Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ch13 instructor

2,276 views

Published on

Ls 120

Published in: Education
  • Ted's collection of plans are some of the best I've seen. If you're a woodworker, you really don't want miss out on this great deal. ▶▶▶ https://t.cn/A62Ye5eM
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • There is a REAL system that is helping thousands of people, just like you, earn REAL money right from the comfort of their own homes. The entire system is made up with PROVEN ways for regular people just like you to get started making money online... the RIGHT way... the REAL way.  http://scamcb.com/ezpayjobs/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Positions Available Now! We currently have several openings for writing workers. ◆◆◆ https://tinyurl.com/vvgf8vz
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Positions Available Now! We currently have several openings for writing workers. ■■■ http://t.cn/AieXSfKU
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • MADE $30 ON MY FIRST DAY! Being a fresh graduate and having lots of free time, I stumbled upon your site when I was searching for work at home opportunities, good thing I did! Just on my first day of joining I already made $30! Now I'm averaging close to $80 a day just for filling out surveys!  http://t.cn/AieXAuZz
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Ch13 instructor

  1. 1. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 13CHAPTER 13 The JobThe Job Search,Search, Résumés, andRésumés, and Cover LettersCover Letters
  2. 2. Chapter 13, Slide 2Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy 6 8 10 12 or more 1. Workers between the ages of 18 and 38 can expect to have how many different employers? This quiz is intended to pique your interest and dispel some myths about job searching.
  3. 3. Chapter 13, Slide 3Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  greater emphasis on hard skills  greater emphasis on soft skills  switch from job objective to a summary at the top  use of a computer template to prepare one version for all jobs 2. The biggest change in résumé formats over the last decade has been
  4. 4. Chapter 13, Slide 4Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy True False 3. Having your job terminated ranks in the top 10 of the most severe crises in life.
  5. 5. Chapter 13, Slide 5Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  Chronological (arranged around dates of employment, education)  Functional (arranged around skills) 4. What résumé format do recruiters generally prefer?
  6. 6. Chapter 13, Slide 6Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  searching the Internet  sending out hundreds of résumés 5. Many experts in the field of recruiting think that the best way for a college graduate to find a job today is by  networking  reading the classified ads
  7. 7. Chapter 13, Slide 7Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy Monster.com Yahoo! Hot Jobs Company Web sites CareerBuilder.com 6. The best place to look for a job online is at
  8. 8. Chapter 13, Slide 8Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  Potential employers, professional organizations, and friends  Family members, neighbors, and business associates  School alumni and former instructors  Your dentist, your doctor, your insurance agent, and others  All of the choices 7. You’ve heard that “networking” is a good way to find a job. Who should be on your list of people to contact about job leads?
  9. 9. Chapter 13, Slide 9Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  An embedded résumé  All three versions Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  A traditional print-based résumé  A scannable résumé 8. A savvy job candidate would prepare which of the following résumés?
  10. 10. Chapter 13, Slide 10Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e The primary purpose of a cover letter is to request an interview. Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy True False 9. The primary purpose of a cover letter is to ask for a job.
  11. 11. Chapter 13, Slide 11Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  KISS strategy  NASA strategy Test Your Job SavvyTest Your Job Savvy  AIDA strategy  STAR strategy 10. During a job interview, you are asked to “tell a time when you . . . .? What strategy should you use to answer such behavioral questions?
