Building Linkages Between Education Abroad &  Career Service Offices NAFSA, Kansas City:  June 2, 2010
Presenters <ul><li>Dr. Cheryl Matherly </li></ul><ul><li>Associate Dean for Global Education </li></ul><ul><li>University ...
Objectives <ul><li>Demonstrate importance of purposeful career planning at time students decide to study abroad  </li></ul...
Importance of Purposeful Planning  <ul><li>“… education abroad does not inherently endow a career advantage. It’s only per...
The Disconnect  <ul><li>Students do not see linkage between their EA experience & their career goals </li></ul><ul><li>Stu...
The Challenge <ul><li>When students are deciding : build opportunities for students to see connections between EA &  caree...
Research Findings: Academic, Providers & Employers <ul><li>Is there empirical evidence of causal link between EA & impact ...
50-Year IES Alumni Survey <ul><li>Survey of 17,000 program participants from 500 campuses between 1950-1999 </li></ul><ul>...
Employer Perspectives <ul><li>Literature reflects consensus that – </li></ul><ul><li>Business leaders actively engaged in ...
Imperative to Link EA  & Career Advising <ul><li>Students who study abroad show gains in skill sets & competencies valued ...
Why is collaboration a challenge? <ul><li>University reporting structure (provost v. student affairs) </li></ul><ul><li>La...
Krumbolz: Planned Happenstance <ul><li>Career counselors are challenged to recognize unplanned, serendipitous events as bo...
Brown: Wisdom Development <ul><li>self-knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>deep understanding of others </li></ul><ul><li>sagacity...
Career Development Centers <ul><li>Through the CSPD (Center for Student Professional Development), students and alumni can...
<ul><li>Wake Forest University wants students to think differently about how they answer, focusing on what kind of work is...
Best practices <ul><li>Texas A&M University </li></ul><ul><li>University of Michigan </li></ul><ul><li>University of Texas...
Best practices I <ul><li>Returnee workshops to articulate connection between career development and EA </li></ul><ul><li>I...
Best Practices II <ul><li>Shared reporting lines for international areas/functions </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated staff for d...
Selected Publications <ul><li>Education Abroad and its Value in the Job Market: A Bibliography , David Comp, NAFSA Resourc...
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Building Linkages Between Education Abroad &amp; Career Service Offices

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This presentation was made at the May, 2010 conference of NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

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Building Linkages Between Education Abroad &amp; Career Service Offices

