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Ch11 instructor

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Ch11 instructor

  1. 1. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 11CHAPTER 11 ProfessionalismProfessionalism at Work: Businessat Work: Business Etiquette, Ethics,Etiquette, Ethics, Teamwork, andTeamwork, and MeetingsMeetings
  2. 2. Chapter 11, Slide 2Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Defining ProfessionalDefining Professional BehaviorBehavior  Civility – respect for others  Polish – first impressions, voice quality, listening  Manners – proper attire, comportment, dining etiquette  Social intelligence – sensitivity, perception of others and situations  Soft skills – personal qualities, habits, attitudes, communication skills, social graces  Ethics – integrity, honesty, desire to treat others with respect and dignity
  3. 3. Chapter 11, Slide 3Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e How to Be ProfessionalHow to Be Professional on the Jobon the Job  Be punctual.  Speak and write clearly.  Apologize for errors or misunderstandings.  Accept constructive criticism. © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM / JACOB WACKERHAUSEN
  4. 4. Chapter 11, Slide 4Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e How to Be ProfessionalHow to Be Professional on the Jobon the Job © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM / JACOB WACKERHAUSEN  Present yourself pleasantly with good hygiene and grooming.  Choose attractive, not distracting, business attire.  Demonstrate self-control.  Avoid public arguments and disagreements, including in written documents and e-mail.
  5. 5. Chapter 11, Slide 5Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e How to Be ProfessionalHow to Be Professional on the Jobon the Job  Avoid even the smallest lies at all cost.  Pay for services and products promptly.  Keep confidential information confidential.  Avoid vengeful behavior when you feel wronged. © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM / JACOB WACKERHAUSEN
  6. 6. Chapter 11, Slide 6Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e How to Be ProfessionalHow to Be Professional on the Jobon the Job © ISTOCKPHOTO.COM / JACOB WACKERHAUSEN  Follow through on commitments.  Keep promises and deadlines.  Deliver only work of which you can be proud.  Be prepared for meetings.  Show a willingness to share expertise.
  7. 7. Chapter 1, Slide 7Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 7Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Use emphasis to express meaning. Use emphasis to express meaning. Adjust your volume and rate. Adjust your volume and rate. Control your pitch. Control your pitch. Work on your voice quality. Work on your voice quality. Improve your pronunciation. Improve your pronunciation. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool
  8. 8. Chapter 1, Slide 8Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 8Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Improve your pronunciation. Improve your pronunciation. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool naturally – not natcherly accessory – not assessory don’t you – not doncha
  9. 9. Chapter 1, Slide 9Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 9Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Work on your voice quality. Work on your voice quality. Improve your pronunciation. Improve your pronunciation. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool  Do you sound friendly, alert, or positive?  Do you sound angry, slow-witted, or negative?
  10. 10. Chapter 1, Slide 10Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 10Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Control your pitch. Control your pitch. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool  Avoid a flat, monotone voice.  Strive for a variety of pitch patterns. Work on your voice quality. Work on your voice quality.
  11. 11. Chapter 1, Slide 11Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 11Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Adjust your volume and rate. Adjust your volume and rate. Control your pitch. Control your pitch. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool  Speak as loudly or softly as the occasion demands.  Don’t make your listeners strain to hear you.  Don’t speak too rapidly.
  12. 12. Chapter 1, Slide 12Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 11, Slide 12Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Use emphasis to express meaning. Use emphasis to express meaning. Adjust your volume and rate. Adjust your volume and rate. Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool Using YourUsing Your Voice as aVoice as a CommunicationCommunication ToolTool  Stress those words that require emphasis.  A lower pitch and volume make you sound professional or reasonable.
  13. 13. Chapter 11, Slide 13Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Promoting PositivePromoting Positive Workplace RelationsWorkplace Relations  Use correct names and titles.  Choose appropriate workplace topics.  Avoid negative remarks.  Listen to learn.  Give sincere and specific praise.  Act professionally in social situations.
  14. 14. Chapter 11, Slide 14Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Responding ProfessionallyResponding Professionally to Workplace Criticismto Workplace Criticism  Listen without interrupting.  Determine the speaker’s intent.  Acknowledge what you are hearing.  Paraphrase what was said.  Ask for more information if necessary.  Agree—if the comments are accurate.
  15. 15. Chapter 11, Slide 15Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Disagree respectfully and constructively— if you feel the comments made are unfair.  Look for a middle position.  Learn from criticism. Responding ProfessionallyResponding Professionally to Workplace Criticismto Workplace Criticism
  16. 16. Chapter 11, Slide 16Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Offering ConstructiveOffering Constructive Criticism on the JobCriticism on the Job  Mentally outline your conversation.  Use face-to-face communication.  Focus on improvement. Offer to help.  Be specific. Avoid broad generalizations.  Discuss the behavior, not the person.  Use “we” rather than “you.”
  17. 17. Chapter 11, Slide 17Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Encourage two-way communication .  Avoid anger, sarcasm, and a raised voice.  Keep it private. Offering ConstructiveOffering Constructive Criticism on the JobCriticism on the Job
  18. 18. Chapter 11, Slide 18Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Placing Calls Receiving Calls Practicing Professional Telephone,Practicing Professional Telephone, Cell Phone, and Voice Mail EtiquetteCell Phone, and Voice Mail Etiquette