  12. 12. Chapter 13, Slide 12Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Identify your interests Evaluate your qualifications Search for a job electronically Learn about careers and choose a path Recognize the changing nature of jobs Search for a job traditionally Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment START HERE
  13. 13. Chapter 13, Slide 13Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Identify your interests.  Do you enjoy working with people, data or things?  Do you need to be your own boss?  How important are salary, benefits, location, and so forth? Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM / DEAN SANDERSON
  14. 14. Chapter 13, Slide 14Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Evaluate your qualifications.  What technology, language, and people skills can you offer?  How can you demonstrate your skills?  Recognize the changing nature of jobs.  Fewer people in permanent positions  More flexible workplace, including telecommuting  Lifelong learning needed to continually update skills Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment
  15. 15. Chapter 13, Slide 15Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Learn about careers and choose a path.  Visit your campus career center, search the Web, use your library.  Take a summer or part-time job in your field.  Volunteer with a nonprofit organization.  Interview someone in your field.  Join professional organizations. Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment
  16. 16. Chapter 13, Slide 16Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Search for a job electronically.  Check the big boards: Monster, CareerBuilder, College Recruiter, Yahoo Hot Jobs.  Use the big boards for information; realize that few people actually find jobs on them.  Look beyond the big boards to corporate Web sites, professional association sites, as well as local employment, niche, and social sites (such as LinkedIn, Plaxo, and Facebook). Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment
  17. 17. Chapter 1, Slide 17Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 13, Slide 17Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing for EmploymentPreparing for Employment  Search for a job traditionally.  Check classified ads.  Check alumni and professional association listings.  Contact companies directly.  Sign up for campus interviews; attend job fairs.  Ask for advice from instructors.  NETWORK, NETWORK, NETWORK!
  18. 18. Chapter 13, Slide 18Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Writing a Customized RésuméWriting a Customized Résumé Preparation  Research the job market. Use newspapers, the Web, and other resources to learn about jobs, qualifications, and employers.  Analyze your strengths. What will sell you for the job you want?  Study other résumés as models. Experiment with formatting.
  19. 19. Chapter 13, Slide 19Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e What is the goal of a customized résumé?
  20. 20. Chapter 13, Slide 20Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Writing a Customized RésuméWriting a Customized Résumé Decide on length Choose a résumé style Arrange the parts
  21. 21. Chapter 13, Slide 21Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Choose aChoose a RésuméRésumé StyleStyle Choose aChoose a RésuméRésumé StyleStyle CHRONOLOGICALCHRONOLOGICAL Focuses on job history with most recent positions listed first Focuses on job history with most recent positions listed first Choosing a Résumé StyleChoosing a Résumé Style
  22. 22. Chapter 13, Slide 22Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Choose aChoose a RésuméRésumé StyleStyle Choose aChoose a RésuméRésumé StyleStyle FUNCTIONALFUNCTIONAL Focuses on skillsFocuses on skills Choosing a Résumé StyleChoosing a Résumé Style
  23. 23. Chapter 13, Slide 23Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e DecideDecide onon LengthLength DecideDecide onon LengthLength Make your résumé as long as needed to sell your skills to recruiters and hiring managers. Make your résumé as long as needed to sell your skills to recruiters and hiring managers. Deciding on LengthDeciding on Length
  24. 24. Chapter 13, Slide 24Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Main HeadingMain Heading Career Objective Career Objective Summary of Qualifications Summary of Qualifications Work Experience Work Experience Special Skills Special Skills Achievements Awards Activities Achievements Awards ActivitiesEducationEducation Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts ArrangeArrange thethe PartsParts ArrangeArrange thethe PartsParts
  25. 25. Chapter 13, Slide 25Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Include a career objective only for a targeted job.  Ideally, name job title, area of specialization, and type of company.  List your name, address, phone, and e- mail address. Heading and Objective Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts
  26. 26. Chapter 13, Slide 26Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Name your degree, date of graduation, and institution.  List your major and GPA.  Give information about your studies, but don’t inventory all your courses.  Present your most impressive skills and accomplishments in a concise list. Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts Summary of Qualifications Education
  27. 27. Chapter 13, Slide 27Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e If your work experience is significant and relevant to the position sought, place this section before education. Describe your experience List your previous jobs Include non- technical skills Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts Work Experience
  28. 28. Chapter 13, Slide 28Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Start with the most recent jobs. Include employer’s name and city, dates of employment (month, year), and most significant title. Salesperson, Kmart, Dayton, Ohio. 4/08 to 5/09 Manager, Fleet Equipment, Kettering, Ohio. 6/09 to present Tax Preparer, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. March, 2009 to present. Sinclair College, Dayton, Ohio List your previous jobs. Arranging the Parts of a RésuméArranging the Parts of a Résumé
  29. 29. Chapter 13, Slide 29Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Prepared state and federal tax returns for individuals with incomes under $25,000. Conducted interviews with over 50 individuals to elicit data regarding taxes. Determined legitimate tax deductions and recorded them accurately. Use action verbs to summarize achievements and skills relevant to your targeted job. Describe your experience Arranging the Parts:Arranging the Parts: Work ExperienceWork Experience
  30. 30. Chapter 13, Slide 30Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Include non- technical skills Organized holiday awards program for 1200 attendees and 140 awardees. Praised by top management for enthusiastic teamwork and excellent communication skills. Give evidence of communication, management, and interpersonal skills. Employers want more than empty assurances. Try to quantify your skills. Arranging the Parts:Arranging the Parts: Work ExperienceWork Experience
  31. 31. Chapter 13, Slide 31Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Highlight your technical skills. All employers seek employees proficient with the Internet, software programs, office equipment, and communication technology tools. Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts Special Skills, Achievements, Awards  Show that you are well-rounded. List awards and extracurricular activities, especially if they demonstrate leadership, teamwork, reliability, loyalty, initiative, efficiency, and self-sufficiency.
