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The Binary Number System<br />Peter Crawley<br />
Don’t worry, by the end of class this will make sense.<br />
Our number system<br />We operate on a base 10 number system (we don’t often refer to it as this because we use it all the...
Counting<br />When we count from zero to 9 we can use our numerals<br />To go past 9 we need to begin combining our number...
The Binary System<br />The prefix bi means two (bicycle, bifold, etc.)<br />The binary system has two numerals (0 and 1)<b...
The Binary System<br />So the next number would be 10, or one two and zero ones (2 in our system)<br />Remember the saying...
Placeholders <br />In our system the places go up by multiplying by tens<br />You have your ones place, your tens place (1...
Writing Numbers in the Binary System<br />Try writing the following numbers in binary<br />5<br />101 (1 four, 0 twos, and...
Writing Binary Numbers in Base 10<br />1010<br />10 (1 eight, 0 fours, 1 twos, 0 ones)<br />101101<br />45 (1 thirty two, ...
Uses of the Binary Number System<br />Binary is used in computers and most programmable machines<br />Electrical circuits ...
Computers<br />What you see on your computer is really billions of pieces of information encoded in the binary number syst...
References<br />http://www.xenvideo.com/category/interesting/page/2/<br />http://www.zazzle.com/binary_poster-228033932120...
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Pete Crawley's Binary Numbers Presentation

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Pete Crawley's Binary Numbers Presentation

  1. 1. The Binary Number System<br />Peter Crawley<br />
  2. 2. Don’t worry, by the end of class this will make sense.<br />
  3. 3. Our number system<br />We operate on a base 10 number system (we don’t often refer to it as this because we use it all the time.<br />We have ten single digit numbers available to us<br />0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9<br />We can write all numbers in using a combination of these numerals<br />
  4. 4. Counting<br />When we count from zero to 9 we can use our numerals<br />To go past 9 we need to begin combining our numbers<br />1 represents the number of tens we have<br />0 represents the number of ones we have<br />The result is 10<br />We go through our numerals until we need another ten, so we change the 1 to a 2 and reset the ones to 0 to get 20<br />This pattern continues until we need a new digit (the hundreds)<br />Think of 100 as one hundreds unit, zero tens unit and zero ones unit<br />
  5. 5. The Binary System<br />The prefix bi means two (bicycle, bifold, etc.)<br />The binary system has two numerals (0 and 1)<br />The system works the same way as the base 10<br />0 means zero ones<br />1 means one one<br />We are now out of digits so we must add a new place, just like we added a new column for the tens, we now must add one for the twos (since there is no 2 in the system)<br />
  6. 6. The Binary System<br />So the next number would be 10, or one two and zero ones (2 in our system)<br />Remember the saying “there are only 10 types of people in the world?”<br />The next would be 11, or one two and one ones (3 in our system)<br />We now must add a new place holder for the next number (the fours) and reset the others<br />100 would be 4 in our system (one four, zero twos and zero ones) <br />
  7. 7. Placeholders <br />In our system the places go up by multiplying by tens<br />You have your ones place, your tens place (1x10), your hundreds place (10x10), your thousands place (100x10),…)<br />In the binary system, the places go up by multiplying by 2<br />You still start with your ones place, then you have your twos place (2x1), your fours place (2x2), your eights place (4x2), your sixteens place (8x2)…<br />
  8. 8. Writing Numbers in the Binary System<br />Try writing the following numbers in binary<br />5<br />101 (1 four, 0 twos, and 1 one)<br />23<br />10111 (1 sixteen, 0 eights, 1 four, 1 two, 1 one)<br />153<br />10011001 (1 one hundred twenty eight, 0 sixty fours, 0 thirty twos, 1 sixteen, 1 eight, 0 fours, 0 twos, 1 one)<br />
  9. 9. Writing Binary Numbers in Base 10<br />1010<br />10 (1 eight, 0 fours, 1 twos, 0 ones)<br />101101<br />45 (1 thirty two, 0 sixteens, 1 eight, 1 four, 0 twos, 1 one)<br />1011011<br />91 (1 sixty four, 0 thirty two, 1 sixteen, 1 eight, 0 fours, 1 two, 1 one)<br />
  10. 10. Uses of the Binary Number System<br />Binary is used in computers and most programmable machines<br />Electrical circuits can be switch only to off and an<br />This translates to 1 and 0 in the binary system<br />Different combinations of off and on circuits communicate different things to a computer<br />
  11. 11. Computers<br />What you see on your computer is really billions of pieces of information encoded in the binary number system<br />The computer decodes this information and changes it into the pictures and words you read on your screen<br />
  12. 12. References<br />http://www.xenvideo.com/category/interesting/page/2/<br />http://www.zazzle.com/binary_poster-228033932120532793<br />http://bestuff.com/stuff/there-are-only-10-types-of-people-in-the-world-those-who-understand-binary-and-those-who-dont<br />

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