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Visual Connexion - VIEW CONFERENCE 2017 MASTERCLASS

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Demonstrating the effects of priming,
how people can be susceptible to such suggestions
and how to solve it with Design, our brain process
and connective intelligentsia.

Published in: Design
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Visual Connexion - VIEW CONFERENCE 2017 MASTERCLASS

  1. 1. D/17
  2. 2. de•sign [dəzajn] Simone Favarin Senior Digital Designer – Experience Architect - Researcher Author of Visual Connexion methodology - Co-Founder of tNotice, inPoste S.p.A. it.linkedin.com/in/phate D/17
  3. 3. A little intro… D/17
  4. 4. Original Photo - Cherasco, CN (Italy)
  5. 5. 1 Design Thinking 2 Mind Design 3 Visual Connexion D/17
  6. 6. Objectives Demonstrating the effects of priming, how people can be susceptible to such suggestions and how to solve it with Design, our brain process and connective intelligentsia. D/17
  7. 7. de•sign [dəzajn] Design is a way of thinking, of determining people’s true, underlying needs, and then delivering products and services that help them. D/17
  8. 8. Design thinking is a user-centered approach to problem solving D/17
  9. 9. #1 People-centered Empathy is key. It’s not about you. You need the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. D/17
  10. 10. #2 Integrative Thinking You need the ability to look at all the different aspects of a problem D/17
  11. 11. #3 Failure is Key Failure is a (necessary) part of the process in order to succeed. D/17
  12. 12. #4 Iterative The more you are able to loop through “understand > create > learn” the higher chance you have for good results. D/17
  13. 13. “The Process of Design Squiggle” by Damien Newman, Central Office of Design D/17
  14. 14. There is not one single process or toolkit that serves every single case. There is a wide variety of processes and tools that people customize to serve their needs. D/17
  15. 15. Coachella Festival D/17
  16. 16. Human-centered designers always start from the place of not knowing the answer to the problem they’re looking to solve. By embracing that ambiguity, and by trusting that the human-centered design process will guide us toward an innovative answer, we actually give ourselves permission to be fantastically creative. Source: http://www.designkit.org/mindsets/5/ D/17
  17. 17. Psychology is the science of behavior and mind, embracing all aspects of conscious and unconscious experience as well as thought. D/17
  18. 18. During the 1960s, a new perspective known as cognitive psychology began to take hold. This area of psychology focuses on mental processes such as memory, thinking, problem solving, language and decision-making. D/17
  19. 19. The sociocultural perspective maintains that behavior and mental processes are shaped not only by prior learning experiences or intra-psychic forces, but also by the social or cultural context. D/17
  20. 20. Dialectic Progression of Ideas: Hegel Thesis Antithesisflaws/alt idea Synthesis: best of both New Thesis flaws/alt idea D/17
  21. 21. Experiments Psychobiological studies Self report Case studies Naturalistic Observation Computer Simulations Cognitive Methods D/17
  22. 22. D/17 Data can only be fully explained with theories, and theories are insufficient without data – thus creating the cycle of science.
  23. 23. Cognitive processes interact with each other and with non-cognitive processes - Emotions may affect decisions - Perception contributes to memory decisions D/17
  24. 24. Matrix for Managing Complex Change Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan = Change = Confusion = Anxiety = Resistance = Frustration = False Starts Adapted from Knoster, T., Villa R., & Thousand, J. (2000). A framework for thinking about systems change. In R. villa & J. Thousand (Eds.), Restructuring for caring and effective education: Piecing the puzzle together (pp. 93-128). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. D/17
  25. 25. According to Lewin (1948), a group can be defined as a totality based on interdependence. The common destiny, the goal, is both an expression and a product of this interdependence. Each group is characterized by peculiar, pliable dynamics. D/17
  26. 26. How to make the most of these group dynamics? How to identify and reach the common goal? D/17
  27. 27. Three key concepts understand the link between social processes and cognitive processes take note of bias of behavior and stereotypes, to which no human being is immune reflect the rules of construction D/17
  28. 28. Brain Technology D/17
  29. 29. People love to think their intuitions are correct or they are otherwise able to logically analyze every situation D/17 Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  30. 30. We jump to conclusions to save time D/17 Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  31. 31. D/17
  32. 32. Benefits of recognizing Biases - Better design - More efficient workplaces/home/life - Low level of anxiety and more happiness D/17
  33. 33. Confirmation bias: defined by Skinner (psychologist - 1953) as "cognitive dissonance", this bias involves the behavior that leads us to refer to those who are not only in agreement with us but feed and reinforce our convictions. D/17
  34. 34. Group bias: when we are part of a group, the behavior trend is to believe that it is rich in success because of its own internal qualities, other than the low-value features of other surrounding groups. D/17