  19. 19. Chapter 11, Slide 19Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Making Calls ProfessionallyMaking Calls Professionally  Plan a mini agenda.  Use a three-point introduction. 1. Your name 2. Your affiliation 3. A brief explanation of why you are calling  Be brisk if you are rushed.
  20. 20. Chapter 11, Slide 20Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Making Calls ProfessionallyMaking Calls Professionally  Be cheerful and accurate.  Be professional and courteous.  Bring it to a close.  Avoid telephone tag.  Leave complete voice-mail messages.
  21. 21. Chapter 11, Slide 21Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Receiving Calls ProfessionallyReceiving Calls Professionally  Answer promptly and courteously.  Identify yourself immediately.  Be responsive and helpful.  Be cautious when answering calls for others.  Take messages carefully.  Leave the line respectfully.  Explain when transferring calls.
  22. 22. Chapter 11, Slide 22Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Using Cell Phones for BusinessUsing Cell Phones for Business  Be courteous to those around you.  Observe wireless-free quiet areas.  Speak in low, conversational tones.  Take only urgent calls.  Drive now, talk later.  Choose a professional ringtone or select vibrate mode.
  23. 23. Chapter 11, Slide 23Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e On the Receiver’s End On the Caller’s End Making the BestMaking the Best Use of Voice MailUse of Voice Mail
  24. 24. Chapter 11, Slide 24Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e On the Receiver’s EndOn the Receiver’s End  Don't overuse voice mail.  Set the number of rings appropriately.  Prepare a professional, concise, friendly greeting.  Test your message.  Change your message as necessary.  Respond to messages promptly.  Plan for vacations and other absences.
  25. 25. Chapter 11, Slide 25Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e On the Caller’s EndOn the Caller’s End  Be prepared to leave a concise, complete message.  Use a professional, courteous tone.  Speak slowly; articulate your words.  Be careful with confidential information.  Don't make assumptions.
  26. 26. Chapter 11, Slide 26Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Becoming a Team Player inBecoming a Team Player in Professional Groups and MeetingsProfessional Groups and Meetings  Better decisions  Faster response  Increased productivity  Greater buy-in  Less resistance to change  Improved employee morale  Reduced risks Why Businesses Forms Teams
  27. 27. Chapter 11, Slide 27Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Becoming a Team Player inBecoming a Team Player in Professional Groups and MeetingsProfessional Groups and Meetings  Setting rules and abiding by them.  Analyzing tasks and defining problems.  Contributing information and ideas  Showing interest by listening actively  Synthesizing points of agreement Positive Team Behaviors
  28. 28. Chapter 11, Slide 28Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Becoming a Team Player inBecoming a Team Player in Professional Groups and MeetingsProfessional Groups and Meetings  Blocking ideas and suggestions of others  Insulting and criticizing others  Wasting the group’s time  Making inappropriate jokes and comments  Failing to stay on task  Withdrawing, failing to participate Negative Team Behaviors
  29. 29. Chapter 11, Slide 29Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Small size, diverse makeup  Agreement on purpose  Agreement on procedures  Ability to confront conflict  Use of good communication techniques  Ability to collaborate rather than compete  Shared leadership  Acceptance of ethical responsibilities Characteristics of SuccessfulCharacteristics of Successful Professional TeamsProfessional Teams
  30. 30. Chapter 11, Slide 30Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings During the meeting Before the meeting Ending the meeting and following up
  31. 31. Chapter 11, Slide 31Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Determine your purpose.  Decide how and where to meet.  Organize an agenda. Include date and place, start and end times, topics in order of priority and names of people responsible, time for each topic, and meeting preparation expected of participants.  Invite participants. During Ending and following upBefore Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings
  32. 32. Chapter 11, Slide 32Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Start the meeting on time.  Summarize the meeting goal, provide background, offer possible solutions, review the tentative agenda, and announce ground rules.  Move the meeting along by encouraging all to participate, discouraging monopolizers, and avoiding digressions. Before Ending and following up During Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings
  33. 33. Chapter 11, Slide 33Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  When the group reaches a consensus, summarize and ask for confirmation.  If conflict develops, encourage each person to speak and let groups decide on a direction to follow. Before Ending and following upDuring Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings
  34. 34. Chapter 11, Slide 34Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e To control dysfunctional group members, lay down rules, seat potentially dysfunctional members strategically, avoid direct eye contact, assign them tasks, ask members to speak in a specific order, interrupt monopolizers, and encourage nontalkers. Before Ending and following upDuring Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings
  35. 35. Chapter 11, Slide 35Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Conclude the meeting at the agreed time.  Summarize decisions.  Review deadlines and responsibilities for action items. DuringBefore Ending and following up Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings
  36. 36. Chapter 11, Slide 36Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  For small groups, try "once around the table."  Thank the group; establish a time for the next meeting.  Return the room to a neat appearance; vacate promptly. Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings DuringBefore Ending and following up
  37. 37. Chapter 11, Slide 37Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Distribute minutes.  Check to see that all assigned tasks are completed by agreed-upon deadlines. Conducting Productive BusinessConducting Productive Business and Professional Meetingsand Professional Meetings DuringBefore Ending and following up
  38. 38. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version ENDEND

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