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LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used
Maritime Terms
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Abandon ship! – The 3rd
phase of ship’s
emergency. An imperative to leave the vessel
immediately, usually in the face of some imminent
danger.
 Aboard – in a vessel .
 Above board – On or above the deck, in plain view,
not hiding anything.
 Accommodation ladder – A portable flight of steps
down a ship's side.
 Adrift – It implies that a vessel is not under control
and therefore goes where the wind and current
take her.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Aft – Towards the stern or rear part of the vessel
 Aground – Resting on or touching the ground or
bottom.
 All hands – Entire ship's company, both officers
and enlisted personnel.
 Alongside – By the side of a ship or pier.
 Anchor – An object designed to prevent or slow
the drift of a ship, attached to the ship by a line or
chain; typically a metal, hook-like or plough-like
object designed to grip the bottom under the body
of water.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Anchorage – A suitable place for a ship to anchor.
Area of a port or harbour.
 Ashore – On the beach, shore or land.
 Astern – towards the stern (rear) of a vessel,
behind a vessel.
 Berth - refers to where the ship docks or a bed or
sleeping accommodation on a boat or ship.
 Bilge – The compartment at the bottom of the hull
of a ship or boat where water collects and must be
pumped out of the vessel.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Boat – A small craft or vessel designed to float on,
and provide transport over, or under, water.
 Boatswain or bosun – A non-commissioned officer
responsible for the sails, ropes rigging and boats
on a ship who issues "piped" commands to
seamen.
 Bow – The front of a ship.
 Bow thrusters – A small propeller or water-jet at
the bow, used for manoeuvring larger vessels at
slow speed. May be mounted externally, or in a
tunnel running through the bow from side to side.
 Bridge – the navigational center of the ship
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Bulkhead – An upright wall within the hull of a
ship. Particularly a watertight, load-bearing wall.
 Cabin – an enclosed room on a deck or flat.
 Cabin boy – attendant on passengers and crew
accommodations.
 Cabin Steward - Responsible for cleaning the
guest rooms.
 Captain - The over-all responsible for the entire
operation of the vessel.
 Catamaran – A vessel with two hulls.
 Ceiling – deckhead
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Chief Engineer - He is the over-all in charge of the
mechanical operations of the ship.
 Chief Housekeeper Responsible for the overall
cleanliness of the cabins and public areas.
 Chief Purser - Responsible for the operation of the
front office including port clearances of
immigration, customs
 Clean bill of health – A certificate issued by a port
indicating that the ship carries no infectious
diseases.
 Companionway – A raised and windowed
hatchway in the ship's deck, with a ladder leading
below and the hooded entrance-hatch to the main
cabins.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Corridor – alleyway
 Croupier - Casino dealer
 Cruise Director - Responsible for all the
entertainments and activities onboard.
 Cruise Staff - Responsible for hosting all the
activities onboard.
 Deck hand – A person whose job involves aiding
the deck supervisor in (un)mooring, anchoring,
maintenance, and general evolutions on deck.
 Deck head – The under-side of the deck above.
Sometimes panelled over to hide the pipe work.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Decks – the structures forming the approximately
horizontal surfaces in the ship's general structure.
Unlike flats, they are a structural part of the ship.
 Displacement – The weight of water displaced by
the immersed volume of a ship's hull, exactly
equivalent to the weight of the whole ship.
 Dressing down - A verbal reprimand.
 Dunnage – Loose packing material used to protect
a ship's cargo from damage during transport. Or
Personal baggage.
 First Mate – The Second in command of a ship.
 Fore, foreward – Towards the bow (of the vessel).
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Galley – the kitchen of the ship
 Gangplank – A movable bridge used in boarding
or leaving a ship at a pier; also known as a "brow".
 Gangway – An opening in the bulwark of the ship
to allow passengers to board or leave the ship.
 Grounding – When a ship (while afloat) touches
the bed of the sea, or goes "aground".
