CHAPTER 8 SECTION 4-THE GROWTH
OF NATIONALISM AND THE ELECTION
OF 1824
Periods D/G
March 12/13, 2014
Objectives
 By the end of today’s class, you should be
able to:
Describe nationalism home and abroad.
Identify the Monroe...
The Growth of Nationalism
 After the War of 1812, Nationalism surges.
Americans are becoming more self confident and
enco...
he Supreme Court-Nationalism at
Home
 Led by Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court became a strong
support of na...
The Supreme Court
(2) Gibbons v. Ogden
-Background: A New York state law gave to individuals the exclusive
right to operat...
Nationalism Abroad-The Monroe
Doctrine
 At age 58, James Monroe is elected
President in 1817. Monroe is next in
the “Virg...
The Monroe Doctrine
 During his message to Congress, President
Monroe essentially declared that the United
States would n...
The Election of 1824
 In 1824, there was no clear favorite to win the
election for President of the US. Candidate
Adams w...
John Quincy Adams
 He was the son of John
Adams, the only Federalist
president.
 Adams was Monroe’s
Secretary of State-n...
Henry Clay
 Secretary of State, and Speaker
of the House.
 From Kentucky, he was the
favorite son of the West.
 Clay is...
William Crawford
 William H. Crawford of Georgia
was born in Virginia and hoped
to continue the “Virginia
Dynasty”.
 For...
Andrew Jackson
 He was a Senator from Tennessee and
military hero.
 Jackson's reputation as an Indian fighter
and wester...
No Winner!
 Jackson receives the most popular votes and
electoral votes, but he was not declared winner
since he did not ...
The Corrupt Bargain
 Clay, as Speaker of the House, used his influence
to sway the vote towards Adams. Although they
were...
Election of 1828
 Whether or not a deal was actually done became
irrelevant. Adams was an inept president and his
adminis...
Homework
 For homework, please finish the Jackson
Ticket.
 Summarize the following sections of Chapter 8
Section 5:
-Jac...
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  1. 1. CHAPTER 8 SECTION 4-THE GROWTH OF NATIONALISM AND THE ELECTION OF 1824 Periods D/G March 12/13, 2014
  2. 2. Objectives  By the end of today’s class, you should be able to: Describe nationalism home and abroad. Identify the Monroe Doctrine and it’s important points. Identify the candidates in the Election of 1824, discuss the outcomes, and describe the term “corrupt bargain.”
  3. 3. The Growth of Nationalism  After the War of 1812, Nationalism surges. Americans are becoming more self confident and encourage economic growth.  People begin to realize themselves as part of a country instead of separate states. People view themselves as 1 country, under a national government.  Madison inspired the postwar wave of nationalism through economic development and military expansion.
  4. 4. he Supreme Court-Nationalism at Home  Led by Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court became a strong support of nationalism. These decisions strengthened the Federal Government’s role in the economy. (1) McCulloch v. Maryland: (1819) -Background: In 1816, Congress chartered the Second Bank of the United States. In 1818, Maryland passed legislation to impose taxes on the bank. Cashier, James McCulloch refused to pay the tax. -Issues: Does Congress have the authority to establish the bank? Did the Maryland law interfere with congressional powers. -Results: In a unanimous decision, the Court held that Congress had the power to incorporate the bank and that Maryland could not tax instruments of the national government. Chief Justice Marshall noted that Congress possessed implied powers not explicitly outlined in the Constitution. Balance between state and federal power.
  5. 5. The Supreme Court (2) Gibbons v. Ogden -Background: A New York state law gave to individuals the exclusive right to operate steamboats on waters within state jurisdiction. Issue: Thomas Gibbons -- a steamboat owner who did business between New York and New Jersey under a federal coastal license -- challenged the monopoly license granted by New York to Aaron Ogden. Results: In an unanimous decision, the Court found that New York's licensing requirement for out-of-state operators was inconsistent with a congressional act regulating the coasting trade. Regulation of navigation by steamboat operators and others for purposes of conducting interstate commerce was a power reserved to and exercised by the Congress. So, the power to regulate interstate commerce was granted to Congress.
