The school of architecture

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What distinguishes architecture from an engineering discipline? What separates a dull solution from one that expresses simplicity, clarity, grace, and beauty? At those times when functionality isn’t enough to delight the customers, what is that extra non-tangible element that inspires and moves us? The session will offer an alternative perspective into imagineering, designing and creating solutions.

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The school of architecture

  1. 1. If there was a school of IT ARCHITECTURE what would I learn there?
  2. 2. Can there be great craft without ARTISTRY and great art without CRAFTSMANSHIP?
  3. 3. THOUGHTFUL making of things USABLE
  4. 4. Based on not the structure WONDER,
  5. 5. MEMORABLE FORGETTABLE
  6. 6. HISTORY of IT Architecture
  7. 7. Studying history is the shortest path to WISDOM
  8. 8. WISDOM Understanding of patterns and meta-patterns so they can be used in novel ways
  9. 9. D A T A INFORMATION KNOWLEDGE
  10. 10. Architecture is the only property of interest when reviewing ANCIENTapplications or systems
  11. 11. ITARCHEOLOGY The study of composition or functional details about an extinct IT system
  12. 12. Historically, architectural endeavors express the ZEITGEIST(the spirit of an age)
  13. 13. ANCIENT ERA Acceptance of myth- based truths, driven by magic and wizardry
  14. 14. RAW REFINED
  15. 15. CLASSICAL ERA Ruling of order, symmetry, frameworks and reasoning
  16. 16. MEDIEVAL ERA Dominance of religion, dogmas and canons of scripture
  17. 17. RENAISSANCEERA Embracement of art, beauty and crowd- pleasing aesthetics
  18. 18. REAL SIMULATED
  19. 19. MODERN ERA Inclination to relativity and scientific methods of revealing the truth
  20. 20. FOUR LEVELS of understanding and conceptualization
  21. 21. LITERAL Simple or direct understanding of meaning
  22. 22. METAPHORIC Poetic or allegoric understanding of hints
  23. 23. EMOTIONAL MECHANICAL
  24. 24. ETHICAL Comparative and political recognition of contexts
  25. 25. MYSTICAL Revelation of secrets through inspiration
  26. 26. INEXPLICABLE UNDERSTOOD
  27. 27. A proper IT system grows NATURALLY LOGICALLY POETICALLY out of all its conditions
  28. 28. SIMPLICITY CLARITY GRACE
  29. 29. PROCESS of making ARCHITECTURE
  30. 30. Architecture is the TRANSLATION of intent into technology
  31. 31. BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
  32. 32. AESTHETICSCritical reflection on art, culture and nature. Judgments of sentiments and taste.
  33. 33. BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY AESTHETICS
  34. 34. BUSINESS desires the right FUNCTION
  35. 35. TECHNOLOGY seeks the right STRUCTURE
  36. 36. AESTHETICS requires the right APPEARANCE
  37. 37. FUNCTION STRUCTURE APPEARANCE
  38. 38. Business Analyst cares most about FUNCTION
  39. 39. Engineer cares primarily about STRUCTURE
  40. 40. Designer is focused mostly on APPEARANCE
  41. 41. Who cares about the right BALANCE of all three?
  42. 42. Architect does, through architecting PROCESS
  43. 43. Requirements ANALYSIS Technical design
  44. 44. DESIGNconscious effort to create something that is both functional and aesthetically pleasing
  45. 45. All architecture is DESIGNNot all design is architecture
  46. 46. Design all things by considering them in their LARGER CONTEXT
  47. 47. An object in a COMPONENT A component in a SYSTEM A system in an ENTERPRISE An enterprise in an INDUSTRY
  48. 48. Solutions Architect Infrastructure Architect Business Architect Enterprise Architect
  49. 49. T h e m o r e y o u UNDERSTAND something, the less INTERESTING it is.
  50. 50. ARCHITECTS versus ENGINEERS
  51. 51. An engineer knows EVERYTHING about ONE THING
