Shellfish Licensing
in Rhode Island
Structure & Purpose, Status & Trends
Robert Ballou
RI Dept. of Environmental Managemen...
Outline
• Nature & Purpose of Licensing
• RI’s Licensing Program
– History
– Key Principles
– License Types
– Renewals, Up...
Why License?
• Identify participants in the fishery
• Administer regulatory & management
programs
– Convey information & r...
Evolution of RI’s Licensing Program
• Open Access (through mid 1990s)
• 1st Legislative Response: 1st Moratorium (1995 – 1...
Key Aspects of Statute
• Move past boom-and-bust cycles of open access/moratoria
• Grandfather all existing license holder...
Key Aspects of Regulatory Program
• Use of License Endorsements to segregate
access to certain species (restricted/control...
Types of Shellfish Licenses &
Associated Opportunities/Limits
RI Shellfish
Management
Areas
License
Type Endorsements Limits Cost
Full Harvest
Principal Effort (PEL)
Quahog
Soft Shell
Whelk
Other
12 bu/day (3 in MA...
License
Type Species Limits
Management
Area Limits
Cost
RESIDENT
No License Required
Quahogs, Soft
Shell Clams,
Mussels, O...
One Bushel in a Fish Basket
What’s a Bushel???
1 Bushel = 9.3 gallons
One Peck in a Fish Basket
What’s a Peck???
1 Peck = 2.33 gallons = ¼ Bushel
One Peck in a 5 gallon bucket
Licensing Provisions
Key Regulatory Terms
• Actively Fishing – Have fished commercially,
as a licensee, at least 75 days over the
preceding 2 c...
Renewals & Upgrades
Renewals
Anyone may renew their license, provided that they
meet the annual application deadline
Upgra...
Availability of New Shellfish Licenses
License Category Regulatory Standard
CFL
Quahog 2:1 exit/entry ratio, applied to al...
Priority Status for New License Applicants
• New licenses (CFLs w/ Quahog, CFLs w/Soft Shell Clam) are
issued to applicant...
A/P – 2 yrs
Process for Entering and Advancing within the
Commercial Fishing Licensing Program
A/F – 2 yrs
PEL
(Other Fish...
Additional New License Opportunities
• Sale of Business – If you have been actively shellfishing, and if
you sell your ves...
Status & Trends
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015
...
License Type Endorsements Number
MPL N/A 853
PEL
Quahog 398
SS Clam 256
Whelk 146
SF Other 225
CFL
Quahog 158
SS Clam 174
...
Issuance of New Quahog Licenses 2005-
2013
Year Exit/Entry Formula Number
Retired
New Licenses
Issued
2005 3:1 PEL w/QH 14...
Licenses Retired, New Quahog Licenses Issued
2003 - 2013
License Type 2003 Total 2013 Total Net Change
MPL 1191 829 -362
P...
Total Number of Licenses for Quahogs- Grouped by License Type
2012 Quahogger Activity- Grouped by License Type
License
Type
Total
Licenses
Active % Active
Avg # of Days
Fished
Avg Quah...
Number of Active Licenses for Quahogs- Grouped by License Type
22%
# of Days Fished by Active Quahoggers - Grouped by License Type
93 fishers
under 40
years old
Only 19
under 40
full-time
(100+ days)
‘12-‘13‘08-‘11’03-‘07
Non-
Quahog
Shellfish
Other
Shellfish
Other
Whelk
Soft Shell
Clam
Soft Shell
Clam
Other Endorsements...
License Fee Revenues
Management & Policy Issues
• Balancing access to new license opportunities with
maintenance of sustainable fisheries, both...
Shellfish Licensing in Rhode Island: Structure & Purpose, Status & Trends
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Shellfish Licensing in Rhode Island: Structure & Purpose, Status & Trends

1,626 views

Published on

Baseline information on the structure and purpose of RI’s shellfish licensing program, as well as status and trends, with particular focus on commercial and recreational shellfish licenses. Presented by Bob Ballou of the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Shellfish Licensing in Rhode Island: Structure & Purpose, Status & Trends

