FAUVISMBy Ashley Davis and Sarah Redman
WHAT IS FAUVISM? Bright, unblended colors, usually symbolic Simplified shapes and forms that exaggerate color Loose bru...
WHAT INFLUENCED FAUVISM?   Impressionism/Post-Impressionism     Van Gogh     Cezanne   Pointilism       Seurat
WHAT MOVEMENTS DID FAUVISMINFLUENCE?   Cubism       Orphism Abstract Expressionism Expressionism
CRITIC RESPONSES Critics and Parisians didn‟t like the paintings at all  and actually covered their eyes at the first Fau...
HENRI MATISSE   1869 – 1954   “What I dream of is an art of balance, of    purity, and serenity devoid of troubling or  ...
Luxe, calme et volupté         1904    Henri Matisse
La Joie de Vivre  1905-1906 Henri Matisse
The Open Window     1905  Henri Matisse
Portrait of Madame Matisse            1905       Henri Matisse
Woman With a Hat     1905  Henri Matisse
ANDRE DERAIN 1880 - 1954 “I used color as a means of  expressing my emotion and  not as a transcription of  nature.”
Drying Sails   Boats in Collioure   1905              1905André Derain     André Derain
Self-Portrait in Studio        1903    Andre Derain
Charing Cross Bridge        1906   Andre Derain
Portrait of a man with a      newspaper          1911     Andre Derain
The Pool of London      1906  Andre Derain
Portrait of Henri Matisse           1906     Andre Derain
MAURICE DE VLAMINCK 1876 – 1958 “I wanted to burn down the Ecole  des Beaux-Arts with my cobalts and  vermillions and I ...
Sailing Boat on the Seine          1906  Maurice de Vlaminck
The Circus       1906Maurice de Vlaminck
The Orchard       1905Maurice de Vlaminck
Barge on the Seine at Pecq           1906   Maurice de Vlaminck
Andre Derain       1906Maurice de Vlaminck
GEORGES ROUAULT   1871 – 1958
The Old King     1937Georges Rouault
Femme fière     1936Georges Rouault
Près des fortifications désertiques, je                 naquis                  1929          Georges Rouault
Faubourg     1910Georges Rouault
Apostles     1937Georges Rouault
HOW FAUVISM HAS CHANGED ART Color freedom Talent levels Irregular shapes and forms
Fauvism Lecture
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Fauvism Lecture

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  • Left: Starry Night (1889) by Van GoghMiddle: The Bay from L'Estaque (1886) by CezanneRight: A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884-86) by Seurat
  • Orphism – pure abstraction and bright colors, rely on form and color to communicate meaning. PHOTO - Robert Delaunay, Simultaneous Windows on the City, 1912Abstract Art – mostly the colors influenced this movement PHOTO - Gotham News, 1955, Willem de KooningExpressionism - Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas. Expressionist artists sought to express meaning or emotional experience rather than physical reality PHOTO - The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893)
  • Originally studied law. Used to copy paintings in his student days. He saw the creation of art as a great way to relax your mind and spirit and found it to be a luxurious experience. Originally did dark toned paintings with literary subjects, but discovered Neo-Impressionism and started working with figures and still life with bold colors. Began painting with bright colors as early as 1898. Except for a few select works, he mostly put women into his art because women could be seen as a metaphor for uncorrupted nature. “Le Bonheur de Vivre” was the painting that made him the leader of Fauvism. Was only 36 when he showed his experimental works. Was influenced by Post-Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism to start this style. “La Danse” and other works after Fauvism had ended had similar unnatural colors but were done in a milder tone. Liked African sculptures because the people looked plastic-y and didn’t represent real life
  • •Looks pointillist, but placement of color was more intense than average pointillist works•Greater freedom of point placement•Horizon is in balance with the boat sail (perpendicular) and the tree, diagonal beach ties them all together.
  • •Compiled of pieces of past art from “The Feast of the Gods,” Persian paintings, and cave paintingsFeels sensual, rich color, figures separated spacially and by colors•Independent things are seen put together•The five dancing in the middle are seen again in “The Dance”
  • •Diversity of paint handling was typical in his first Fauvist works•Left bare patches on the canvas to suggest “intense, vibrating light”•Moving toward abstraction•Created a broader, flatter plane to rid sense of atmosphere•Reflect light instead of suggesting depth•The view that should be far into the painting seems to come out, picture within a picture•Metaphor that the painting wasn’t supposed to represent the real world but to give the illusion of perpetual reality•Used different kinds of brushstrokes: o• long, blending vertical sweeps of the brush for the walls•a flurry of short, squiggly marks in the balcony•longer pulls, some vertical, some horizontal, for the sea and sky•The brushstrokes are what create a lack of depth
  • •Used color separately from actual appearance•Sometimes called “The Green Stripe”
  • Loose brushwork, looks unfinished and messy.Painting of his wife.She was actually wearing black when he painted this.