 Gunport — The opening in the side of the ship or
in a turret through which the gun fires or
protrudes.
 Harbor – A harbor or harbour, or haven, is a place
where ships may shelter from the weather or are
stored. Harbours can be man-made or natural.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Hatchway, hatch – A covered opening in a ship's
deck through which cargo can be loaded or
access made to a lower deck; the cover to the
opening is called a hatch.
 Helm – the wheel and/or wheelhouse area. Also
see wheelhouse.
 Helmsman – A person who steers a ship
 Hotel Manager - Responsible of the overall
operation of the hotel department of the vessel.
 Hull – The shell and framework of the basic
flotation-oriented part of a ship.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Hydrofoil – A boat with wing-like foils mounted on
struts below the hull, lifting the hull entirely out of
the water at speed and allowing water resistance
to be greatly reduced.
 Knot – A unit of speed: 1 nautical mile (1.8520 km;
1.1508 mi) per hour.
 Ladder – On board a ship, all "stairs" are called
ladders, except for literal staircases aboard
passenger ships.
 Lifebelt, lifejacket, life preserver or Mae West – A
device such as a buoyant ring or inflatable jacket
which keeps a person afloat in the water.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Lifeboat – kept on board a vessel and used to take
crew and passengers to safety in the event of the
ship being abandoned.
 Liferaft – An inflatable, covered raft, used in the
event of a vessel being abandoned.
 Liner – modern term for prestigious passenger
vessels: ocean liner.
 List – The vessel's angle of lean or tilt to one side,
in the direction called roll. Typically refers to a
lean caused by flooding or improperly loaded or
shifted cargo (as opposed to 'heeling', which see).
 Maitre D’ - The Headwaiter
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Man overboard! – A cry let out when a seaman has
gone 'overboard' (fallen from the ship into the
water).
 Marina – a docking facility for small ships and
yachts.
 Master – A short for master mariner the license of
a ship’s captain
 Mess / messhall – An eating place aboard ship. A
group of crew who live and feed together,
 Nautical mile – A distance of 1.852 kilometres
(1.151 mi). A speed of one nautical mile per hour
is called a knot.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Pilot – Navigator. A specially knowledgeable
person qualified to navigate a vessel through
difficult waters, e.g. harbour pilot etc.
 Pontoon – A flat-bottomed vessel used as a ferry,
barge, car float or a float moored alongside a jetty
or a ship to facilitate boarding.
 Port - the right side of the ship looking forward
 Porthole or port – an opening in a ship's side, esp.
a round one for admitting light and air, fitted with
thick glass and, often, a hinged metal cover, a
window
 Provision Master - Responsible in ordering and
keeping the ship’s food and drink supplies
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Pusser – Purser, the person who buys, stores and
sells all stores on board non-passenger ships,
including victuals, rum and tobacco. Originally a
private merchant, latterly a warrant officer.
 Radio Officer - Responsible for the ship’s
communication system.
 Set-back - to turn back time by an hour.
 Set-forward - to advance time by an hour.
 Ship's company – The crew of a ship.
 Shoal – Shallow water that is a hazard to
navigation.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Skipper – The captain of a ship.
 Slop chest – A ship's store of merchandise, such
as clothing, tobacco, etc., maintained aboard
merchant ships for sale to the crew.
 Sommelier - Responsible for serving wine
 Staff Captain - The second in command, oversees
day to day operations as directed by the captain.
 Starboard – Towards the right-hand side of a
vessel facing forward. Denoted with a green light
at night.
 Steerage – is the third-class level of the RMS
Titanic for the masses.
LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY
College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management
Commonly Used Maritime Terms
 Stern – The rear part of a ship, technically defined
as the area built up over the sternpost.
 Stowage – the amount of room for storing
materials on board a ship.
 Stowaway – A trespasser on a ship; a person
aboard a ship without permission and/or without
payment, and usually boards undetected, remains
hidden aboard, and jumps ship just before making
port or reaching a port's dock.