  1. 1. Shellfish Licensing in Rhode Island Structure & Purpose, Status & Trends Robert Ballou RI Dept. of Environmental Management RI Shellfish Management Plan Stakeholder Meeting September 17, 2013
  2. 2. Outline • Nature & Purpose of Licensing • RI’s Licensing Program – History – Key Principles – License Types – Renewals, Upgrades, Transfers – Issuance of New Licenses • Status and Trends • Management and Policy Issues
  3. 3. Why License? • Identify participants in the fishery • Administer regulatory & management programs – Convey information & requirements – Maintain compliance (enforcement) – Collect Fishery-Dependent Data • Public Health/Food Safety • Revenue Source → Management Programs • Effort Control
  4. 4. Evolution of RI’s Licensing Program • Open Access (through mid 1990s) • 1st Legislative Response: 1st Moratorium (1995 – 1998) • Open Access (1999) • 2nd Legislative Response: 2nd Moratorium (2000)  License Reform Initiative – Phase I (2001) • 3rd Legislative Response: Reform Mandate & 3rd Moratorium (2001 – 2002)  License Reform Initiative – Phase II (2001-2002) • 4th Legislative Response: New Licensing Statute (2002) • DEM Enactment of New Licensing Program (2003)
  5. 5. Key Aspects of Statute • Move past boom-and-bust cycles of open access/moratoria • Grandfather all existing license holders (as of 2002/2003) • By and large, maintain existing fee structure • Recognize the issuance of licenses as a management tool in controlling fishing effort • Establish a system that is adaptable to changing conditions in the fisheries • Improve data collection • Seek to protect and balance three main interests: – RI’s marine fisheries resources – Invested fishermen who rely on commercial fishing for their livelihoods – Those seeking the opportunity to fish on a commercial basis • Where possible and practicable, prioritize the interests of RI residents over non- residents
  6. 6. Key Aspects of Regulatory Program • Use of License Endorsements to segregate access to certain species (restricted/controlled vs. non-restricted/open) • Use of Exit/Entry Ratios to control effort levels – i.e., availability of new license endorsements • Annual process of regulatory review and modification, based on input from industry and advise from RI Marine Fisheries Council
  7. 7. Types of Shellfish Licenses & Associated Opportunities/Limits
  8. 8. RI Shellfish Management Areas
  9. 9. License Type Endorsements Limits Cost Full Harvest Principal Effort (PEL) Quahog Soft Shell Whelk Other 12 bu/day (3 in MAs) 12 bu/day (3 in MAs) 300 pots 3 bu/day scallop/oyster $150 License No Fee for 1st Endorsement $75 each add’l Multipurpose (MPL) N/A Same as PEL $300 Limited Harvest Commercial Fishing (CFL) Quahog Soft Shell Whelk Other 3 bu/day 12 bu/day (3 in MAs) 300 pots 3 bu/day scallop/oyster $50 License $25 for each Endorsement Student *Quahog only 3 bu/day $50 Over 65 *Quahog only 3 bu/day No Fee RI Shellfish Licenses – Commercial RI Resident Only Vessel Declarations $25 for vessels ≤ 25 feet 50¢/ add’l foot > 25
  10. 10. License Type Species Limits Management Area Limits Cost RESIDENT No License Required Quahogs, Soft Shell Clams, Mussels, Oysters ½ bu/day 1 peck/day No Fee Bay Scallop Whelk 1 bu/day 5 pots 1 bu/day 5 pots NON-RESIDENT Yearly Quahogs, Soft Shell Clams, Mussels, Oysters Bay Scallop & Whelk Prohibited 1 peck/day ½ peck/day $200 Landowner (Yearly) Same as yearly Same as yearly Same as yearly $25 14-Day Same as yearly Same as yearly Same as yearly $11 RI Shellfish Licenses – Recreational
  11. 11. One Bushel in a Fish Basket What’s a Bushel??? 1 Bushel = 9.3 gallons
  12. 12. One Peck in a Fish Basket What’s a Peck??? 1 Peck = 2.33 gallons = ¼ Bushel One Peck in a 5 gallon bucket
  13. 13. Licensing Provisions
  14. 14. Key Regulatory Terms • Actively Fishing – Have fished commercially, as a licensee, at least 75 days over the preceding 2 calendar years, with some activity in each year. • Actively Participating – Have fished commercially, as a crew member, at least 75 days over the preceding 2 calendar years, with some activity in each year.
  15. 15. Renewals & Upgrades Renewals Anyone may renew their license, provided that they meet the annual application deadline Upgrades Holders of Student Shellfish licenses, who have been actively fishing their license for two years, may upgrade to a CFL with a Quahog endorsement. Holders of CFLs with a Quahog endorsement, who have been actively fishing their license for two years, may upgrade to a PEL with a Quahog endorsement Holders of PELs or CFLs with Quahog and/or Soft Shell Clam endorsements, who have been actively fishing their licenses, may obtain a Whelk endorsement