  52. 52. An architect knows SOMETHING about EVERYTHING
  53. 53. Who is asking HOW?And who is asking WHY?
  54. 54. UNEXPECTED HABITUAL
  55. 55. Structural problems are different from problems of EXISTENCE
  56. 56. It is nicer to join THE PIRATES than to join the navy
  57. 57. Who is the main ENEMY of IT Architecture?
  58. 58. Are ENGINEERS the primeval evil as they don’t understand architecture?
  59. 59. NO, WE NEED BOTH! Architects have head in the cloud Engineers keep feet on the ground
  60. 60. ARCHVILLAIN of architecture are stencils, templates, guidanc es and scaffoldings!
  61. 61. Stencils and templates PREVENT mistakes and disasters, and lower the risk of failure
  62. 62. But what they assure in its place is MEDIOCRITY
  63. 63. It is not just what you don’t know that HURTS YOU It is what you know that JUST AIN’T SO.
  64. 64. Stencils and templates spare you from THINKING
  65. 65. Templates are not evil, they are just frequently MISUSED resulting in mediocre solutions
  66. 66. RISKY SAFE
  67. 67. The problem isnot that we AIM TOO HIGH and fail, but that we aim too low and S U C C E E D
  68. 68. Multiplicity of possibilities can drag the uneducated into COMPLEXITY
  69. 69. Trying to solve every problem results in GENERIC solutions that solve no problems at all
  70. 70. The key is in SIMPLICITY and SPECIFICITY
  71. 71. SIMPLE COMPLICATED
  72. 72. STRATEGY Seriously, why would architects care about it?
  73. 73. Without a strategy, ARCHITECTURE can take you there.
  74. 74. STRATEGY is profoundly different from TACTICS
  75. 75. Tactical questions: HOW? Strategic questions: WHY?
  76. 76. HOW does it work? HOW is it implemented? HOW do I put it apart?
  77. 77. WHY is this needed? WHY do they want it? WHY are they satisfied?
  78. 78. BALANCE Functional Requirements Quality Attributes vs.
  79. 79. Quality Attributes Performance Scalability Reliability Auditability Manageability Interoperability Extensibility Reusability Usability Accessibility Security Recoverability Portability Testability
  80. 80. ADAPTABILITY BUILDABILITY UNDERSTANDABILITY
  81. 81. WHOcan become an ARCHITECT?
  82. 82. Wrong question! Rather ask what are the KEY SKILLS of a good architect?
  83. 83. H o w i m p o r t a n t i s ABSTRACT THINKING for good architecture?
  84. 84. Dealing with AMBIGUITY Lack of information, change of direction, weak strategy
  85. 85. Ability to COMMUNICATE Listen, Argue, Rephrase, Propo se, Bargain, Agree
  86. 86. DEMOCRATIC AUTHORITATIAN
  87. 87. PERSONALITY of an architect
  88. 88. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Attitudes FUNCTIONS Lifestyle
  89. 89. MBTI Functions Sensing – iNtuition Thinking - Feeling
  90. 90. INTUITION Ability to acquire knowledge without the inference of the use of reason.
  91. 91. LOGIC isusedtoprovesomethingexisting INTUITION isusedtodiscoversomethingnew
  92. 92. RADICAL CONSERVATIVE
  93. 93. THINKING Ability to MODEL the world according to objectives, plans, ends and
  94. 94. EMOTION leads to action. REASON leads to conclusions.
  95. 95. The Sixteen MBTI types ISTJ 11.6% ISTP 5.4% ESTP 4.3% ESTJ 8.7% ISFJ 13.8% ISFP 8.8% ESFP 8.5% ESFJ 12.3% INFJ 1.5% INFP 4.3% ENFP 8.1% ENFJ 2.4% INTJ 2.1% INTP 3.3% ENTP 3.2% ENTJ 1.8%
  96. 96. Intuitive Thinkers ISTJ 11.6% ISTP 5.4% ESTP 4.3% ESTJ 8.7% ISFJ 13.8% ISFP 8.8% ESFP 8.5% ESFJ 12.3% INFJ 1.5% INFP 4.3% ENFP 8.1% ENFJ 2.4% INTJ 2.1% INTP 3.3% ENTP 3.2% ENTJ 1.8%
  97. 97. Intuitive Thinkers: of population
  98. 98. One in ten people has a POTENTIAL to become an IT architect
  99. 99. YOU DISAGREE? That’s ok. MBTI is just a model.
  100. 100. All models are FLAWED but some models are USEFUL
  101. 101. ARCHITECTS MODELS do IT with

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