar sssssss 414141419,9,9,373737888 sfsfsf
PaPaPaP rkrkrkkini gggg +++ RoRoRoRoadadad 222383838,7,75454 ssff
RunRunninning Cg Cententerer
MaiMaintentenannancece AreAreaa
NewNew PaParkirk ngngg
BayBayyouou WilWilWildsdsds TraTraTrailhilhi eadeadea
AreAreaa
11/4 MiMilele TraT ckk
PROPOSED PROGRAM FOOTPRINT IN BAYOU WILDS
SouSouthth SidSidee 19199,94,94,942,82,869699 sf
RunRunninninning Cg Cg ententerer 799,09,09,097 s7 s7 fff
MaiMaintentenannanancecece AreAreeaaa 38388388,32,32,325 s5 sff
Newew PaPaP rkirkinngn 20520205,42228 s8 s8 sff
Bayayouou WilWildsds TraTraTrailhilhheaeae 3737376,11828282 sfsf
1/41/41/4 MiMilelele TraTrackckk 5656,89,89898 s8 sff
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Running Center and Timing Track
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Land Bridge
BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
12
12
11
11
10
10
09
09
08
08
07
07
06
06
05
05
05
04 04
04
03
03
02
02
01
01
Southern Arc Trail
Observation Tower
Climbing Walls
Nature Playground
Childrens' Biking Loop (hard surface)
Childrens' Biking Loop (natural surface)
Trail Heads
Pump Track
Picnic Areas
Pavilion
Parking
Land Bridge
(Left) Ateliereen Tower, Dalfsen Holland
(Top) Precedent: Dinton Pastures Nature Playground, Wokingham UK
(Bottom) Precedent: Cow Hollow nature playground, San Francisco CA
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
ARTIST'S RENDERING: LOOKOUT TOWER OVER SAVANNAH
ARTIST'S RENDERING: KIDS' BIKE LOOP
Running Center and Timing Track
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Family Recreation Area
Land Bridge
Running Center and Timing Track
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Family Recreation Area
Land Bridge
BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS
BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS
Southern Arc Trail
Observation Tower
Buffalo Bayou
Mountain bike trails (natural surface)
01
01 02
02
03
03
04
04
05
06
Hiking Trails (natural surface)05
Bayou boardwalk overlook (wood)0605
ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU OVERLOOK
AERIAL ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIONS
Waterfowl Flyways of North America Boreal Bird Flyways of North America
Image: University of Texas Library, Boreal Songbird Institute
Houston
Houston
BAYOU EDGE
Sedge Wren & American Pipit
White Ibis
Red-Eared Slider Turtle
WELL-DRAINED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Summer Tanager
MATURE
MIXED
BOTTOMLAND
FOREST
Pileated Woodpecker
Five-Lined Skink
Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat
Target Wildlife &
Ecological Zones:
BAYOU to WOODLAND
1” = 400’
200’0’ 400’ 800’
1” = 40’
20’0’ 40’ 80’12’
boardwalk
4’-0” natural
surface
hiking trail
Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
Prothonotary Warbler
Wood Thrush
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Swallow-Tailed Kite
Context Map & Trail Design
Section A: Southern Arc Trail
A
Railroad
I-610/Katy
Memorial Dr.
Crestwood
Buffalo B
ayou
SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
PINE-DOMINATED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Mississippi Kite
Red-Tailed Hawk
Northern Scarlet Snake
Slender Glass Lizard
Brown-Headed Nuthatch
1” = 400’
200’0’ 400’ 800’
1” = 40’
20’0’ 40’ 80’12’ natural
surface trail
Context Map & Trail Design
Section B: Southern Arc Trail
Target Wildlife &
Ecological Zones:
PINE to MIXED WOODLAND
WELL-DRAINED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Summer Tanager
Pileated Woodpecker
Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
Wood Thrush
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Swallow-Tailed Kite
SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
Railroad
I-610/Katy
Memorial Dr.
Crestwood
Buffalo B
ayou
B
1” = 400’
200’0’ 400’ 800’
1” = 40’
20’0’ 40’ 80’12’
boardwalk
Context Map & Trail Design
Section C: Southern Arc Trail
Target Wildlife &
Ecological Zones:
BARRANCO
WELL-DRAINED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Summer Tanager
Pileated Woodpecker
Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
Wood Thrush
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Swallow-Tailed Kite
4' natural
surface trail
BARRANCO
Sedge Wren & American Pipit
White Ibis
Red-Eared Slider Turtle
Five-Lined Skink
Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat
Prothonotary Warbler
SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
Railroad
I-610/Katy
Memorial Dr.
Crestwood
Buffalo B
ayou
C
1” = 400’
200’0’ 400’ 800’
1” = 40’
20’0’ 40’ 80’
Context Map & Trail Design
Section D: Southern Arc Trail
Target Wildlife &
Ecological Zones:
SAVANNAH TO WOODLAND
WELL-DRAINED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Summer Tanager
Pileated Woodpecker
Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
Wood Thrush
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Swallow-Tailed Kite
HARDWOOD
SAVANNAH
Eastern Towhee
Savannah Sparrow
Henslow’s Sparrow
Mississippi Kite
Red-Tailed Hawk
12’ natural
surface trail
4’-0” natural
surface hiking
trail
SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
Railroad
I-610/Katy
Memorial Dr.
Crestwood
Buffalo B
ayou
D
1” = 400’
200’0’ 400’ 800’
1” = 40’
20’0’ 40’ 80’
Context Map & Trail Design
Section F: Southern Arc Trail
Target Wildlife &
Ecological Zones:
PRAIRIE TO WOODLAND
WELL-DRAINED
MIXED
WOODLAND
Red-Headed Woodpecker
Summer Tanager
Pileated Woodpecker
Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
Wood Thrush
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Swallow-Tailed Kite
12’ natural
surface trail
4’-0” natural
surface mountain
bike trail (course)
Indigo Bunting
Le Conte’s SparrowField Sparrow
Bachman’s Sparrow
White-Tailed Hawk WOODLAND
EDGE
White Throated Sparrow
Eastern Towhee
PRAIRIE
SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
Railroad
I-610/Katy
Memorial Dr.
Crestwood
Buffalo B
ayou
F
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Running Center and Timing Track
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Running Center and Timing Track
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
EASTERN GLADES
EASTERN GLADES
GENERAL PLAY AREA
BASEBALL ECT.
GARDEN
BRIDAL PATHS &
WALKS THROUGH
NATIVE WOODS
RIVER OAKS COUNTRY CLUB
NURSERYPRIVATEPROPERTY
PRESENT PROPERTY LINE
APPROXIMATE LOCATION
OF GOLF COURSE
Cultivated Garden
Presumed High-Use Areas
Presumed Lower-Use Areas
Legend
PARK'S FOUNDING MASTER PLAN
1924 Proposed Entry &
Gardens, golf course, and
scenic roads by Hare & Hare
Landscape Architects.
Approved during the time of
the park's founders.
Although many parts of the
plan were never built, the
proposed organization of
spaces remain relevant and
culturally significant.
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - EASTERN GLADES
07
07
06
06
06
06
05
05
05
05
05
04
04
03
03
02
02
01
01
Seymour Lieberman Trail
Multi-use trail
Parking
Pond and Cypress Grove
Pond Esplanade
Eastern Garden Glade
Eastern Glade
(Left) Precedent: Villa Borghese, Rome, Italy
(Above) Precedent: Forsyth Park, Savannah, GA
(Above) Precedent: Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING: EASTERN GLADES
ARTIST'S RENDERING: EASTERN GLADES
ARTIST'S RENDERING: EASTERN GLADES
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Trails and
Preserve
Land Bridge
Running Center & Timing Track
TENNIS, FITNESS & NATATORIUM
FITNESS / NATATORIUM
TENNIS CENTER
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - TENNIS CENTER, FITNESS AND NATATORIUM
08
09
09
08
07
07
06
06
04
04
03
03
02
02
01
01
01
Golf Course
Seymour Lieberman Trail
Multi-use Trail
Memorial Loop Drive
Natatorium (Indoor Swimming)
Fitness Center
Tennis Courts
Parking
10 Dense perimeter planting
10
10
11 Haskell Street
12 Arnot Street
12
11
13
13 Crestwood Drive
PRECEDENTS: (TOP) SALINAS MUNI. AQUATIC CENTER (BOTTOM) BEIJING AQUATIC CENTRE
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Memorial Groves
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
SPORTS COMPLEX
Sports Complex
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Softball field
Baseball field
Pond
Driving Range
Croquet Court
Golf Clubhouse
Soccer Field
Volleyball Court
SLT
Multi-use trail
Parking
01
01
01
01
01
01
02 02
03
03
04
04
05
05
06
06
07
07
08
08
09
09
10
11
11
11
11
10
10
Picnic area12
12
11
11
Rugby Pitch13
13
03
03
03
1” = 300’
150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - SPORTS COMPLEX
ARTIST'S RENDERING - SPORTS COMPLEX
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Rugby Pitch
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
Sports Complex
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Rugby Pitch
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
Sports Complex
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
MEMORIAL GROVES
MEMORIAL GROVES
Memorial Groves Pine Planting
Large Group Picnic Area
Existing Motts
Picnic Areas
SLT
Multi-use trail
Memorial Loop Drive
Parallel Parking and Accessway
Golf Course
09
09
08
08
07
07
06
06
05
05
05
04
04
03
03
03
02
02
02
02
01
01
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - MEMORIAL GROVES PINE PLANTING
(Left) Precedent: pine grove
(Top) Hardberger Park picnic area, San Antonio, TX
(Bottom) Existing Camp Logan latrine foundation, Memorial Park
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING: MEMORIAL GROVE
ARTIST'S RENDERING: MEMORIAL GROVE
HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPH OF CAMP LOGAN CIRCA 1918
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
Sports Complex
Memorial Grove
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Rugby Pitch
OAR
Bayou Wilds
CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS
CYCLE TRACK
AND TRAILS
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
PLAN - CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS
1” = 250’
125’0’ 250’ 500’
04
05
05
04
03
03
03
02
02
01
01
Memorial Drive
Multi-use trails
Equestrian/Hiking Trails
Cycle Track
Parking
PLAN - CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS
(Left) Precedent: Central Park Trail bridge, New York, NY
(Top) Precedent: Equestrian trails
(Bottom) Precedent: hard surface cycle track
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
ARTIST'S RENDERING: CYCLE TRACK
Trailhead
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Rugby Pitch
Bayou Wilds
Cycle Track and Trails
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
Sports Complex
Memorial Grove
OAR
OLD ARCHERY RANGE (OAR)
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
04
07
05
04
03
03
02
02
01
01
Orientation Point
Pedestrian Bridge
Bayou Access
Parking
Entrance off Woodway
04 04
07
06
I-610
Observation Tower
05
06
1” = 300’
150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - OLD ARCHERY RANGE
(Left) Precedent: Lookout Tower, Tiree, Scotland
(Top) Precedent: Birkshire Boardwalk, Stockbridge, MA
(Bottom) Precedent: Bronx River Alliance, Bronx, NY
PRECEDENT PROJECTS
PRECEDENT: YOUTH BOAT BUILDING PROGRAMS
Trailhead
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Rugby Pitch
Bayou Wilds
HOGG BIRD
SANCTUARY
Cycle Track and Trails
Running Center & Timing Track
Land Bridge
Sports Complex
Memorial Grove
OAR
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
HOGG BIRD SANCTUARY
04
05
04
03
03
02
02
01
01
Restored Bird Habitat
Natural Surface Trails
Existing Parking Lot
Westcott St.