  32. 32. Chapter 13, Slide 32Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Listing references directly on your résumé takes up valuable space.  Instead, most recruiters prefer that you bring to the interview a list of individuals willing to discuss your qualifications.  The best references are instructors, your current employer or previous employers, colleagues or subordinates, and other professional contacts. References Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts
  33. 33. Chapter 13, Slide 33Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Sample Reference ListSample Reference List
  34. 34. Chapter 13, Slide 34Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Omit references (unless specifically required).  Look for ways to condense your data.  Double-check for parallel phrasing.  Project professionalism and quality.  Avoid personal pronouns.  Omit humor.  Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer for your print copy.  Know how to send your résumé by e-mail.  Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Arranging the PartsArranging the Parts Additional Tips Proofread!
  35. 35. Chapter 13, Slide 35Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Examine These RésumésExamine These Résumés Discuss ways to improve this poor résumé. Click icon to view an improved version. Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document
  36. 36. Chapter 13, Slide 36Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Textbook Résumé ModelsTextbook Résumé Models (click accompanying icon to view)(click accompanying icon to view) Chronological Résumé Models  Recent college graduate with related experience (Figure 13.7)  Current college student with limited experience (Figure 13.6)  Current university student with limited related experience (Figure 13.8) Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document
  37. 37. Chapter 13, Slide 37Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Textbook Résumé ModelsTextbook Résumé Models (click accompanying icon to view)(click accompanying icon to view) Chronological Résumé Model  University graduate with substantial experience (Figure 13.9) Functional Résumé Model  Recent university graduate with unrelated part-time experience (Figure 13.10) Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document
  38. 38. Chapter 13, Slide 38Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing a Scannable Résumé Maximizing “Hits” Preparing a Plain Text Résumé for E-Mailing Optimizing Your Résumé forOptimizing Your Résumé for Today’s TechnologiesToday’s Technologies
  39. 39. Chapter 13, Slide 39Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing a Scannable RésuméPreparing a Scannable Résumé  Use 10- to 14-point type.  Avoid unusual typefaces, underlining, italics, and double columns.  Be sure your name is on the first line.  List each phone number on its own line.  Use smooth white paper, black ink, and quality printing. Provide white space.  Avoid double columns.  Use smooth white paper, black ink, and quality printing. Provide white space.
  40. 40. Chapter 13, Slide 40Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Maximizing “Hits”Maximizing “Hits”  Focus on specific keywords.  Incorporate words from the job ad.  Use typical headings (Objective, Education, Skills, etc.)  Use accurate names; watch abbreviations.  Describe interpersonal traits and attitudes.  Use more than one page if necessary. Click icon to view scannable résumé Adobe Acrobat Document
  41. 41. Chapter 13, Slide 41Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing a Plain TextPreparing a Plain Text Résumé for E-MailingRésumé for E-Mailing  Follow the tips for scannable résumés.  Reformat with shorter lines (such as 4-inch).  Think about using keyboard characters to enhance format (=== or ~~~).  Move all text to the left.  Save your résumé in plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf).  Test your résumé before sending it. Click icon to view plain text résumé Adobe Acrobat Document
  42. 42. Chapter 13, Slide 42Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Being Honest and EthicalBeing Honest and Ethical  Do not inflate your education, grades, or honors.  Do not enhance job titles.  Do not puff up accomplishments.  Do not alter employment dates.  Do be honest, ethical, and careful.