 Wall – bulkheads

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Maritime terms

  • 1. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms
  • 2. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Abandon ship! – The 3rd phase of ship’s emergency. An imperative to leave the vessel immediately, usually in the face of some imminent danger.  Aboard – in a vessel .  Above board – On or above the deck, in plain view, not hiding anything.  Accommodation ladder – A portable flight of steps down a ship's side.  Adrift – It implies that a vessel is not under control and therefore goes where the wind and current take her.
  • 3. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Aft – Towards the stern or rear part of the vessel  Aground – Resting on or touching the ground or bottom.  All hands – Entire ship's company, both officers and enlisted personnel.  Alongside – By the side of a ship or pier.  Anchor – An object designed to prevent or slow the drift of a ship, attached to the ship by a line or chain; typically a metal, hook-like or plough-like object designed to grip the bottom under the body of water.
  • 4. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Anchorage – A suitable place for a ship to anchor. Area of a port or harbour.  Ashore – On the beach, shore or land.  Astern – towards the stern (rear) of a vessel, behind a vessel.  Berth - refers to where the ship docks or a bed or sleeping accommodation on a boat or ship.  Bilge – The compartment at the bottom of the hull of a ship or boat where water collects and must be pumped out of the vessel.
  • 5. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Boat – A small craft or vessel designed to float on, and provide transport over, or under, water.  Boatswain or bosun – A non-commissioned officer responsible for the sails, ropes rigging and boats on a ship who issues "piped" commands to seamen.  Bow – The front of a ship.  Bow thrusters – A small propeller or water-jet at the bow, used for manoeuvring larger vessels at slow speed. May be mounted externally, or in a tunnel running through the bow from side to side.  Bridge – the navigational center of the ship
  • 6. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Bulkhead – An upright wall within the hull of a ship. Particularly a watertight, load-bearing wall.  Cabin – an enclosed room on a deck or flat.  Cabin boy – attendant on passengers and crew accommodations.  Cabin Steward - Responsible for cleaning the guest rooms.  Captain - The over-all responsible for the entire operation of the vessel.  Catamaran – A vessel with two hulls.  Ceiling – deckhead
  • 7. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Chief Engineer - He is the over-all in charge of the mechanical operations of the ship.  Chief Housekeeper Responsible for the overall cleanliness of the cabins and public areas.  Chief Purser - Responsible for the operation of the front office including port clearances of immigration, customs  Clean bill of health – A certificate issued by a port indicating that the ship carries no infectious diseases.  Companionway – A raised and windowed hatchway in the ship's deck, with a ladder leading below and the hooded entrance-hatch to the main cabins.
  • 8. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Corridor – alleyway  Croupier - Casino dealer  Cruise Director - Responsible for all the entertainments and activities onboard.  Cruise Staff - Responsible for hosting all the activities onboard.  Deck hand – A person whose job involves aiding the deck supervisor in (un)mooring, anchoring, maintenance, and general evolutions on deck.  Deck head – The under-side of the deck above. Sometimes panelled over to hide the pipe work.
  • 9. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Decks – the structures forming the approximately horizontal surfaces in the ship's general structure. Unlike flats, they are a structural part of the ship.  Displacement – The weight of water displaced by the immersed volume of a ship's hull, exactly equivalent to the weight of the whole ship.  Dressing down - A verbal reprimand.  Dunnage – Loose packing material used to protect a ship's cargo from damage during transport. Or Personal baggage.  First Mate – The Second in command of a ship.  Fore, foreward – Towards the bow (of the vessel).
  • 10. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Galley – the kitchen of the ship  Gangplank – A movable bridge used in boarding or leaving a ship at a pier; also known as a "brow".  Gangway – An opening in the bulwark of the ship to allow passengers to board or leave the ship.  Grounding – When a ship (while afloat) touches the bed of the sea, or goes "aground".  Gunport — The opening in the side of the ship or in a turret through which the gun fires or protrudes.  Harbor – A harbor or harbour, or haven, is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. Harbours can be man-made or natural.