Memorial Drive
06 Garden Club of Houston Project
05
06
04
1” = 300’
150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - HOGG BIRD SANCTUARY
¥
¥
Project Objectives:
To restore a section of Hogg
Bird Sanctuary by removing
exotic invasive plants and
replanting with appropriate
native species to create healthy
habitat for birds and other
wildlife.
To educate the Houston
community about habitat
restoration and its importance to
birds.
GARDEN CLUB OF HOUSTON HOGG BIRD PROJECT (IN PROGRESS)
ARTIST'S RENDERING: HOGG BIRD WALKING TRAIL
1” = 1000’
500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
Trailhead
Maintenance Area
Eastern Glades
Fitness Center/Natatorium
Tennis Center
Golf Course
Memorial Groves
Rugby Pitch
Sports Complex
OAR
Cycle Track and Trails
Bayou Wilds
Hogg Bird Sanctuary
MASTER PLAN
Running Center and Timing Track
Land Bridge
ARTIST'S RENDERING:
LAND BRIDGE
•
•
•
www.memorialparktomorrow.org
Public Meeting Recap for Memorial Park Plan

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Public Meeting Recap for Memorial Park Plan

  • 1. PUBLICUPDATEMEETING4 THE PROPOSED PLAN: APLACEFORALLHOUSTONIANS Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Brown Auditorium March 9, 2015 6:30–8:30 pm
  • 2.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6.
  • 8. MEMORIAL PARK MARCH 2015 PUBLIC MEETING "The Proposed Plan: Memorial Park Tomorrow"
  • 9. RECAP ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PARKING & TRANSIT STORMWATER & WATER REUSE PROPOSED PLAN 1 2 3 4 5
  • 11. MAR APRMAY MAYJUN JUNJUL JULAUG SEP SEPOCT OCTNOV NOVDEC DECJAN FEB 2013 20142014 2015 Public Input & Research Master Planning MPC + Uptown Houston + HPARD Interview Process Programming & Public Input DesignTeam Selection MAR APRJAN FEB We are here AUG GuidingPrinciples Presentation PublicMeeting InitialDesignConcepts PublicMeeting FinalDesignPresentation PublicMeeting WhatGoesWhere
  • 12. PUBLIC INPUT GUIDING PRINCIPLES RESEARCH Berg Oliver (Ecology) John Jacob (Soils) Hunt Design (Wayfinding) Sherwood Design Engineers (Civil Engineering) Susan Turner Associates (History) The Lighting Practice (Lighting) ETM Associates (O & M) Ecotech Panel Memorial Park Conservancy Uptown TIRZ Houston Parks and Recreation Department CLIENT INPUT PUBLIC INPUT GUIDING PRINCIPLES RESEARCH Berg Oliver (Ecology) John Jacob (Soils) Hunt Design (Wayfinding) Sherwood Design Engineers (Civil Engineering) Susan Turner Associates (History) The Lighting Practice (Lighting) ETM Associates (O & M) Ecotech Panel Memorial Park Conservancy Uptown TIRZ Houston Parks and Recreation Department CLIENT INPUT PUBLIC INPUT GUIDING PRINCIPLES RESEARCH Berg Oliver (Ecology) John Jacob (Soils) Hunt Design (Wayfinding) Sherwood Design Engineers (Civil Engineering) Susan Turner Associates (History) The Lighting Practice (Lighting) ETM Associates (O & M) Ecotech Panel Memorial Park Conservancy Uptown TIRZ Houston Parks and Recreation Department CLIENT INPUT
  • 13. ENGAGING HOUSTONIANS IN THE MASTER PLAN PROCESS The master planning team has engaged 2,950 participants in public process via public meetings, online input, and focused workshops. 860 participants Joined seven public meetings 1,829 participants Engaged online 258 participants Joined twenty focused workshops
  • 14. A PARK FOR ALL HOUSTONIANS A recent survey of 774 runners using Memorial Park showed that people had come from 134 different zip codes, all across Houston to use the park.
  • 15. RECONNECT... the land, waterways, trails, people, and memories. CONSOLIDATE... compatible uses together in appropriate areas. RESTORE... the ecology of the park and our connection to it. ENHANCE... the overall park experience and its amenities. TEND... the land and our cultural history, and through responsible management, maintain balance. GUIDING PRINCIPLES
  • 16. 3 17 19 18 20 21 22 15 16 1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 7 5 13 11 12 14 23 25 Over time, the park has been divided into many discontiguous parts. EXISTING CONDITION: DIVIDED PARK
  • 17. VISION: RECONNECTED PARK Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
  • 18. EXISTING CONDITION: IMPACTED PARK Legend Water features Previously Impacted areas Altered Buffalo Bayou Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
  • 19. VISION: LIMIT AREAS OF FUTURE IMPACT TO THOSE ALTERED BY PAST DEVELOPMENT Legend Previously Impacted areas Cultural Resources Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
  • 20. EXISTING CONDITION: PROGRAM AREAS SMALL AND FRAGMENTED Legend Active recreation Arboretum and Nature Center Urban Wilderness (trail use) Picnic Area Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
  • 21. VISION: COHESIVE PARK PROGRAM AND EXPERIENCES Legend Active recreation Urban wilderness (trail use) Arboretum and Nature Center Relocated active recreation Historical Resources Dispersed picnic areas Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates
  • 22. EXISTING CONDITION: CORRIDOR ROADBLOCKS & SCATTERED PROGRAM Riparian Forest Pine-Hardwood Forest Pine-Hardwood Savannah Native Prairie Naturalized Golf Course Ponds and Stream Corridors Wet Savannah and Pairie Bog Areas Legend Riparian Forest Pine-Hardwood Forest Pine-Hardwood Savannah Native Prairie Naturalized Golf Course Ponds and Stream Corridors Wet Savannah and Pairie Bog Areas Legend
  • 23. The design seeks to reconnect ecological corridors. Continuous flows of water, wildlife, and plant communities will be restored through restoration of four habitat types: 1. Riparian forests 2. Pine/Hardwood Forests 3. Savannah landscapes 4. Discrete Native Prairie VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION Riparian Forest Pine-Hardwood Forest Pine-Hardwood Savannah Native Prairie Naturalized Golf Course Ponds and Stream Corridors Wet Savannah and Pairie Bog Areas Legend
  • 25. The park's vegetation has changed from a dominant composition of forest to savannah. While this marks a radical shift from the past 50 years, it is beginning to return to a landscape that would have been familiar to the Karankawa: one that is more resilient to fluctuating weather patterns and more hospitable to a diverse mix of fauna. EXISTING VEGETATION - ONGOING BERG OLIVER SITE INVESTIGATION (ENVIRO. SCIENTISTS) Savannah Forest Prairie Legend
  • 26. The design team has been working with local ecological consultant Berg Oliver Associates to refine this vision and define the steps that it would take to make the restoration a reality. VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION Riparian Forest Pine-Hardwood Forest Pine-Hardwood Savannah Native Prairie Naturalized Golf Course Ponds and Stream Corridors Wet Savannah and Pairie Bog Areas Legend
  • 27. FOREST 100-150 trees/acre 25% shrubs 25% herbaceous SAVANNAH 50 trees/acre 20% shrubs 70% herbaceous PRAIRIE 5-10 trees/acre 20% shrubs 80% herbaceous DISTINGUISHING FOREST, SAVANNAH, AND PRAIRIE
  • 28. I-610/KatyFreeway Buffalo Bayou Buffalo Bayou River Oaks Country Club ADVANCED ECOLOGY'S INITIAL VEGETATION ASSESSMENT Overstory canopy trees over 6" diameter trunk at breast height Old Archery Range (OAR) Hogg Bird Sanctuary
  • 29. Midstory Species 12’ - 25’ Understory Species < 12 feet exotic invasives native invasives natives Overstory Species > 25’ native invasives exotic invasives native exoticinvasives native invasives natives: <0.25% A.E.L. (ADVANCED ECOLOGY, LTD) INITIAL INVASIVE SPECIES ASSESSMENT
  • 30. Austin Beaumont Brownsville McAllen Bryan Corpus Christi Galveston Houston Lake Charles Laredo Lufkin San Antonio Victoria Temple Big Thicket National Preserve Padre Island National Seashore Matamoros Reynosa Kingsville Kerrville e Llano 34 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 32c 29e 33b 35e 35e33f 33f 33f 33f 30b 33c 33b 30c 33b 35f 35f35b35f32b 32b 34a 34a 33e 33b 34a 34g 33b 34c 34c 34c 34c 32c 32b 34g 34a 34a 31c 31a 34h 34a 34h 31d 31d 34b 34h 34h 34i 34i 34i 34d 34e 34f 32a 34h 34h 34b 32c 33b 33c 32c 34a Colorado ver Neches River Guadalupe S an Antoni o River River River River a River BrazosRiver Grande G U L F O F M E X I C O N ue ces River LagunaMadre Lake Livingston ReservoirSam Rayburn Res. Lake Conroe Matagorda Bay Galveston Bay Falcon Reservoir re Pedernales River o River Navasota River SabineRiver Frio R iver ON 26° 27° 28° 29° 30° 31° SCALE 1:2 500 000 60102030 120 mi0 120 240 km0204060 this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak sa wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe jun 3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disju predominantly prairie potential natural vegeta and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass p Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blu of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and industrial uses. Typical game species include Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the T several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie typ shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant com many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in som prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone, The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly differen Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enc domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities. Austin Beaumont Brownsville McAllen Bryan Corpus Christi Galveston Houston Lake Charles Laredo Lufkin San Antonio Victoria Temple Big Thicket National Preserve Padre Island National Seashore Matamoros Reynosa Kingsville Kerrville e Llano 34 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 32c 29e 33b 35e 35e33f 33f 33f 33f 30b 33c 33b 30c 33b 35f 35f35b35f32b 32b 34a 34a 33e 33b 34a 34g 33b 34c 34c 34c 34c 32c 32b 34g 34a 34a 31c 31a 34h 34a 34h 31d 31d 34b 34h 34h 34i 34i 34i 34d 34e 34f 32a 34h 34h 34b 32c 33b 33c 32c 34a Colorado ver Neches River Guadalupe S an Antoni o River River River River a River BrazosRiver Grande G U L F O F M E X I C O N ue ces River LagunaMadre Lake Livingston ReservoirSam Rayburn Res. Lake Conroe Matagorda Bay Galveston Bay Falcon Reservoir re Pedernales River o River Navasota River SabineRiver Frio R iver ON 26° 27° 28° 29° 30° 31° SCALE 1:2 500 000 60102030 120 mi0 120 240 km0204060 this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak sa wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe jun 3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disju predominantly prairie potential