  35. 35. Gabler's Fallacy Bias: describes the tendency to interpret the present based on what happened in the past. It therefore triggers a vicious circle that, if in the negative form, can help lower the self-esteem and quality of the group. D/17
  36. 36. Error Bias by Similarity or Contrast: in a group, a leader who has a strong self esteem will tend to involve individuals who are imitating him for behaviors and features; on the contrary, a leader with low self-esteem will reward those who will overcome their shortcomings. D/17
  37. 37. Bias of the status quo: when the change scares, this bias entails fossilizing on decisions and positions taken in the past, with the consequence of instilling the conviction that a different approach can only worsen the current situation. D/17
  38. 38. Negative bias: this is a dangerous distortion because it puts the negative and negative events in the foreground underestimating the positive ones that could act as leverage to solve the group's issues. D/17
  39. 39. we create our own aquariums D/17
  40. 40. In other words, we can say that the cognitive and social processes that influence us are distortions, prejudicial interpretations, stereotypes. D/17
  41. 41. Focus on this: D/17
  42. 42. D/17
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  44. 44. D/17
  45. 45. D/17 Focus on this:
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  47. 47. D/17
  48. 48. D/17
  49. 49. Motivational System D/17
  50. 50. Goal hampered Goal approached or reached Attachment system fear and anger comfort sadness joy desolation Safety emotional detachment affiliation love trust Caring System anxious solicitude protective tenderness compassion joy guilt parental love Sexual System modesty erotic desire fear erotic pleasure jealousy erotic love Competitive System fear (by judgment) anger (by challenge) shame triumph, power humiliation pride sadness, envy feeling of superiority Cooperative System guilt, remorse anger (by challenge) insulation mutual loyalty, joy (by sharing) distrust confidence resentment friendship love AIMIT Manual Motivational Systems in clinical dialogue, (Liotti G., Monticelli F.) - Milano : Raffaello Cortina, 2008 ITICCUMIL0758528 D/17
  51. 51. Visual Connexion D/17
  52. 52. Perception Thanks to the co-analysis, we disengage from our own perception and interpretation of reality and rely on a specially designed software for the actual big picture of the situation. D/17
  53. 53. Visualize The Visual Connexion Method puts in field a participatory and proactive analysis. Status and hierarchies are suspended - as well as internal conflicts - depending on the good performance of the group, and a specific work method is provided, a step-by-step process to follow. D/17
  54. 54. Resolution Applying an additive and non-disjunctive logic, it utilizes a communication network, a structure, circular and non-vertical, which is just the most effective to complete complex tasks. The problem is solved, the group can proceed with the definition of project timing and all related details. D/17
  55. 55. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You
  56. 56. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You
  57. 57. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION YouA B
  58. 58. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You Truth
  59. 59. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You Reality perceived Truth Bias Cognitive Structure Beliefs
  60. 60. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You
  61. 61. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You
  62. 62. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You
  63. 63. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION General Environment
  64. 64. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION Hierarchy
  65. 65. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION
  66. 66. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION
  67. 67. Visual Connexion D/17
  68. 68. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION
  69. 69. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION
  70. 70. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION You Reality perceived Truth Bias Cognitive Structure Beliefs
  71. 71. SIMONE FAVARIN | VISUAL CONNEXION Truth
  72. 72. D/17
  73. 73. Who What Why D/17 Cycle Time (40 minutes each)
  74. 74. D/17
  75. 75. Benefits of Visual Connexion - Better design - Less errors of analysis - More efficient problem solving - Low level of anxiety and more happiness - More intercreative solutions - More energy perceived - More perceived confidence D/17
  76. 76. METHOD REFERENCE AIMIT Manual Motivational Systems in clinical dialogue, (Liotti G., Monticelli F.) Milano : Raffaello Cortina, 2008 ITICCUMIL0758528 The role of brain emotional systems in addictions: a neuro-evolutionary perspective and new ‘self-report’ animal model Jaak Panksepp, Brian Knutson & Jeff Burgdorf - Submitted 1 November 2000; initial review completed 22 February 2001; final version accepted 6 August 2001 The Archaeology of Mind: Neuroevolutionary Origins of Human Emotions (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) Hardcover – September 17, 2012 - by Jaak Panksepp (Author), Lucy Biven (Author) Thinking Fast & Slow (Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1 edizione (25 ottobre 2011) by Daniel Kahneman D/17
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  78. 78. simonefavarin.com +39 347 75 73 003 askto@simonefavarin.com dphate@gmail.com COPYRIGHT © 2003/2017 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED TO SIMONEFAVARIN contact now

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