  • Started painting career in landscapes, staring working with Matisse in 1905. Painted “Olive Trees Collioure” with him, was a very interesting painting with abstract color schemes, painted 1905. Paintings shown in Salon de Autome. Mixed views on his paintings. Less emphasis was put into what he was painting and more into his emotional journey. Him and Vlaminck shared studio from 1900-1901. Roots in post-impressionism, later formed Fauvist style. Comissioned by AmbroiseVollard after his viewings at the Salon de Autome. More classic paintings, even with vibrant color. Tried to show primitive wildness during Fauve period. First European artist to find the expressive nature of African sculptures, which he collected, and this opened a new path for modern art•Painted London to counter Monet’s paintings of the city.•Called his London paintings “A complete renewal of expression”•His London paintings followed the vision of the Fauves by using bold colors and contrasting tones to give a different perception of the city.•Later became a successful Neo-Classical painter after briefly trying Cubism.•Only 29 of the 30 London paintings are known and have been displayed but not as a whole collection.•Matisse was actually the man who encouraged him to pursue painting•Serious student of art•Enjoyed the brightness of Fauvism, but the organized and traditional paintings he had been trained in occupied his mind•Stuck to the primary colors•Also a stage designer•Adored women and knew how to paint them without making them overflattered or look forced on the canvas•When he died he was across the road from his house and killed by a moving vehicle•Didn’t stay a fauve because he was too well-educatedHis easy and fluent brushstrokes are similar to those in fine French paintings•His paintings combine vehemence (intensity or forcefulness of expression) of Vlaminck and the culture of Matisse•Looked at things as a whole, unlike impressionists
  • In Boats in Collioure Andre Derain’s style posses pointillism qualities. Uses complementary colors and many colors to show emotional expression. In drying sails the mountains are blue and red because he is trying to portray them in a complementary way because they go perfect together.
  • He uses the basic colors red and blue against the black and white to really make certain parts of the painting stand out.
  • Very bright colors and smooth brush strokes. Colors describe emotions in this piece.
  • The colors are some what unblended in places. Small brushstrokes to convey the sensations of light and shade.
  • •Squeezed paint from the tube directly onto the canvas•Was the only true “wild man” and was always confident•Said that he was Fauvism.•Worked based on instinct more than intellect•Described as a ‘rebel artist’•A self-taught artist•Defied the rules of painting•Preferred painting nature and landscapes, and this is also what he is best known for.•Had never visited a museum and pretended at one point to be illiterate, though he had written many books and memoirs.•Considered a ‘natural Fauve’ because his use of color came from his own nature rather than the nature around him.•Settled in this movement after seeing van Gogh’s and Matisse’s works at the Salon de Independants and in Collioure, respectively.•Used short choppy brush strokes to copy van Gogh•His parents were music teachers and he learned to play the violin at a young age•When he was young he liked to read and none of his early hobbies indicated that he may be a successful modern artist. He even had early attempts at painting in his late teens and he wasn’t very good.•He met Andre Derain when they were about to finish their national service in the army. They decided to paint one afternoon together and rented a studio•He ignored landscape details to express his emotion through bright, unrealistic colors and forceful brushwork•After the war, he painted dark pictures, mostly houses or still life. The war traumatized him.
  • Complementary colors, short strokes in foreground illustrate tension. The colors are more important than the subject because they dominate the canvas.
  • Complementary and analogous colors used. Brighter colors in foreground and darker or cooler colors in background. No depth to the painting because the color eliminates this aspect of the painting.
  • Complimentary colors on trees and analogous colors in foreground. Some black outlines. Loose brushstrokes.
  • Black outlines, lack of depth, analogous colors in foreground and background.
  • Has the same green stripe as in Portrait of Madame Matisse. Lack of realistic color.
  • His family had a lot of artist interests. Was an apprentice to a stained-glass maker and that’s where his art influence comes from. 1890 entered the Ecole des beaux arts (competition) and after he entered that Gustave Moreau became his teacher and Rouault was his favorite student. Competed twice for prix de rome in 1893 and 1895, both without success, but then in 1894 he did win the prize. Participated in Salon de Autome. Met Catholic writer Leon Bloy and he influenced his religious paintings and to show the tragedy of the human condition. A lot of his paintings were watercolor paintings showing prostitutes and clowns. Though he exhibited with the Fauves in 1905 he didn’t really belong in any group. Wrote poetry. •Early canvases actually looked angry•Applied layers of paint until the right hue was found•Used art to illustrate disgust in evils•Prostitutes became the symbol of the downfall of society•Sense of calm and hope of salvation marks him as one of the few actual religious painters•Perfectionist and worked obsessively with lengthly processes•Burned 315 of his paintings at the age of 77 because he knew he couldn’t finish them
  • Glowing colors with thick black outline comes from stain glass window influences. The white flowers show how fragile life is and the power the king has over it.