natural vegeta and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass p Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blu of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and industrial uses. Typical game species include Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the T several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie typ shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant com many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in som prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone, The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly differen Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enc domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities. PRINCIPAL AUTHORS: Glenn E. Griffith (Dynamac Corporation), Sandra A. Bryce (Dynamac Corporation), James M. Omernik (USGS), Jeffrey A. Comstock (Indus Corporation), Anne C. Rogers (TCEQ), Bill Harrison (TCEQ), Stephen L. Hatch (Texas A&M University), and David Bezanson (Natural Area Preservation Association). COLLABORATORS AND CONTRIBUTORS: Philip A. Crocker (USEPA), Art Crowe (TCEQ), Micheal Golden (NRCS), Susan Casby-Horton (NRCS), James Greenwade (NRCS), Conrad Neitsch (NRCS), Shannen S. Chapman (Dynamac Corporation), Augie De La Cruz (TCEQ), Kevin Wagner (Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board [TSSWCB]), Richard Egg (TSSWCB), Alan J. Woods (Oregon State University), Clark Hubbs (University of Texas), David L. Certain (The Nature Conservancy) and Thomas R. Loveland (USGS). REVIEWERS: Charles T. Hallmark (Texas A&M University), Gordon Linam (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department [TPWD]), Milo Pyne (NatureServe), Judy Teague (NatureServe), and Raymond C. Telfair II (TPWD). CITING THIS POSTER: Griffith, G.E., Bryce, S.A., Omernik, J.M., Comstock, J.A., Rogers, A.C., Harrison, B., Hatch, S.L., and Bezanson, D., 2004, Ecoregions of Texas (color poster with map, descriptive text, and photographs): Reston, Virginia, U.S. Geological Survey (map scale 1:2,500,000). This project was partially supported by funds from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region VI, Regional Applied Research Effort Austin Oklahoma City Santa Fe Abilene Albuquerque Amarillo Beaumont Brownsville McAllen Bryan Carlsbad Corpus Christi Dallas Del Rio El Paso Fort Smith Fort Worth Galveston Hot Springs Houston Lake Charles Laredo Las Cruces Longview Lubbock Lufkin Midland Nacogdoches Odessa Pecos Roswell San Angelo San Antonio Sherman Shreveport Texarkana Clovis Tulsa Tyler Victoria Waco Temple Wichita Falls Ciudad Juarez Guadalupe Mtns. National Park Big Thicket National Preserve Padre Island National Seashore Big Bend National Park Matamoros Reynosa Nuevo Laredo Ciudad Acuña Arlington Denton Paris Big Spring Kingsville Brownwood Fort Stockton Kerrville Norman Lawton Uvalde Llano 25 26 39 22 38 23 23 23 23 37 36 35 35 34 23 29 27 25 26 21 21 24 40 28 35 33 37 39 24 25e 26a 26a 25b 26a 26a 26d 25i 27h 26c 26c 27h 26b 26b 27h 26b 25j 27i 35g 35g 29b 29b 29c 35c 35c 35c 35a 33a 29d 35c 26b 32a 25j 27h 26b 33d 33d 33d 33d 35a 27j 33f 33f 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 35b 25j 35a 26b 29f 33d 25k 26b 25j 33f 32c 32c 35a 30d 24a 29e 24b 24a 23b 23a 24a 30d 33b24c 24d 24d 35e 35e 24e 24e 24c 24c 30a 24c 24d 24b 24b 24e 33f 33f 33f 33f 30b 33 c 33b 30c 24b 33b 35f 35f 24d 24b 35b35f32b 24c 24a 32b 34a 34a 33e 33b 34a 34g 33b 34c 34c 34c 34c 31b 32c 32b 34g 34a 34a 31c 31a 34h 34a 34h 31d 31d 31d 34b 34h 34h 34i 34i 34i 34d 34e 34f 24d 24d 24d 32a 24d 24c 24d 24d 34h 34h 34b 32c 33b 33 c 35c 25b 24d 35a 35c 32c 24b 34a Colorado Sabine Trin ityRiver Neches River River Guadalupe Peco s River Canadian River S an Antoni o River River River R io Red River Red River Leon River Llano River San Saba River BrazosRiver R io Grande Grande G U L F O F M E X I C O Lake Arrowhead N ue ces River LagunaMadre Cim arron Riv er Arkansa s R iver Lake Livingston Toledo Bend ReservoirSam Rayburn Res. Lake Conroe Matagorda Bay Galveston Bay Cedar Creek Res. Lake Tawakoni Lewisville Lake Falcon Reservoir Lake Texoma LagunaMadre Lake Meredith Amistad Reservoir Laguna de Guzmán Pedernales River Colorado River Br azos River Canadian River Navasota River SabineRiver Wichi ta River Paluxy River Frio R iver RiverSulphur Pecos River KANSAS OKLAHOMA ARKANSAS LOUISIANA MISSOURI COLORADO NEWMEXICO UN ITED ST AT ES MEX ICO NUEV O LE ON TA M AU LI PA S COAHUILA CH IH UAHUA 107° 107° 106° 106° 105° 105° 104° 104° 103° 103° 102° 102° 101° 101° 100° 100° 99° 99° 98° 98° 97° 97° 96° 96° 95° 95° 94° 94° 93° 25° 25° 26° 26° 27° 27° 28° 28° 29° 29° 30° 30° 31° 31° 32° 32° 33° 33° 34° 34° 35° 35° 36° 36° 37° 37° SCALE 1:2 500 000 Albers equal area projection Standard parallels 27˚ 30' N and 34˚ 30' N 60102030 120 mi0 120 240 km0204060 23 Arizona/New Mexico Mountains 23a Chihuahuan Desert Slopes 23b Montane Woodlands 24 Chihuahuan Deserts 24a Chihuahuan Basins and Playas 24b Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands 24c Low Mountains and Bajadas 24d Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands 24e Stockton Plateau 25 High Plains 25b Rolling Sand Plains 25e Canadian/Cimarron High Plains 25i Llano Estacado 25j Shinnery Sands 25k Arid Llano Estacado 26 Southwestern Tablelands 26a Canadian/Cimarron Breaks 26b Flat Tablelands and Valleys 26c Caprock Canyons, Badlands, and Breaks 26d Semiarid Canadian Breaks 27 Central Great Plains 27h Red Prairie 27i Broken Red Plains 27j Limestone Plains 29 Cross Timbers 29b Eastern Cross Timbers 29c Western Cross Timbers 29d Grand Prairie 29e Limestone Cut Plain 29f Carbonate Cross Timbers 30 Edwards Plateau 30a Edwards Plateau Woodland 30b Llano Uplift 30c Balcones Canyonlands 30d Semiarid Edwards Plateau 31 Southern Texas Plains 31a Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains 31b Semiarid Edwards Bajada 31c Texas-Tamaulipan Thornscrub 31d Rio Grande Floodplain and Terraces 32 Texas Blackland Prairies 32a Northern Blackland Prairie 32b Southern Blackland Prairie 32c Floodplains and Low Terraces 33 East Central Texas Plains 33a Northern Post Oak Savanna 33b Southern Post Oak Savanna 33c San Antonio Prairie 33d Northern Prairie Outliers 33e Bastrop Lost Pines 33f Floodplains and Low Terraces 34 Western Gulf Coastal Plain 34a Northern Humid Gulf Coastal Prairies 34b Southern Subhumid Gulf Coastal Prairies 34c Floodplains and Low Terraces 34d Coastal Sand Plain 34e Lower Rio Grande Valley 34f Lower Rio Grande Alluvial Floodplain 34g Texas-Louisiana Coastal Marshes 34h Mid-Coast Barrier Islands and Coastal Marshes 34i Laguna Madre Barrier Islands and Coastal Marshes 35 South Central Plains 35a Tertiary Uplands 35b Floodplains and Low Terraces 35c Pleistocene Fluvial Terraces 35e Southern Tertiary Uplands 35f Flatwoods 35g Red River Bottomlands Level III ecoregion Level IV ecoregion County boundary State boundary International boundary 2 77 1 1 4 9 3 11 17 78 50 18 47 5352 17 57 56 62 13 67 67 19 6 5 25 62 44 21 57 54 7 64 55 70 69 63 27 27 72 20 40 40 1 45 26 71 65 28 22 39 66 68 8 73 73 74 63 29 6 38 25 37 36 35 23 32 49 46 48 50 51 23 24 79 33 10 15 41 58 42 43 59 83 58 60 42 17 82 58 84 65 66 61 16 81 12 14 80 1 Coast Range 2 Puget Lowland 3 Willamette Valley 4 Cascades 5 Sierra Nevada 6 Southern and Central California Chaparral and Oak Woodlands 7 Central California Valley 8 Southern California Mountains 9 Eastern Cascades Slopes and Foothills 10 Columbia Plateau 11 Blue Mountains 12 Snake River Plain 13 Central Basin and Range 14 Mojave Basin and Range 15 Northern Rockies 16 Idaho Batholith 17 Middle Rockies 18 Wyoming Basin 19 Wasatch and Uinta Mountains 20 Colorado Plateaus 21 Southern Rockies 22 Arizona/New Mexico Plateau 23 Arizona/New Mexico Mountains 29 Cross Timbers 30 Edwards Plateau 31 Southern Texas Plains 32 Texas Blackland Prairies 33 East Central Texas Plains 34 Western Gulf Coastal Plain 35 South Central Plains 36 Ouachita Mountains 37 Arkansas Valley 38 Boston Mountains 39 Ozark Highlands 40 Central Irregular Plains 41 Canadian Rockies 42 Northwestern Glaciated Plains 43 Northwestern Great Plains 44 Nebraska Sand Hills 45 Piedmont 46 Northern Glaciated Plains 47 Western Corn Belt Plains 48 Lake Agassiz Plain 49 Northern Minnesota Wetlands 50 Northern Lakes and Forests 51 North Central Hardwood Forests 52 Driftless Area 57 Huron/Erie Lake Plains 58 Northeastern Highlands 59 Northeastern Coastal Zone 60 Northern Appalachian Plateau and Uplands 61 Erie Drift Plain 62 North Central Appalachians 63 Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain 64 Northern Piedmont 65 Southeastern Plains 66 Blue Ridge 67 Ridge and Valley 68 Southwestern Appalachians 69 Central Appalachians 70 Western Allegheny Plateau 71 Interior Plateau 72 Interior River Valleys and Hills 73 Mississippi Alluvial Plain 74 Mississippi Valley Loess Plains 75 Southern Coastal Plain 76 Southern Florida Coastal Plain 77 North Cascades 78 Klamath Mountains 79 Madrean Archipelago Level III Ecoregions of the Conterminous United States 2 5 . H i g h P l a i n s Higher and drier than the Central Great Plains (27 Great Plains (43) to the north, much of the High Grama-buffalograss is the potential natural veget savanna to the south, and taller grasses to the east wheat and sorghum and the southern limit of sprin 3 0 . E d w a r d s P l a t e a This ecoregion is largely a dissected limestone pla regions by a sharp fault line. The region contains substrate) and resulting underground drainage, str this region are mostly Mollisols with shallow and by juniper-oak savanna and mesquite-oak savann wildlife. Hunting leases are a major source of vegetation patterns on the Edwards Plateau. It i browsers, and in the absence of fire, Ashe juniper 3 4 . W e s t e r n G u l f C o The principal distinguishing characteristics of the vegetation. Inland from this region the plains are o of these characteristics, a higher percentage of the are the principal crops. Urban and industrial land u 3 2 . T e x a s B l a c k l a n The Texas Blackland Prairies form a disjunct predominantly prairie potential natural vegetation and marl parent materials. Unlike tallgrass prairie Mollisols. Dominant grasses included little blueste of cropland than adjacent regions; pasture and fora industrial uses. Typical game species include mou P ar th of N Barrier islands, peninsulas, bays, lagoons, marshes, estuaries, and flat 34. The region has been greatly modified. About 35 percent of the stat of its industrial base, commerce, and jobs are located within 100 miles half of the United States’ chemical and petroleum production is locate U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Less than one percent of the original vegetation remains in the Texas B several small parcels across the region. A transitional prairie type at th shown here. These remnant prairies contain imperiled plant communit many bird species and other fauna. Restoration activities in some of th prescribed burning, haying, and bison grazing. Photo: Lee Stone, City of The Llano Uplift (30b) contains rocks that are distinctly different from Edwards Plateau. Exposed pink crystalline granite, such as Enchanted domelike hills that often contain unique plant communities. Much of the surface water in Ecoregion 25 in the Texas Panhandle occ that form in small depressions. Many of these shallow recharge wetlan modified or converted to cropland or feedlot uses. Photo: Loren M. Smit S po G gr tr to B T bu ty E ar m su lo sp w er gr th gr Literature Cited: Bailey, R.G., Avers, P.E., King, T., and McNab, W.H., eds., 1994, Ecoregions and subregions of the United States (map) (supplementary table of map unit descriptions compiled and edited by McNab, W.H., and Bailey, R.G.): Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, scale 1:7,500,000. Bryce, S.A., Omernik, J.M., and Larsen, D.P., 1999, Ecoregions - a geographic framework to guide risk characterization and ecosystem management: Environmental Practice, v. 1, no. 3, p. 141-155. Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, Ecological regions of North America - toward a common perspective: Montreal, Quebec, Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 71 p. Gallant, A.L., Whittier, T.R., Larsen, D.P., Omernik, J.M., and Hughes, R.M., 1989, Regionalization as a tool for managing environmental resources: Corvallis, Oregon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA/600/3- 89/060, 152 p. McMahon, G., Gregonis, S.M., Waltman, S.W., Omernik, J.M., Thorson, T.D., Freeouf, J.A., Rorick, A.H., and Keys, J.E., 2001, Developing a spatial framework of common ecological regions for the conterminous United States: Environmental Management, v. 28, no. 3, p. 293-316. Omernik, J.M., 1987, Ecoregions of the conterminous United States (map supplement): Annals of the Association of American Geographers, v. 77, no. 1, p. 118-125, scale 1:7,500,000. Omernik, J.M., 1995, Ecoregions - a spatial framework for environmental management, in Davis, W.S., and Simon, T.P., eds., Biological assessment and criteria-tools for water resource planning and decision making: Boca Raton, Florida, Lewis Publishers, p. 49-62. Omernik, J.M., Chapman, S.S., Lillie, R.A., and Dumke, R.T., 2000, Ecoregions of Wisconsin: Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, v. 88, no. 2000, p. 77-103. U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service, 1981, Land resource regions and major land resource areas of the United States: Agriculture Handbook 296, 156 p. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2003, Level III ecoregions of the continental United States (revision of Omernik, 1987): Corvallis, Oregon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Map M-1, various scales. Wiken, E., 1986, Terrestrial ecozones of Canada: Ottawa, Environment Canada, Ecological Land Classification Series no. 19, 26 p. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance (Bryce and others, 1999). These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas (Omernik and others, 2000). The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions are hierarchical and can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity (Wiken 1986; Omernik 1987, 1995). These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 52 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group 1997). At level III, the continental United States contains 104 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 84 ecoregions (United States Environmental Protection Agency [USEPA] 2003). Level IV, depicted here for the State of Texas, is a further refinement of level III ecoregions. Explanations of the methods used to define the USEPA’s ecoregions are given in Omernik (1995), Omernik and others (2000), and Gallant and others (1989). Ecological and biological diversity of Texas is enormous. The state contains barrier islands and coastal lowlands, large river floodplain forests, rolling plains and plateaus, forested hills, deserts, and a variety of aquatic habitats. There are 12 level III ecoregions and 56 level IV ecoregions in Texas and most continue into ecologically similar parts of adjacent states in the U.S. or Mexico. The level III and IV ecoregions on this poster were compiled at a scale of 1:250,000 and depict revisions and subdivisions of earlier level III ecoregions that were originally compiled at a smaller scale (USEPA 2003; Omernik 1987). This poster is part of a collaborative project primarily between USEPA Region VI, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (Corvallis, Oregon), Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), and the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Collaboration and consultation also occurred with the United States Department of the Interior-Geological Survey (USGS)-Earth Resources Observation Systems Data Center, and with other State of Texas agencies and universities. The project is associated with an interagency effort to develop a common framework of ecological regions (McMahon and others, 2001). Reaching that objective requires recognition of the differences in the conceptual approaches and mapping methodologies applied to develop the most common ecoregion-type frameworks, including those developed by the United States Forest Service (Bailey and others, 1994), the USEPA (Omernik 1987, 1995), and the NRCS (U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service, 1981). As each of these frameworks is further refined, their differences are becoming less discernible. Regional collaborative projects such as this one in Texas, where some agreement has been reached among multiple resource management agencies, are a step toward attaining consensus and consistency in ecoregion frameworks for the entire nation. Ecoregions of Texas Memorial Park sits within the West Gulf Coastal Plain which spans the entire US coast from Texas to Louisiana. This ecosystem has a unique palette of plants and characteristics. The Nature Conservancy counts it as one of earth’s most diverse and valuable ecosystems with more than 30 species of plants per square meter. ECOREGION: TEXAS’ WESTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN
  • 31. A RESTORED RIPARIAN CORRIDORS Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
  • 32. The cool, dense shade from the diverse mix of trees cre- ate the unique character of the bottomland forests of the bayou. A limited mix of invasive species dominate the understory, obscuring views, native plants, and the rich biological diversity of a healthy forest. The soil is mark- edly sandier, and coupled with the controlled water flow from Barker ’s and Addicks reservoirs, the river banks are steep, unstable, and highly erosive. A lack of grasses and shrubs at the water’s edge is evident. A dense mature mixed bottomland hardwood forest will continue to dominate the majority of the riparian corridor (Populus deltoides, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Platanus oc- cidentalis, Quercus phellos, Q. pagoda, Q. texana, Fraxi- nus caroliniana, Diospyros virginiana. Nyssa sylvatica with some Pinus taeda). Invasives will be removed, allowing for a more transparent healthier and more diverse under- story. The forest floor on shallower slopes will be loosely populated with ferns (Lorinseria areolata, and Onoclea sensibilis), limited shade-tolerant and water-loving grass- es and other perennials (Elymus Canadensis, Dichanthe- lium dichotomum var. ensifolium, and Chasmanthium sessiliflorum, Desmanthus illinoensis, Hymenocallis liri- osme, Iris virginica, Eupatorium serotinum, Mitchella re- pens L., Lobelia cardinalis, and Erigeron philadelphicus) will be re-established (Tripsacum dactyloides, Dichan- thelium dichotomum var. ensifolium, and Chasmanthium sessiliflorum), perennials (Hymenocallis liriosme, Iris virg- inica, Eupatorium serotinum, Mitchella repens L., Lobelia puberula, and Erigeron philadelphicus) and select shrubs (Indigo miniata, Sambucus canadensis, Bidens albaaris- tosa, and Agarista populifolia). On the banks approaching and adjacent to the water’s edge , obligate and facultative wetland grasses (Equise- tum, Elocharis montana, Juncus rowmerianus, Tripsacum dactyloides, Tridens strictus, Paspalum floridanum, and Panicum hemitomon) will become more dense, provid- ing critical cover, nesting habitat, and forage for wildlife. Shrubs and understory canopy trees will serve a similar purpose and help stabilize slopes (Betula nigra, Celtis laevigata, Cyrilla racemiflora, and Crataegus opaca). This area will not have a regular understory manage- ment regime, but it will require a regular regime of inva- sive species control. Dead wood will be left undisturbed, standing or fallen, for wildlife habitat, except where it en- croaches on trails and program areas, proving a risk to people. Existing Condition Design Vision RIPARIAN CORRIDORS: EXISTING VS. RESTORED
  • 33. RIPARIAN CORRIDORS RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush Scirpus pungens / American Bullrush Eleocharis montana / Knotty Spike-Rush Salix nigra / Black Willow Quercus phellos / Willow Oak Agarista populifolia / Wax Mertle Celtis laevigata / Sugarberry or Sugar Hickory Lorinseria areolata / Chain Fern Persea borbonia / Red Bay Eupatorium serotinum / Boneset Scirpus validus / Soft-stem Bullrush Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens Sambucus canadensis / Elderberry Quercus pagoda / Cherrybark Oak Bidens alba / Romerillo Carya texana / Black hickory Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern Betula nigra / River Birch Callicarpa americana / Beautyberry Acer negundo / Box Elder Cyrilla racemiflora / Swamp Titi Platanus occidentalis / American Sycamore Sambucus canadensis / Elderberry Fraxinus pennsylvanica / Green Ash Dryopteris marginalis / Common Wood Fern Quercus texana / Texas Red Oak Bidens alba / Romerillo 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft. 64 ft.