  16. 16. Availability of New Shellfish Licenses License Category Regulatory Standard CFL Quahog 2:1 exit/entry ratio, applied to all MPLs + PELs w/QH that are retired Soft Shell Clam 5:1 exit/entry ratio, applied to all MPLs + PELs w/SSC + CFLs w/SSC that are retired Whelk No new endorsements available Shellfish Other Open Student Shellfish Open 65 & Over Shellfish Open
  17. 17. Priority Status for New License Applicants • New licenses (CFLs w/ Quahog, CFLs w/Soft Shell Clam) are issued to applicants in accordance with their priority status. • Top priority is afforded equally to each of the following three groups: 1. Holders of CFLs who have been actively fishing in the shellfish fishery 2. Crew members who have been actively participating in the shellfish fishery. 3. Holders of PELs who have been actively fishing in any fishery.
  18. 18. A/P – 2 yrs Process for Entering and Advancing within the Commercial Fishing Licensing Program A/F – 2 yrs PEL (Other Fishery) CFL (Shellfish) Crew Member (Shellfish) PEL (QH) PEL (QH) CFL (QH) CFL (QH) A/F – 2 yrs A/F – 2 yrs A/F – 2 yrs A/F – 2 yrs Student Shellfish EnterEnterEnter As available via new license opportunities
  19. 19. Additional New License Opportunities • Sale of Business – If you have been actively shellfishing, and if you sell your vessel and gear and retire, the buyer may obtain the same license previously held by the seller. • Family Members or Crew Members – If you have been actively shellfishing and retire, and if a family member or a member of your crew has been actively fishing and/or actively serving as crew, that person may obtain a new shellfish license (CFL w/applicable endorsements)
  20. 20. Status & Trends
  21. 21. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 Licenses (No MPL) Meat Weight (MT) Unemployment Rate Licenses and Landings - Quahogs * NMFS Landings Data
  22. 22. License Type Endorsements Number MPL N/A 853 PEL Quahog 398 SS Clam 256 Whelk 146 SF Other 225 CFL Quahog 158 SS Clam 174 Whelk 109 SF Other 171 Student *Quahog only 49 Over 65 *Quahog only 240 TOTAL 1698 Shellfish Licensing Totals - 2012
  23. 23. Issuance of New Quahog Licenses 2005- 2013 Year Exit/Entry Formula Number Retired New Licenses Issued 2005 3:1 PEL w/QH 148 49 2006 3:1 PEL w/QH 143 43 2007 3:1 PEL w/QH 46 13 2008 3:1 PEL w/QH 49 16 2009 3:1 PEL w/QH 39 13 2010 3:1 PEL w/QH + MPL 48 16 2011 2:1 PEL w/QH + MPL 50 25 2012 2:1 PEL w/QH + MPL 54 27 2013 2:1 PEL w/QH + MPL 46 23 TOTALS -623 +225
  24. 24. Licenses Retired, New Quahog Licenses Issued 2003 - 2013 License Type 2003 Total 2013 Total Net Change MPL 1191 829 -362 PEL w/QH 924 376 -548 CFL w/QH 271 420 +149 Student SF 107 48 -59 65 & ↑ SF 50 268 +218 TOTALS 2,543 1,941 -602
  25. 25. Total Number of Licenses for Quahogs- Grouped by License Type
  26. 26. 2012 Quahogger Activity- Grouped by License Type License Type Total Licenses Active % Active Avg # of Days Fished Avg Quahogs per Day Full Harvest PEL 398 204 51% 70 1055 MPURP 853 217 25% 67 1000 Limited Harvest CFL 158 79 50% 46 837 Student 49 15 31% 29 820 Over 65 240 19 8% 17 606
  27. 27. Number of Active Licenses for Quahogs- Grouped by License Type
  28. 28. 22% # of Days Fished by Active Quahoggers - Grouped by License Type
  29. 29. 93 fishers under 40 years old
  30. 30. Only 19 under 40 full-time (100+ days)
  31. 31. ‘12-‘13‘08-‘11’03-‘07 Non- Quahog Shellfish Other Shellfish Other Whelk Soft Shell Clam Soft Shell Clam Other Endorsements – PEL & CFL
  32. 32. License Fee Revenues
  33. 33. Management & Policy Issues • Balancing access to new license opportunities with maintenance of sustainable fisheries, both in terms of the health of the resources and the economic viability of the existing industry. – We need to make the best use of the shellfish resources that are available to us. • Includes affording an optimal level of access to the resources, for purposes of harvesting them, commercially and recreationally. • Optimal level is some number of fishermen, extracting the resource at some rate. • We now look to you – i.e., all stakeholders – to help us determine what that number should be.

×