  • 11. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Hatchway, hatch – A covered opening in a ship's deck through which cargo can be loaded or access made to a lower deck; the cover to the opening is called a hatch.  Helm – the wheel and/or wheelhouse area. Also see wheelhouse.  Helmsman – A person who steers a ship  Hotel Manager - Responsible of the overall operation of the hotel department of the vessel.  Hull – The shell and framework of the basic flotation-oriented part of a ship.
  • 12. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Hydrofoil – A boat with wing-like foils mounted on struts below the hull, lifting the hull entirely out of the water at speed and allowing water resistance to be greatly reduced.  Knot – A unit of speed: 1 nautical mile (1.8520 km; 1.1508 mi) per hour.  Ladder – On board a ship, all "stairs" are called ladders, except for literal staircases aboard passenger ships.  Lifebelt, lifejacket, life preserver or Mae West – A device such as a buoyant ring or inflatable jacket which keeps a person afloat in the water.
  • 13. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Lifeboat – kept on board a vessel and used to take crew and passengers to safety in the event of the ship being abandoned.  Liferaft – An inflatable, covered raft, used in the event of a vessel being abandoned.  Liner – modern term for prestigious passenger vessels: ocean liner.  List – The vessel's angle of lean or tilt to one side, in the direction called roll. Typically refers to a lean caused by flooding or improperly loaded or shifted cargo (as opposed to 'heeling', which see).  Maitre D’ - The Headwaiter
  • 14. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Man overboard! – A cry let out when a seaman has gone 'overboard' (fallen from the ship into the water).  Marina – a docking facility for small ships and yachts.  Master – A short for master mariner the license of a ship’s captain  Mess / messhall – An eating place aboard ship. A group of crew who live and feed together,  Nautical mile – A distance of 1.852 kilometres (1.151 mi). A speed of one nautical mile per hour is called a knot.
  • 15. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Pilot – Navigator. A specially knowledgeable person qualified to navigate a vessel through difficult waters, e.g. harbour pilot etc.  Pontoon – A flat-bottomed vessel used as a ferry, barge, car float or a float moored alongside a jetty or a ship to facilitate boarding.  Port - the right side of the ship looking forward  Porthole or port – an opening in a ship's side, esp. a round one for admitting light and air, fitted with thick glass and, often, a hinged metal cover, a window  Provision Master - Responsible in ordering and keeping the ship’s food and drink supplies
  • 16. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Pusser – Purser, the person who buys, stores and sells all stores on board non-passenger ships, including victuals, rum and tobacco. Originally a private merchant, latterly a warrant officer.  Radio Officer - Responsible for the ship’s communication system.  Set-back - to turn back time by an hour.  Set-forward - to advance time by an hour.  Ship's company – The crew of a ship.  Shoal – Shallow water that is a hazard to navigation.
  • 17. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Skipper – The captain of a ship.  Slop chest – A ship's store of merchandise, such as clothing, tobacco, etc., maintained aboard merchant ships for sale to the crew.  Sommelier - Responsible for serving wine  Staff Captain - The second in command, oversees day to day operations as directed by the captain.  Starboard – Towards the right-hand side of a vessel facing forward. Denoted with a green light at night.  Steerage – is the third-class level of the RMS Titanic for the masses.
  • 18. LYCEUM OF THE PHILIPPINES UNIVERSITY College of International Tourism and Hospitality Management Commonly Used Maritime Terms  Stern – The rear part of a ship, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost.  Stowage – the amount of room for storing materials on board a ship.  Stowaway – A trespasser on a ship; a person aboard a ship without permission and/or without payment, and usually boards undetected, remains hidden aboard, and jumps ship just before making port or reaching a port's dock.  Wall – bulkheads