  • 34. C RESTORED BARRANCOS & RIPARIAN EDGES Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
  • 35. The upper reaches of the Bayou riparian corridor as well as the ravines that stretch into the park, “barrancos” are characterized by their steep slopes, sandy soil, and di- verse well-drained mixed hardwood forest. Many bike and pedestrian trails currently crisscross along and through these slopes, exacerbating an already unstable soil condition. The understory is dominated by invasive species. At this edge where the well-drained slope nears the ter- race flats and the dense forest from the bayou begins to open up, trees transition to hardwood and pine species that can withstand periods of drought and inundation. Overstory canopy trees (Acer negundo, Liquidamber styraciflua, Magnolia grandiflora, Pinus tTaeda and echi- nata, Ulmus alata and nigra, and Quercus michauxiii) and understory trees (Asimina triloba, Cornus drummon- diisp., Diospyros virginianaCarpinus caroliniana, Cratae- gus drummondii and marshallii) will become dominant features of this landscape as understory invasives are cleared out to expose their unique character and quality of light. On average, the ground plane will consist of 25% shrubs and 25% herbaceous plants. This loose and scattered shade-tolerant shrub layer will provide wildlife habitat and forage and to stabilize these sandy and highly ero- sive slopes (Agarista populifolia, Callicarpa aAmericana, Phlox divaricata,Rubus trivialis). The establishment of a native shrub palette will be important for when invasives are removed to minimize disturbance. With more pine straw on the forest floor and dappled sunlight, only certain grasses and other perennials (Chasmanthium latifolium and sessiliflorum, Elymus vir- ginicus, Paspalum plicatum, and Eupatorium perfoliatum- serotinum Mitchella repens L., and Dryopteris marginalis), and ferns (Dryopteris marginalis, Lorinseria areolata, and Onoclea sensibilis) will thrive here. Design Vision BARRANCOS & RIPARIAN EDGES: EXISTING VS. RESTORED Existing Condition
  • 36. BARRANCO RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION Ulmus alata / Winged Elm Quercus michauxii / Swamp Chestnut Oak Asimina triloba / Pawpaw Carpinus caroliniana / American hornbeam Salix nigra / Black Willow Acer negundo / Box Elder Liquidamber styraciflua / Sweetgum Crataegus mollis / Downy Hawthorne Quercus nigra / Water oak Crataegus marshallii / Parsley Hawthorne Gleditsia triacanthos / Honey Locust Fraxinus caroliniana / Carolina Buckthorn Betula nigra / River Birch Nyssa sylvatica / Black Tupelo Platanus occidentalis / American Sycamore Celtis laevigata / Sugarberry or Sugar Hickory Cyrilla racemiflora / Swamp Titi Populus deltoides / Cottonwood Crataegus opaca/ Mayhaw Persea borbonia / Red Bay Ulmus crassifolia / Cedar Elm Dryopteris marginalis/ Common Wood Fern Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush Panicum anceps / Beaked Panicum Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane Paspalum plicatulum / Brownseed Paspalum Lorinseria areolata / Chain Fern Chasmanthium latifolium / Inland Sea Oats Paspalum floridanum / Florida Paspalum Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft. 64 ft. 80 ft.
  • 37. F RESTORED PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
  • 38. The steep sandy slopes of the bayou and barrancos give way quickly to the flat broad terrace of Memorial Park. Other disparate patches of pine-hardwood forest have become established across the site over the past 100 years. The vegetative composition of this forest is currently a jumbled mix of incredibly dense invasive species in the understory and pine and hardwood trees that are hard to spot. Many of the trees were badly damaged during the most recent drought and hurricane. Some have been removed and others remain standing. These woods will range in density from 150 trees per acre closest to the riparian corridor to more open at 100 trees per acre on the edges that border savannah. The dominance of pine or hardwood trees will depend on the type of soil. Those that are pine-dominant, (Pinus taeda and to be established Pinus echinata) will be scattered with stands/motts of dry-mesic hardwoods (Carya spp.; Quercus alba, falcata, virginiana, prinus and stellata; Morus rubra; Celtis occidentalis; Sassafrass albidium; Liquidambar styraciflua, Catalpa bignonoides and Tilia Caroliniana). On average, the ground plane will consist of 25% shrubs and 25% herbaceous plants. Shrubs will tend to be loose in structure and planted in odd groupings of 3-5 (Agarista populifolia, Callicarpa Americana, Rubus trivialis). Peren- nials will be planted similarly and en masse (Amsonia illustris, Cooperia drummondii, Desmanthus illinoensis, Conoclinium coelestinumDryopteris marginalis, and Mitchella repens L.). Grasses will be diverse in species and follow a similar form and distribution as perennials (Tripsacum dactyloides, Elymus virginicus L., Chasman- thium sessiliflorum, Muhlenbergia capillaris, Schizachy- rium scoparium, Panicum virgatum) as will ferns (Pteridi- um aquilinum (L.) Kuhn var. pseudocaudatum, Dryopteris marginalis). Clearing of brush on a bi- or triennial basis will be neces- sary in this landscape to keep the forest floor open and to keep hardwoods from becoming too dense. A rigorous invasive species management regime will be necessary. Design Vision PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST: EXISTING VS. RESTORED Existing Condition
  • 39. PINE-HARDWOOD FOREST RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf PineLeucothoe populifolia / Florida Leucothoe Eupatorium serotinum / Boneset Crataegus texana / Texas Hawthorn Cooperia drummondii / Rain LillyQuercus falcata / Southern Red Oak Quercus prinus / Chestnut Oak Muhlenbergia capillaris / Gulf MuhleyQuercus alba / White oak Quercus stellata / Post Oak Symphoricarpos orbiculatus / Coral Berry Sassafras albidum / Sassafras Quercus stellata / Post OakCarya illinoensis / Pecan Itea virginica / Sweetspire Onoclea sensibilis / Sensitive Fern Schizachyrium scoparium / Little BluestemRubus trivialis / Dewberry Celtis occidentalis / Hackberry Quercus virginiana / Southern Live OakMorus rubra / Red Mulberry Pinus taeda / Loblolly PineAgarista populifolia / Florida Hobblebush Mitchella repens L. / Partridgeberry Catalpa bignonoides / Southern Catalpa Amsonia illustris / Showy Blue StarQuercus alba / White Oak Andropogon ternarius Michx. / SplitbeardQuercus falcata / Southern Red Oak Callicarpa americana / Beautyberry Tilia caroliniana / Carolina Basswood Quercus prinus / Chestnut OakCarya ovata / Shagbark Hickory 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft.
  • 40. D RESTORED PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
  • 41. Over the past 60 years, most of the flat terrace of Me- morial Park has become densely forested. Before this time, Camp Logan and the Reinermans, coastal prairie with pine-hardwood savannahs would have dominated this landscape. The recent drought and hurricane were destructive natural forces here; however, their clearing effect has left a density of trees that resembles earlier prairie-savannah typologies. While some patches have been cleared of, many areas with standing dead wood, dead brush, and invasives remain that require thinning, clearing, and scrubbing. The pine-hardwood savannah of Memorial Park will be- come one of its most defining landscape typologies. It will be the intersection of the rich native prairie with clus- ters of pine trees and hardwood motts. The tree palette will typically mirror the pine-hardwood forest with the oc- casional addition of Carya illinoinesis (the State tree of Texas) and Juglans nigra. Long views through the grass- lands will punctuate otherwise loosely wooded areas. On average, there will be about 50 trees per acre; although this is misleading as the trees will be in clusters, leav- ing significant open areas. Shrubs will comprise 20% of the ground plane while herbaceous plants will comprise 70%. The grasses and forbs in this complex will resemble those in the prairie in their diversity, type, and distribu- tion. Grasses (Sorgastrum nutans, Schizachyrium sco- parium, Panicum virgatum, Muhlenbergia capillaris, Ely- mus virginicus L., Briza minor, Agrostis hyemalis) and perennials (Erigeron philadelphicus, Mimosa strigillosa, Chanaecrista fasciculata, Cooperia drummondii, Des- manthus illinoensis, Digitaria cognataGaillardia pulchella, Asclepias logiflora and verticillata, Mimosa nuttallii, Phlox drummondii, Rudbeckia hirta, Indigo miniata, and Salvia azurea) will be tolerant of periods of both drought and in- undation. They will require bi-annual mowing (or burning if possible) as well as regular invasive species control. These areas are not intended to be occupied like lawns. While occasional foot traffic is anticipated, paths winding through them with small gathering areas are how they will be experienced. Design Vision PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH: EXISTING VS. RESTORED Existing Condition
  • 42. PINE-HARDWOOD SAVANNAH RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION Desmanthus illinoensis / Illinois Bundleflower Leptochloa dubia / Green sprangletop Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass Quercus prinus / Chestnut Oak Tilia caroliniana / Carolina Basswood Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass Pinus taeda / Loblolly Pine Crataegus texana / Texas Hawthorn Mimosa nuttallii / Nuttall’s Sensitive-Briar Phlox drummondii / Drummond’s Phlox Salvia azurea / Blue Sage Erigeron philadelphicus / Daisy fleabane Andropogon ternarius Michx. / Splitbeard Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem Asclepias verticillata / Wholred Milkweed Chasmanthium sessiliflorum / Longleaf Uniola Gaillardia pulchella / Indian Blanket Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass Agrostis hyemalis / Spring Bentgrass Quercus stellata / Post Oak Elymus virginicus L. / Virginia Wildrye Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf Pine Mimosa strigillosa / Powderpuff Baccharis halimifolia / Eastern False Willow Rudbeckia hirta / Black-eyed SusanSorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft.