  6. 6. Nationalism Abroad-The Monroe Doctrine  At age 58, James Monroe is elected President in 1817. Monroe is next in the “Virginian Dynasty” (Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison)  The most notable moment in his administration was the Monroe Doctrine. The Monroe Doctrine was a policy of the United States introduced on December 2, 1823. Monroe, was concerned about Spain reclaiming sovereignty in the Western Hemisphere.  So, he asks former Presidents, Jefferson and Madison for advice. Both told Monroe to join forces with Britain (not what he wanted to hear!) However, John Quincy Adams suggests the US “go at it alone.”
  7. 7. The Monroe Doctrine  During his message to Congress, President Monroe essentially declared that the United States would not tolerate intervention in the America’s by European nations. Monroe also promised that the United States would not interfere with already established colonies/governments in Europe.  In one sense, the Monroe Doctrine can be viewed as an act of isolationism. Also was referred to as “the last step towards independence.” Despite the popularity of the Monroe Doctrine at home, it carried virtually no force.
  8. 8. The Election of 1824  In 1824, there was no clear favorite to win the election for President of the US. Candidate Adams was known as a “monarchist” with an English wife. Clay was known as a drunkard and gambler. Jackson was known as a “murderer.”  The Election of 1824 featured 4 candidates from the same political party. Despite their flaws, these men were called “favorite son” candidates and were very popular in their own area of the country.  Let’s explore the 4 candidates.
  9. 9. John Quincy Adams  He was the son of John Adams, the only Federalist president.  Adams was Monroe’s Secretary of State-not automatic he would be President.  He was the favorite son of the Northeast.  He favored a high protective tariff, was against slavery, and supported the freedom of
  10. 10. Henry Clay  Secretary of State, and Speaker of the House.  From Kentucky, he was the favorite son of the West.  Clay is the most visible candidate, known as being a gifted speaker.  Supports the American system of tariffs.  Slave holder, but he disapproves of it as a system -South doesn’t like him.  Because of differing views, he and Adams dislike one another.
  11. 11. William Crawford  William H. Crawford of Georgia was born in Virginia and hoped to continue the “Virginia Dynasty”.  Former secretary of war, he was the favorite son of the South.  He has the support of members of Congress, but has a temper!  Despite this he emerges as a leading candidate, but he
  12. 12. Andrew Jackson  He was a Senator from Tennessee and military hero.  Jackson's reputation as an Indian fighter and western expansionist, owing to his military escapades in Spanish Florida, gave him national standing above all other candidates  He was one of the favorite sons of the West, since he drew Western support from Clay.  He was referred to “as the next George Washington.”  He is “an outsider” so political views and policies unclear.
  13. 13. No Winner!  Jackson receives the most popular votes and electoral votes, but he was not declared winner since he did not receive a majority of electoral votes.  The 12th Amendment provided that elections in which no candidate received a majority should be decided by the House of Representatives from among the top three candidates  Clay was out of contention and Crawford was an unlikely prospect because of a serious illness.  The race is now between Adams and Jackson. Jackson clearly expected to win, figuring that the House would act to confirm his strong showing.
  14. 14. The Corrupt Bargain  Clay, as Speaker of the House, used his influence to sway the vote towards Adams. Although they were not close, Clay knew that he and Adams shared a common political philosophy.  It is likely that Clay believed Adams was more experienced, but he knew an Adams victory would benefit his career. Clay, wanting nothing to do with furthering the career of Jackson, supposedly received a bargain from Adams.  The bargain was that Clay would forge a coalition with Adams, essentially giving him further votes. In return, Clay is named secretary of state! Jackson and his supporters outraged, called it “corrupt bargain.” Jackson referred to Clay as “The Judas of the West.”
  15. 15. Election of 1828  Whether or not a deal was actually done became irrelevant. Adams was an inept president and his administration was crippled with the “corrupt bargain.”  Jackson, unhappy with the results of the Election of 1824, starts campaigning in 1825 and works hard for the next 3 years ensuring next time he is elected.  The election is a rematch of the Election of 1824, with John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. Jackson will run his campaign based on the policy that he is for and supports the common man.
  16. 16. Homework  For homework, please finish the Jackson Ticket.  Summarize the following sections of Chapter 8 Section 5: -Jacksonian Democracy -Spoils System -Bank Crisis

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