Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
The curse of knowledge
Knowing stuff makes it hard to imagine what it’s like not to know stuff
Participants in this experiment were assigned to the
role of either ‘tapper’ or ‘listener’
Tappers were presented with a l...
‘Tapper’
I’ll go for ‘Happy
Birthday to You’
Which song
would you like?
The listener’s role was to guess the title of
the song being tapped
‘Listener’
Um…
Before the listeners guessed the name of the song,
tappers were asked to predict the chances of the
listener guessing corr...
I think there’s a 50%
chance he’ll get it right
It’s
pretty obvious
isn’t it?!
‘Bohemian Rhapsody?!’
The listener’s role is difficult – they guessed the
correct song only 2.5% of the time
But the tappers predicted the liste...
The tappers couldn’t believe how hard the listeners
found it to pick up the tune – they could easily hear it in
their own ...
Conclusions
1. Tappers were suffering from the Curse of Knowledge – once
we know something it is hard for us to imagine wh...
Reference
Overconfidence in the Communication of Intent: Heard and Unheard Melodies
Ph.D. Diss., Stanford University, 1990...
You’ve finished this document.
Download and read it offline.
Upcoming SlideShare
The curse of knowledge
Next
Upcoming SlideShare
The curse of knowledge
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

2

Share

The curse of knowledge

Download to read offline

Knowing stuff makes it hard to imagine what it's like not to know stuff. In 1990 Elizabeth Newton carried out an experiment assigning participants to the role of either 'tapper' or 'listener'. Tappers had to tap out a tune and predict the likelihood of the listener guessing the tune correctly. Tappers were much more confident that listeners would guess correctly than was actually the case.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

The curse of knowledge

  1. 1. The curse of knowledge Knowing stuff makes it hard to imagine what it’s like not to know stuff
  2. 2. Participants in this experiment were assigned to the role of either ‘tapper’ or ‘listener’ Tappers were presented with a list of 25 well known songs and asked to pick a song and tap out its rhythm to a listener
  3. 3. ‘Tapper’ I’ll go for ‘Happy Birthday to You’ Which song would you like?
  4. 4. The listener’s role was to guess the title of the song being tapped
  5. 5. ‘Listener’ Um…
  6. 6. Before the listeners guessed the name of the song, tappers were asked to predict the chances of the listener guessing correctly
  7. 7. I think there’s a 50% chance he’ll get it right It’s pretty obvious isn’t it?!
  8. 8. ‘Bohemian Rhapsody?!’
  9. 9. The listener’s role is difficult – they guessed the correct song only 2.5% of the time But the tappers predicted the listeners would get it right 50% of the time
  10. 10. The tappers couldn’t believe how hard the listeners found it to pick up the tune – they could easily hear it in their own heads It is impossible for tappers to ‘un-know’ the song and therefore very hard for them to imagine what it’s like to be a listener that can only hear the taps
  11. 11. Conclusions 1. Tappers were suffering from the Curse of Knowledge – once we know something it is hard for us to imagine what it is like not to know it 2. In this state we find it difficult to share our knowledge as it’s hard to re-create our listeners state of mind for ourselves
  12. 12. Reference Overconfidence in the Communication of Intent: Heard and Unheard Melodies Ph.D. Diss., Stanford University, 1990 Elizabeth Newton
  • meet8530

    Mar. 12, 2019
  • BhavikaAhuja2

    Oct. 12, 2018

Knowing stuff makes it hard to imagine what it's like not to know stuff. In 1990 Elizabeth Newton carried out an experiment assigning participants to the role of either 'tapper' or 'listener'. Tappers had to tap out a tune and predict the likelihood of the listener guessing the tune correctly. Tappers were much more confident that listeners would guess correctly than was actually the case.

Views

Total views

697

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

87

Actions

Downloads

19

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

2

×