  • 43. D RESTORED NATIVE PRAIRIE Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key
  • 44. There are some areas of the park maintained as native prairie adjacent to Memorial Drive and the railroad. The intent is for these to remain and be maintained in perpe- tuity. There is a good existing mix of grasses and peren- nials. In other areas where prairie will exist but currently does not, the landscape is overrun by invasive shrubs; occuld- ing the presence of native grasses or has recently been cleared and scrubbed after the recent loss of trees. The prairie landscape of the West Gulf Coastal Plain is the dominant typology in this ecosystem. The area that will be dedicated in the park to return to this landscape type is predominantly around the heart of the park at the land bridge. It will connect to H.A.N.C.’s prairie and spread southward toward the bayou and in limited part north along the railroad. There will be only 5-10 trees per acre, such as Juglans nigra, Quercus virginiana and Q. falcata, that will be the same dry-mesic species of both the savannah and pine- hardwood forest. Oaks will be the dominant species, and the lack of competition for sunlight will allow them to grow to full size and form, making them sculptural treasures of the park. Their maintenance will be critical for this reason. Shrubs and flowering perenials (Indigo miniata, Coreop- sis lanceolata, Desmanthius illinoensis, and Dalea pur- pea) primarily along trails, roadsides,and the railroad) will take up 20% of the ground plane and will provide excellent habitat for butterflies for the public to view while 80% of the ground plane will be grasses and other forbs. The species makeup and maintenance regime for this complex will be similar to those in the savannah grass- land (specifically Andropogon geradii, Panicum virgatum, Schizachrium scoparium, and Sorgastrum nutans. Within the Native Praire, Bouteloua curtipendula will be estab- lished, as it is the State Grass of Texas). Standing and fallen dead wood, when not a threat to people, will be left for wildlife habitat. People will experi- ence this landscape on foot, on bike, and car with long views through grasses and to distant savannahs. Design Vision NATIVE PRAIRIE: EXISTING VS. RESTORED Existing Condition
  • 45. NATIVE PRAIRIE RESTORED ECOLOGY SECTION Agrostis hyemalis / Spring Bentgrass Baccharis halimifolia / Eastern False Willow Elymus virginicus L. / Virginia Wildrye Asclepias verticillata / Wholred Milkweed Rudbeckia hirta / Black-eyed Susan Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass Pinus echinata / Short-Leaf Pine Quercus virginiana / Southern Live Oak Panicum virgatum ‘Cloud Nine’ / Cloud Nine Switchgrass Briza minor / Little Quaking Grass Leptochloa dubia / Green sprangletop Asclepias longifolia / Florida Milkweed Salvia azurea / Blue Sage Andropogon ternarius / Splitbeard Bluestem Pinus taeda / Loblolly Pine Quercus alba / White oak Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem Panicum virgatum / Switchgrass Sorgastrum nutans / Yellow Indiangrass Gaillardia pulchella / Indian Blanket Amsonia illustris / Showy Blue Star Schizachyrium scoparium / Little Bluestem Quercus falcata / Southern Red Oak Andropogon / Broomsedge 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft.
  • 46. RESTORED WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH Typical Section Locations in Memorial Park & Section Key D
  • 47. There are a number of seasonally and perennially wet areas within the park. Their state and official designation remain unknown during the master plan process. Further exploration of these areas for any design work will be necessary. Wet prairie and savannahs, like official wetlands, are criti- cal to wintering and migrating wildlife as places to nest, rest, and forage as well as general ecosystem function. These areas flood seasonally. They will be important for naturally-occurring stormwater detention. They may be important areas for educating the public about the func- tion and importance of wetlands and wet areas and their place in Texas ecology. Boardwalks and interpretive ar- eas may intersect with these landscape types. They have different soil and water properties, and be- cause of this, their vegetation varies from more dry ar- eas. They contain more facultative and facultative wet- land forbs and grasses (Panicum anceps, Paspalum plicatulum, Paspalum floridanum, Elocharis montana, Scirpus pungens, Scirpus validus, eg.) and can harbor trees and shrubs that don’t mind wet feet (Taxodium dis- tichum, Platanus occidentalis, Nyssa aquatic and sylvat- ica, Quercus texana, eg.) The structural characteristics of both the wet savannah and wet prairie will resemble their dry counterparts in number of plants per acre. Design Vision WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH: EXISTING VS. RESTORED Existing Condition
  • 48. WET PRAIRIE & SAVANNAH RESTORED ECOLOGY Lythrum alatum / Lance-Leaf Loosestrife Lobelia puberula / Downy Lobelia Tridens strictus / Long-Spike Tridens Nyssa aquatica / Water Tupelo Dichanthelium dichotomum / Delicate Panicum Betula nigra / River Birch Paspalum floridanum / Florida PaspalumTripsacum dactyloides / Eastern Gama Grass Nyssa sylvatica / Black Tupelo Panicum hemitomon / Maidencane Juncus rowmerianus / Black Needlerush Scirpus pungens / American Bullrush Crataegus opaca / Mayhaw Fraxinus caroliniana / Carolina Buckthorn Rhexia mairiana L. / Meadowbeauty Sabal minor / Dwarf Palmetto 16 ft. 32 ft. 48 ft. Paspalum plicatulum / Brownseed Paspalum Taxodium distichum / Bald Cypress Panicum anceps / Beaked Panicum Quercus texana / Texas Red Oak Persea borbonia / Red Bay Eleocharis montana / Knotty Spike-Rush Scirpus validus / Soft-stem Bullrush
  • 49. Catalpa bignonoides | Southern Catalpa F, S Carya illinoensis | Pecan F, S, P Acer negundo | Box Elder R, B Quercus falcata | Southern Red Oak F, S, P Quercus virginiana | Southern Live Oak F, S, P Sassafras albidum | Sassafras F, S, P Carya ovata | Shagbark Hickory F, S, P Celtis occidentalis | Hackberry F, S, P Morus rubra | Red Mulberry F, S, P Quercus alba | White oak F, S, P Quercus prinus | Chestnut Oak F, S, P Quercus stellata | Post Oak F, S, P Tilia caroliniana | Carolina Basswood F, S Obligate Upland (UPL) Facultative Upland (FACU) Facultative (FAC) Diospyros virginiana | Common Persimmon F, R Gleditsia triacanthos | Honey Locust R Liquidamber styraciflua | Sweetgum R Magnolia grandiflora | Southern Magnolia F, R PLANT PALETTE EXAMPLE (TREES)
  • 51. 338 spaces 20 spaces 90 spaces 292 spaces 216 spaces 20 spaces 22 spaces 34 spaces 28 spaces 120 spaces 228 spaces 50 spaces 48 spaces 76 spaces 75 spaces 484 spaces 177 spaces 54 spaces 90 spaces 11 car spaces 5 bus spaces 56 spaces 83 spaces 106 spaces 185 spaces PROPOSED PARKING Dispersed parking lots provide improved access to park activities. Parking along Memorial Loop Road is removed, allowing for two way traffic and a more park-like feeling. Discrete parking areas now provide access to all parts of the site. The proposed parking design provides greater than 30% increase in parking capacity. Existing Proposed Legend
  • 52. Harris County Metropolitan Transit Authority is currently reconfiguring bus routes to serve as a grid-based system. Their goal is to create easier point-to-point access between all parts of the city. Many lines will have increased frequencies, and weekend service will be as frequent as weekday service. One source: Houston Metro Draft Reimagined Transit Network Map Northwest Transit Hub Detail 0.9 mi walk from Northwest Transit Hub to Memorial Park; source: Google Maps of the cities largest hubs--the Northwest Transit Center--will be less than a mile north of the NW entrance at Memorial Drive. The design team is conducting a traffic study that is in progress. HOUSTON TRANSIT SYSTEM REIMAGINING NW Transit Center Memorial Park
  • 53. EXISTING TRANSIT Existing 60 minute bus route Existing 30 minute bus route Existing 15 minute bus route Bus stops Legend
  • 54. 15-minute interval bus routes rather than 30-minute intervals running through and adjacent to the park as well as better stops would provide better access to the park for all Houstonians. PROPOSED TRANSIT CONNECTIONS Existing 60 minute bus route Existing 30 minute bus route Existing 15 minute bus route Proposed bus stop Increased frequency route Existing Bus stops Legend Pedestrian connections
  • 55. The transit vision for the park is to create hubs where parking, bus stops, and B-Cycle bike share stations are clustered to allow easy transitions from public transit to on-site bicycle use. Proposed 15 min bus route Existing 60 min bus route Existing 30 min bus route Existing 15 min bus route Bus hub Bike parking Existing Bus stops Legend B-Cycle station Pedestrian connections PROPOSED TRANSIT/BIKE CONNECTIONS
  • 56. SHEET NUMBER SHEET TITLE DESIGNED BY NO. REVIEWED BY DRAWN BY PROJECT NUMBER DATE DATE REVISION JLP JLP DPC M03-14037-00 PROJECT NAME MEMORIAL PARK P:M03201414072-01MemorialParkTrafficStudyTrafficCadTrafficM03-14072-01-FIGURES.dwgMar03,2015-9:50am W A L TE R P . M O O RE A N D A S S O CI A TES , IN C . 1 3 0 1 M c K I N N E Y , S U ITE 1100 H O U S T O N , TE X A S 77010 P H ON E : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 .7300 F AX : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0.7396 Copyright C WALTER P. MOORE AND ASSOCIATES, INC.2015 FEBRUARY 2015 N.T.S. FIGURE 2 2012 HISTORICAL VOLUMES (FROM GOOGLE EARTH) 10,000 VEHICLES PER DAY 45,000 VEHICLES PER DAY 2,000 VEHICLES PER DAY 1,000 VEHICLES PER DAY 5,000 VEHICLES PER DAY 55,000 VEHICLES PER DAY