  • Portraying a prostitute in a darker way because of the way his religion viewed people like this
  • Reminds me of stained glass windows because of the vibrant blue then black outline
  • The colors are taking over the painting. The figures are somewhat distorted with dark black outlines.
  • Started using a darker palette and was more influenced by religion.
  • Is overshadowed by the movements it helped to connect, like Post-Impressionism and Cubism, because it was so short and had few people involved, but it still had a big impact on art freedom today.Before fauvism came along, people were afraid to use color freely or emotionally. People tended to use it realistically and couldn’t imagine straying from what was seen in front of them. Now people paint how they want and can use the Fauve history to influence their style.Fauvism had a simple enough concept that you didn’t have to be professionally trained to be a Fauve artist. Vlaminck was a self-taught artist who didn’t follow traditional art rules and was still very successful. This has encouraged young artists of all skill levels to put themselves out there and make art how they want without having to worry if their art resides in the standards of art.Figures don’t have to be perfectly defined anymore. They can be as detailed or as vague as you want, depending on how you want the figures to be portrayed. If you want a figure to be able to be pretty much anyone, people today will be more likely to create a figure that is blurry or without facial details because the Fauves did it first.
  • Fauvism Lecture

    1. 1. FAUVISMBy Ashley Davis and Sarah Redman
    2. 2. WHAT IS FAUVISM? Bright, unblended colors, usually symbolic Simplified shapes and forms that exaggerate color Loose brushstrokes Distorted figures Mostly portraiture, still life, and landscapes Started in 1905 and lasted for three years First avant-garde style of the 20th century
    3. 3. WHAT INFLUENCED FAUVISM? Impressionism/Post-Impressionism  Van Gogh  Cezanne Pointilism  Seurat
    4. 4. WHAT MOVEMENTS DID FAUVISMINFLUENCE? Cubism  Orphism Abstract Expressionism Expressionism
    5. 5. CRITIC RESPONSES Critics and Parisians didn‟t like the paintings at all and actually covered their eyes at the first Fauvist show. Were angry at the form of art because it looked so savage. The name “Fauves” came from Louis Vauxcelles as a derogatory term to describe their lack of structure in their paintings. “Fauves” literally means “Wild Beasts” Some also found their style confusing
    6. 6. HENRI MATISSE 1869 – 1954 “What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity, and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter.” “The artist only sees old truths in a new light, because there are no new truths.” “Construction by colored surfaces. Search for intensity of color, subject matter being unimportant. Reaction against the diffusion of local tone in light. Light...expressed by a harmony of intensely colored surfaces.” “We move towards serenity through the simplification of ideas and form… Details lessen the purity of the lines, they harm the emotional intensity, and we choose to reject them. It is a question of learning – and perhaps relearning the „handwriting‟ of lines. The aim of painting is not to reflect history, because this can be found in books. We have a higher conception. Through it, the artist expresses his inner vision.”
    7. 7. Luxe, calme et volupté 1904 Henri Matisse
    8. 8. La Joie de Vivre 1905-1906 Henri Matisse
    9. 9. The Open Window 1905 Henri Matisse
    10. 10. Portrait of Madame Matisse 1905 Henri Matisse
    11. 11. Woman With a Hat 1905 Henri Matisse
    12. 12. ANDRE DERAIN 1880 - 1954 “I used color as a means of expressing my emotion and not as a transcription of nature.”
    13. 13. Drying Sails Boats in Collioure 1905 1905André Derain André Derain
    14. 14. Self-Portrait in Studio 1903 Andre Derain
    15. 15. Charing Cross Bridge 1906 Andre Derain
    16. 16. Portrait of a man with a newspaper 1911 Andre Derain
    17. 17. The Pool of London 1906 Andre Derain
    18. 18. Portrait of Henri Matisse 1906 Andre Derain
    19. 19. MAURICE DE VLAMINCK 1876 – 1958 “I wanted to burn down the Ecole des Beaux-Arts with my cobalts and vermillions and I wanted to express my feelings with my brushes without troubling what painting was like before me”
    20. 20. Sailing Boat on the Seine 1906 Maurice de Vlaminck
    21. 21. The Circus 1906Maurice de Vlaminck
    22. 22. The Orchard 1905Maurice de Vlaminck
    23. 23. Barge on the Seine at Pecq 1906 Maurice de Vlaminck
    24. 24. Andre Derain 1906Maurice de Vlaminck
    25. 25. GEORGES ROUAULT 1871 – 1958
    26. 26. The Old King 1937Georges Rouault
    27. 27. Femme fière 1936Georges Rouault
    28. 28. Près des fortifications désertiques, je naquis 1929 Georges Rouault
    29. 29. Faubourg 1910Georges Rouault
    30. 30. Apostles 1937Georges Rouault
    31. 31. HOW FAUVISM HAS CHANGED ART Color freedom Talent levels Irregular shapes and forms

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