  1. 1. Building Linkages Between Education Abroad & Career Service Offices NAFSA, Kansas City: June 2, 2010
  2. 2. Presenters <ul><li>Dr. Cheryl Matherly </li></ul><ul><li>Associate Dean for Global Education </li></ul><ul><li>University of Tulsa Center for Global Education </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Martin Tillman </li></ul><ul><li>Associate Director, Career Services </li></ul><ul><li>Johns Hopkins University </li></ul><ul><li>School of Advanced International Studies </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives <ul><li>Demonstrate importance of purposeful career planning at time students decide to study abroad </li></ul><ul><li>Understand benefits of linking advising process of education abroad [EA] & career service offices </li></ul><ul><li>Review best campus models for building linkages between EA & career service offices </li></ul>
  4. 4. Importance of Purposeful Planning <ul><li>“… education abroad does not inherently endow a career advantage. It’s only perceived as advantageous when the student is able to articulate how she has used that experience to gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities required by the employer…” </li></ul><ul><li>Sheila Curran, IE, Nov-Dec 2007 </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Disconnect <ul><li>Students do not see linkage between their EA experience & their career goals </li></ul><ul><li>Students do not know what skills & competencies are viewed as value-added by employers </li></ul><ul><li>Students are unable to articulate intercultural competencies gained while abroad </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Challenge <ul><li>When students are deciding : build opportunities for students to see connections between EA & career goals </li></ul><ul><li>When students are abroad : build opportunities to describe & analyze impacts of new intercultural competencies </li></ul><ul><li>When students return to campus : build opportunities to re-frame and articulate what they learned </li></ul>
  7. 7. Research Findings: Academic, Providers & Employers <ul><li>Is there empirical evidence of causal link between EA & impact on career direction? </li></ul><ul><li>Survey of 6,000 students – between 2006-2009- from 22 campuses and provider programs-Univ. of Minnesota & Forum on Education Abroad </li></ul><ul><li>Finding: “…shift in educational & career choices; non-pecuniary job choice; refined language & cultural abilities; development of cultural empathy” </li></ul>
  8. 8. 50-Year IES Alumni Survey <ul><li>Survey of 17,000 program participants from 500 campuses between 1950-1999 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Given that study abroad affected career choices of nearly 2/3 of respondents and half of respondents developed careers with global aspects, longitudinal data…clearly indicate effect of study abroad decisions on future career development.” </li></ul><ul><li>Absence of control group allows only for high correlation –not causation- in findings </li></ul>
  9. 9. Employer Perspectives <ul><li>Literature reflects consensus that – </li></ul><ul><li>Business leaders actively engaged in the global economy place high value on attributes among their employees most often found among those who have studied or worked abroad. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Imperative to Link EA & Career Advising <ul><li>Students who study abroad show gains in skill sets & competencies valued by employers such as cross-cultural sensitivity, language acquisition and cultural awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Study abroad impacts career development and career direction years after graduation </li></ul><ul><li>Study abroad creates strong foundation for future employment in international context </li></ul>
  11. 11. Why is collaboration a challenge? <ul><li>University reporting structure (provost v. student affairs) </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of an international plan </li></ul><ul><li>Career counselors don’t consider this an expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Resources stretched </li></ul><ul><li>Ambiguity as to who “owns” international internships or work programs </li></ul><ul><li>Not part of core career services </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult job market is changing CS priorities </li></ul>
  12. 12. Krumbolz: Planned Happenstance <ul><li>Career counselors are challenged to recognize unplanned, serendipitous events as both inevitable and desirable. Clients are encouraged to take intentional action to generate and discover new opportunities for learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Planned happenstance stresses career responsiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>(Adapted from “Planned Happenstance: Constructing Unexpected Career Opportunities,” Mitchell, Levin and Krumboltz, Journal of Counseling and Development , Spring 1999.) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Brown: Wisdom Development <ul><li>self-knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>deep understanding of others </li></ul><ul><li>sagacity </li></ul><ul><li>life knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>life skills </li></ul><ul><li>willingness to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Brown, S. & Greene, J. (2006) “Wisdom development scale: Translationg the conceptual to the concrete.” Journal of College Student Development, 47(1). </li></ul>
  14. 14. Career Development Centers <ul><li>Through the CSPD (Center for Student Professional Development), students and alumni can explore post-graduate planning resources that help them not only understand their own interests and values, but also translate that self-knowledge into sound judgments about their suitability for different industries, fields and graduate or professional school options. They learn to articulate this new knowledge (and the value of their Rice education) in CSPD programs devoted to professional communication, and to leverage and research alumni- and employer-related resources available to identify specific institutions, organizations and companies of interest. (Rice University) </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Wake Forest University wants students to think differently about how they answer, focusing on what kind of work is meaningful to them rather than what pays the most or what others want. To do that, the Winston-Salem, N.C., university is re-imagining its career-development program to help its 4,600 undergraduates figure out who they are and what they want out of life long before they get to commencement. From their first days on campus, students will explore their personal interests and how those might translate into a job. </li></ul><ul><li>This pairing of students' values and their professional paths is a departure from the traditional career-services office, which typically helps students with the mechanics of a job search and introduces them to recruiters. (Some institutions have taken a broader approach to career development in recent years, though not to the extent of Wake Forest.) The plan is part of the university's broader strategic priority to focus on vocational and character development, and the university will put about $5-million behind it. </li></ul><ul><li>Chronicle of Higher Education, May 16, 2010 </li></ul>
  16. 16. Best practices <ul><li>Texas A&M University </li></ul><ul><li>University of Michigan </li></ul><ul><li>University of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>University of Tulsa </li></ul><ul><li>University of San Diego </li></ul>
  17. 17. Best practices I <ul><li>Returnee workshops to articulate connection between career development and EA </li></ul><ul><li>Include information on internship/job searching in study abroad handbook </li></ul><ul><li>Co-sponsored workshops on international careers </li></ul><ul><li>Co-sponsored internship/job fairs </li></ul><ul><li>Web advising tools </li></ul>
  18. 18. Best Practices II <ul><li>Shared reporting lines for international areas/functions </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated staff for development of professional/internship programs </li></ul><ul><li>INGRADA: International Network for Graduate Recruitment and Development Associations </li></ul><ul><li>WIVA: Work, Internship, Volunteer Programs Abroad </li></ul>
  19. 19. Selected Publications <ul><li>Education Abroad and its Value in the Job Market: A Bibliography , David Comp, NAFSA Resource Library, 2004, http://www.nafsa.org/resourcelibrary/default.aspx?id=8796 </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Experiences Abroad: Preparation for a Globalized Workplace , Cheryl Matherly & William Nolting, National Association of Colleges and Employers, Journal, March 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Education Abroad on Career Development , Martin Tillman, NAFSA Resource Library, 2004 http://www.nafsa.org/resourcelibrary/Default.aspx?id=8335 </li></ul><ul><li>Skills Acquired from your International Experience , University of Arkansas, Career Development Center, website, 2010 </li></ul>

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