  • 57. Project Name: Sheet No. Sheet Title: WPMA P.N.: Date: Designed by: Drawn by: P:M03201414072-01MemorialParkTrafficStudyTrafficCadTrafficM03-14072-01-FIGURES.dwgMar03,2015-9:50am W A L T E R P . M O O R E A ND A S S OC IA TE S , I NC . 1 3 0 1 M c K I N N E Y , S UITE 1100 H O U S T O N , T E XA S 77010 P H O NE : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 . 7 300 F AX : 7 1 3 . 6 3 0 . 7396 Copyright C WALTER P. MOORE AND ASSOCIATES, INC.2015 Drawn by: MEMORIAL PARK MARCH 2015 BAB DPC N.T.S. LEGEND: - UNDER CAPACITY (LOS A - LOS C) - AT CAPACITY (LOS D - LOS E) - OVER CAPACITY (LOS F OVER) X X X -ADJUSTEDEXISTING -BACKGROUND -PROPOSED AA A AM AA A PM CC C AM AA A PM XX X LEVEL OF SERVICE COMPARISON
  • 59. MEMORIAL PARK MASTERPLAN : INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP : 3-27-2014 SITE ELEVATION ELEVATION TABLE
  • 60. ECOLOGICAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: OVERALL PLAN Objective: To cleanse stormwater pavement runoff to remove most pollutants prior to discharge into harvesting ponds or the Bayou.   Ecological Stormwater Goals: 1. Cleanse the first inch of stormwater runoff from all pavement surfaces 2. Manage stormwater using Low Impact Development (LID) methods to the extent possible 3. Design irrigation systems to use the cleansed, harvested water 4. Enhance the ecological restoration of the park using the stormwater system Collection Ponds Existing Streams Treatment Pond Conveyance Swales Legend Detention Areas
  • 61. ECOLOGICAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: BALLFIELDS Objective: To cleanse stormwater pavement runoff to remove most pollutants prior to discharge into harvesting ponds or Bayou.   Ecological Stormwater Goals: 1. Install parking lot bio-swales to intercept surface sheet flows 2. Install parking lot bio-swales to intercept surface sheet flows 3. Provide water harvesting pond for irrigation source in this area 4. Provide detention storage as required to reduce outlet flow rate to less than existing conditions Collection Ponds Existing Streams Conveyance Swales Legend
  • 62. MEMORIAL PARK MASTERPLAN : INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP : 3-27-2014 STORMWATER EXISTING
  • 63. EXISTING WATER USE MAJOR IRRIGATION USE: Golf Course: 59 million gal/yr (= 181 acres covered by 1 foot of water) Polo Field: 10 million gal/yr (= 30 acres covered by 1 foot of water) Sports Field: 16 million gal/yr (= 48 acres covered by 1 foot of water) Lesser water use areas Existing Streams Largest water use Legend
  • 64. STORMWATER REUSE STRATEGY Objective: Reduce park potable water irrigation use with rain water collected on site (and north of the park)   Watershed Phases: Water collection from the following watersheds will offset irrigation demand as modeled: GC1 = 48% golf course demand GC1+GC2 = 54% golf course demand GC1+GC2+GC3 = 100% golf course demand Ballfields = 50% offset Eastern Glades = 75% offset Collection Ponds Existing Streams Treatment Pond Legend Golf Course Watersheds Eastern Glades Watershed Ballfields Watershed
  • 65. PROPOSED PLAN Memorial Park Tomorrow, a Place for all Houstonians 5
  • 66. 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Running Center and Timing Track Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Land Bridge Bayou Wilds MASTER PLAN
  • 67. 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Running Center and Timing Track Land Bridge 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Running Center and Timing Track Land Bridge WOODWAY WEST MEMORIAL ARNOT EAST MEMORIAL WASHINGTON / WESTCOTT MAIN ENTRANCES
  • 68. Artist's Rendering at I-610 and the Old Archery Range WOODWAY ENTRANCE
  • 69. Section looking East toward I-610 from the Old Archery Range Detail WOODWAY ENTRANCE
  • 70. Detail Section looking East into the park WEST MEMORIAL DRIVE AT I-610
  • 71. ARTIST'S RENDERING: WEST ENTRANCE AT WOODWAY DR. Section looking West into the park ARNOT ENTRANCE
  • 72. Artist's Rendering toward Memorial Drive between Crestwood and Memorial Loop Rd. EAST MEMORIAL DRIVE ENTRANCE
  • 73. Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds LAND BRIDGE & RUNNING CENTER LAND BRIDGE RUNNING CENTER & TIMING TRACK 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 74. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - LAND BRIDGE & RUNNING CENTER
  • 75. (Left) Precedent: wildlife bridge, Bukit, Timah, Singapore (Top) Precedent: path in a prairie complex (Bottom) Precedent: Nike headquarters woodland track, Beaverton , OR PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 78. 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Running Center and Timing Track Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Trailhead Land Bridge BAYOU WILDS BAYOU WILDS
  • 79. PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILS 1” = 500’ 250’0’ 500’ 1000’
  • 80. PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILS 1” = 500’ 250’0’ 500’ 1000’ 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ 01 02 03 04 04 03 02 01 Buffalo Bayou Southern Arc Path (natural surface) Trail Heads Parking 02 05 06 05 Mountain Bike Trails (natural surface) Hiking Trails (natural surface) 06
  • 81. (Left) Boardwalk Precedent (Top) Precedent: mountain biking trails (Bottom) Precedent: Hardberger Park, San Antonio, TX PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 82. ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS' SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL
  • 83. ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS HIKING TRAIL
  • 84. ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS BIKING TRAIL
  • 85. PARKING LOT CROSSING CONNECTIONONLYTHROUGHSLT CONNECTION ON NORTH SIDE OF ROAD ONLY THROUGH SLT Multi Use Trail Bridle Trails Arboretum Trails Outer Loop Tex-DOT Trail Cycle Track (picnic loop) Seymour Lieberman Trail 1000’0’ 2000’ EXISTING TRAIL NETWORK
  • 86. Proposed Trail Network: 1000’0’ 2000’ PROPOSED TRAIL NETWORK Seymour Lieberman Trail Running Track Multi-Use Trails Cycle Track Natural Surface Hiking Trails Natural Surface Mountain Bike Trails Equestrian Trails Equestrian and Pedestrian Trails Boardwalks Bayou Access Legend Bayou Boat Route
  • 87. EXISTING PROGRAM FOOTPRINT IN BAYOU WILDS MaiMaiMaintententenannannanna cecece CenCenCenterterter PicPicPicnicnicnic ArArAreaeaeae RunRunRunninninning Cg Cg Cg entententererer BalBalBall Fl Fl Fielielieldsdsds TurTurTurf Gf Gf Grasrasassss ParParkinkinggg &&& RoaRoaRoaddd SoSoSoS utututhhh SiSiSidedede 19191919,9,9,9,942424242 8,8,886969699 RuRuRuRunnnnnnnnininingggg CeCeCentntntnterererer 77779,9,9,,090909777 sfsfsfsf MaMaMaininintetetenananancncnceee AArAreaeaeaa 333388888,3,333252525 ssssffff PiPiPiP cncncnicicic AAAArererereaaaa 2222,3,3232333,1,111000000 ssssffff BaBaBallllll FFFFieieieldldlddss 55545454545,3,3,338383838 sssfff TuTuTT rfrf GGGGrarar sssssss 414141419,9,9,373737888 sfsfsf PaPaPaP rkrkrkkini gggg +++ RoRoRoRoadadad 222383838,7,75454 ssff
  • 88. RunRunninning Cg Cententerer MaiMaintentenannancece AreAreaa NewNew PaParkirk ngngg BayBayyouou WilWilWildsdsds TraTraTrailhilhi eadeadea AreAreaa 11/4 MiMilele TraT ckk PROPOSED PROGRAM FOOTPRINT IN BAYOU WILDS SouSouthth SidSidee 19199,94,94,942,82,869699 sf RunRunninninning Cg Cg ententerer 799,09,09,097 s7 s7 fff MaiMaintentenannanancecece AreAreeaaa 38388388,32,32,325 s5 sff Newew PaPaP rkirkinngn 20520205,42228 s8 s8 sff Bayayouou WilWildsds TraTraTrailhilhheaeae 3737376,11828282 sfsf 1/41/41/4 MiMilelele TraTrackckk 5656,89,89898 s8 sff
  • 89. 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Running Center and Timing Track Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Land Bridge BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
  • 90. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD 12 12 11 11 10 10 09 09 08 08 07 07 06 06 05 05 05 04 04 04 03 03 02 02 01 01 Southern Arc Trail Observation Tower Climbing Walls Nature Playground Childrens' Biking Loop (hard surface) Childrens' Biking Loop (natural surface) Trail Heads Pump Track Picnic Areas Pavilion Parking Land Bridge
  • 91. (Left) Ateliereen Tower, Dalfsen Holland (Top) Precedent: Dinton Pastures Nature Playground, Wokingham UK (Bottom) Precedent: Cow Hollow nature playground, San Francisco CA PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 92. ARTIST'S RENDERING: BAYOU WILDS TRAILHEAD
  • 93. ARTIST'S RENDERING: LOOKOUT TOWER OVER SAVANNAH
  • 95. Running Center and Timing Track Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Family Recreation Area Land Bridge Running Center and Timing Track Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Family Recreation Area Land Bridge BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 96. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - BAYOU BREAKS TRAILS Southern Arc Trail Observation Tower Buffalo Bayou Mountain bike trails (natural surface) 01 01 02 02 03 03 04 04 05 06 Hiking Trails (natural surface)05 Bayou boardwalk overlook (wood)0605
  • 98. AERIAL ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIONS Waterfowl Flyways of North America Boreal Bird Flyways of North America Image: University of Texas Library, Boreal Songbird Institute Houston Houston