  43. 43. Chapter 13, Slide 43Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Polishing Your RésuméPolishing Your Résumé  Avoid including anything that could become a basis for discrimination: photograph, age, marital status, national origin, race, etc.  Do not send a photograph.  Don't include your social security number.  Don't include high school information, references, or full addresses of schools or employers.  Don't put the word "résumé" at the top.
  44. 44. Chapter 13, Slide 44Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Submitting Your RésuméSubmitting Your Résumé  Word document  Plain-text, ASCII document  PDF document  Company database  Fax Employers may ask you to submit your résumé in one of these ways:
  45. 45. Chapter 13, Slide 45Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: What Turns Recruiters OffWhat Turns Recruiters Off When Reading Résumés?When Reading Résumés?
  46. 46. Chapter 13, Slide 46Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  “Personal data. That’s a major ‘red flag.’ Also typos, inconsistent punctuation, and huge paragraphs that look like job descriptions.”  “Odd-sized résumés from services saying ‘Presenting the candidacy of . . .’ I don't even read them anymore. They’re a major rip-off.”  “Résumés that show no research; not looking at the employer’s needs.”  “Omissions in terms of dates. And misspellings!” What Turns Recruiters OffWhat Turns Recruiters Off When Reading Résumés?When Reading Résumés?
  47. 47. Chapter 13, Slide 47Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  “Long cover letters and résumés over two pages.”  “Excess cosmetics, substituting form for content. A résumé should look nice but not go overboard.”  “A photo. I have to remove them because managers must be color and gender blind.”  “Not sending the résumé to the right place.” What Turns Recruiters OffWhat Turns Recruiters Off When Reading Résumés?When Reading Résumés?
  48. 48. Chapter 13, Slide 48Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  “The objective. Plus dates when things happened and accomplishments.”  “Information about skills that apply to the job; less about job history and past duties.”  “The candidate’s address and phone number. Lots of people put them only in the cover letter!” What Do Recruiters ConsiderWhat Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé?Most Important in a Résumé?
  49. 49. Chapter 13, Slide 49Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e What Do Recruiters ConsiderWhat Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé?Most Important in a Résumé?  “Valid information in an easy-to-read, attractive style.”  “Meeting the qualifications for the job.”  “The presentation and the objective.”  “A clear objective, backed up with qualifying experience and continuity in the work history.”
  50. 50. Chapter 13, Slide 50Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Body Closing  Address the letter to an individual by name.  For advertised jobs, name the source; include job title, date, and publication.  If someone referred you, name that person.  Show that your qualifications fit the job specifications, show your knowledge of the reader’s business, or show that your special talents will be assets to the company. Opening Writing a Customized, PersuasiveWriting a Customized, Persuasive Cover LetterCover Letter
  51. 51. Chapter 13, Slide 51Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Opening Closing  Demonstrate that your background and training meet the job requirements.  Summarize your principal assets from education, experience, and special skills.  Avoid repeating specific data from your résumé.  Refer to your résumé. Body Writing a Customized, PersuasiveWriting a Customized, Persuasive Cover LetterCover Letter
  52. 52. Chapter 13, Slide 52Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Writing a Customized, PersuasiveWriting a Customized, Persuasive Cover LetterCover Letter Opening Body  Ask for an interview. Consider hooking the request to a statement reviewing your strongest points.  Make it easy to respond. Tell when and where you can be reached (during office hours). Some recruiters prefer that you call them. Closing
  53. 53. Chapter 13, Slide 53Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Model Cover LettersModel Cover Letters Click icon to view solicited cover letter. Click icon to view unsolicited cover letter. Click icon to view e-mail cover letter. Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document Adobe Acrobat Document
  54. 54. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version ENDEND

×