  • 99. BAYOU EDGE Sedge Wren & American Pipit White Ibis Red-Eared Slider Turtle WELL-DRAINED MIXED WOODLAND Red-Headed Woodpecker Summer Tanager MATURE MIXED BOTTOMLAND FOREST Pileated Woodpecker Five-Lined Skink Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat Target Wildlife & Ecological Zones: BAYOU to WOODLAND 1” = 400’ 200’0’ 400’ 800’ 1” = 40’ 20’0’ 40’ 80’12’ boardwalk 4’-0” natural surface hiking trail Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Prothonotary Warbler Wood Thrush Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Swallow-Tailed Kite Context Map & Trail Design Section A: Southern Arc Trail A Railroad I-610/Katy Memorial Dr. Crestwood Buffalo B ayou SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION
  • 100. PINE-DOMINATED MIXED WOODLAND Mississippi Kite Red-Tailed Hawk Northern Scarlet Snake Slender Glass Lizard Brown-Headed Nuthatch 1” = 400’ 200’0’ 400’ 800’ 1” = 40’ 20’0’ 40’ 80’12’ natural surface trail Context Map & Trail Design Section B: Southern Arc Trail Target Wildlife & Ecological Zones: PINE to MIXED WOODLAND WELL-DRAINED MIXED WOODLAND Red-Headed Woodpecker Summer Tanager Pileated Woodpecker Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Wood Thrush Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Swallow-Tailed Kite SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION Railroad I-610/Katy Memorial Dr. Crestwood Buffalo B ayou B
  • 101. 1” = 400’ 200’0’ 400’ 800’ 1” = 40’ 20’0’ 40’ 80’12’ boardwalk Context Map & Trail Design Section C: Southern Arc Trail Target Wildlife & Ecological Zones: BARRANCO WELL-DRAINED MIXED WOODLAND Red-Headed Woodpecker Summer Tanager Pileated Woodpecker Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Wood Thrush Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Swallow-Tailed Kite 4' natural surface trail BARRANCO Sedge Wren & American Pipit White Ibis Red-Eared Slider Turtle Five-Lined Skink Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat Prothonotary Warbler SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION Railroad I-610/Katy Memorial Dr. Crestwood Buffalo B ayou C
  • 102. 1” = 400’ 200’0’ 400’ 800’ 1” = 40’ 20’0’ 40’ 80’ Context Map & Trail Design Section D: Southern Arc Trail Target Wildlife & Ecological Zones: SAVANNAH TO WOODLAND WELL-DRAINED MIXED WOODLAND Red-Headed Woodpecker Summer Tanager Pileated Woodpecker Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Wood Thrush Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Swallow-Tailed Kite HARDWOOD SAVANNAH Eastern Towhee Savannah Sparrow Henslow’s Sparrow Mississippi Kite Red-Tailed Hawk 12’ natural surface trail 4’-0” natural surface hiking trail SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION Railroad I-610/Katy Memorial Dr. Crestwood Buffalo B ayou D
  • 103. 1” = 400’ 200’0’ 400’ 800’ 1” = 40’ 20’0’ 40’ 80’ Context Map & Trail Design Section F: Southern Arc Trail Target Wildlife & Ecological Zones: PRAIRIE TO WOODLAND WELL-DRAINED MIXED WOODLAND Red-Headed Woodpecker Summer Tanager Pileated Woodpecker Yellow-Billed Cuckoo Wood Thrush Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Swallow-Tailed Kite 12’ natural surface trail 4’-0” natural surface mountain bike trail (course) Indigo Bunting Le Conte’s SparrowField Sparrow Bachman’s Sparrow White-Tailed Hawk WOODLAND EDGE White Throated Sparrow Eastern Towhee PRAIRIE SOUTHERN ARC TRAIL SECTION Railroad I-610/Katy Memorial Dr. Crestwood Buffalo B ayou F
  • 104. 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Running Center and Timing Track Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Running Center and Timing Track Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds EASTERN GLADES EASTERN GLADES
  • 105. GENERAL PLAY AREA BASEBALL ECT. GARDEN BRIDAL PATHS & WALKS THROUGH NATIVE WOODS RIVER OAKS COUNTRY CLUB NURSERYPRIVATEPROPERTY PRESENT PROPERTY LINE APPROXIMATE LOCATION OF GOLF COURSE Cultivated Garden Presumed High-Use Areas Presumed Lower-Use Areas Legend PARK'S FOUNDING MASTER PLAN 1924 Proposed Entry & Gardens, golf course, and scenic roads by Hare & Hare Landscape Architects. Approved during the time of the park's founders. Although many parts of the plan were never built, the proposed organization of spaces remain relevant and culturally significant.
  • 106. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - EASTERN GLADES 07 07 06 06 06 06 05 05 05 05 05 04 04 03 03 02 02 01 01 Seymour Lieberman Trail Multi-use trail Parking Pond and Cypress Grove Pond Esplanade Eastern Garden Glade Eastern Glade
  • 107. (Left) Precedent: Villa Borghese, Rome, Italy (Above) Precedent: Forsyth Park, Savannah, GA (Above) Precedent: Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 111. Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Trails and Preserve Land Bridge Running Center & Timing Track TENNIS, FITNESS & NATATORIUM FITNESS / NATATORIUM TENNIS CENTER 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 112. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - TENNIS CENTER, FITNESS AND NATATORIUM 08 09 09 08 07 07 06 06 04 04 03 03 02 02 01 01 01 Golf Course Seymour Lieberman Trail Multi-use Trail Memorial Loop Drive Natatorium (Indoor Swimming) Fitness Center Tennis Courts Parking 10 Dense perimeter planting 10 10 11 Haskell Street 12 Arnot Street 12 11 13 13 Crestwood Drive
  • 113. PRECEDENTS: (TOP) SALINAS MUNI. AQUATIC CENTER (BOTTOM) BEIJING AQUATIC CENTRE
  • 114. Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Memorial Groves Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge SPORTS COMPLEX Sports Complex 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 115. Softball field Baseball field Pond Driving Range Croquet Court Golf Clubhouse Soccer Field Volleyball Court SLT Multi-use trail Parking 01 01 01 01 01 01 02 02 03 03 04 04 05 05 06 06 07 07 08 08 09 09 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 Picnic area12 12 11 11 Rugby Pitch13 13 03 03 03 1” = 300’ 150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - SPORTS COMPLEX
  • 116. ARTIST'S RENDERING - SPORTS COMPLEX
  • 117. Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Rugby Pitch OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge Sports Complex Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Rugby Pitch OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge Sports Complex 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ MEMORIAL GROVES MEMORIAL GROVES
  • 118. Memorial Groves Pine Planting Large Group Picnic Area Existing Motts Picnic Areas SLT Multi-use trail Memorial Loop Drive Parallel Parking and Accessway Golf Course 09 09 08 08 07 07 06 06 05 05 05 04 04 03 03 03 02 02 02 02 01 01 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - MEMORIAL GROVES PINE PLANTING
  • 119. (Left) Precedent: pine grove (Top) Hardberger Park picnic area, San Antonio, TX (Bottom) Existing Camp Logan latrine foundation, Memorial Park PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 122. HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPH OF CAMP LOGAN CIRCA 1918
  • 123. Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge Sports Complex Memorial Grove Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Rugby Pitch OAR Bayou Wilds CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 124. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ PLAN - CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS
  • 125. 1” = 250’ 125’0’ 250’ 500’ 04 05 05 04 03 03 03 02 02 01 01 Memorial Drive Multi-use trails Equestrian/Hiking Trails Cycle Track Parking PLAN - CYCLE TRACK AND TRAILS
  • 126. (Left) Precedent: Central Park Trail bridge, New York, NY (Top) Precedent: Equestrian trails (Bottom) Precedent: hard surface cycle track PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 128. Trailhead Hogg Bird Sanctuary Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Rugby Pitch Bayou Wilds Cycle Track and Trails Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge Sports Complex Memorial Grove OAR OLD ARCHERY RANGE (OAR) 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’
  • 129. 04 07 05 04 03 03 02 02 01 01 Orientation Point Pedestrian Bridge Bayou Access Parking Entrance off Woodway 04 04 07 06 I-610 Observation Tower 05 06 1” = 300’ 150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - OLD ARCHERY RANGE
  • 130. (Left) Precedent: Lookout Tower, Tiree, Scotland (Top) Precedent: Birkshire Boardwalk, Stockbridge, MA (Bottom) Precedent: Bronx River Alliance, Bronx, NY PRECEDENT PROJECTS
  • 131. PRECEDENT: YOUTH BOAT BUILDING PROGRAMS
  • 132. Trailhead Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Rugby Pitch Bayou Wilds HOGG BIRD SANCTUARY Cycle Track and Trails Running Center & Timing Track Land Bridge Sports Complex Memorial Grove OAR 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ HOGG BIRD SANCTUARY
  • 133. 04 05 04 03 03 02 02 01 01 Restored Bird Habitat Natural Surface Trails Existing Parking Lot Westcott St. Memorial Drive 06 Garden Club of Houston Project 05 06 04 1” = 300’ 150’0’ 300’ 600’PLAN - HOGG BIRD SANCTUARY
  • 134. ¥ ¥ Project Objectives: To restore a section of Hogg Bird Sanctuary by removing exotic invasive plants and replanting with appropriate native species to create healthy habitat for birds and other wildlife. To educate the Houston community about habitat restoration and its importance to birds. GARDEN CLUB OF HOUSTON HOGG BIRD PROJECT (IN PROGRESS)
  • 135. ARTIST'S RENDERING: HOGG BIRD WALKING TRAIL
  • 136. 1” = 1000’ 500’0’ 1000’ 2000’ Trailhead Maintenance Area Eastern Glades Fitness Center/Natatorium Tennis Center Golf Course Memorial Groves Rugby Pitch Sports Complex OAR Cycle Track and Trails Bayou Wilds Hogg Bird Sanctuary MASTER PLAN Running Center and Timing Track Land Bridge
  • 138.