Immaginate...uno sguardo sul futuro

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  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. The vision and concept have existed for years; however, there has been an acceleration in the number and types of things that are being connected and in the technologies for identifying, sensing and communicating. This leads to the important trend of imbuing IT tools and practices into operational technology (OT), plus value can be gained when these newly smart and connected objects can be linked to traditional IT systems to inject purchases and other business transactions. They can also use this link to receive updated behavioral orders, adjusting the way those OT objects act to the situation and the objectives determined by the business strategy and IT systems. Key elements of the IoT include:\nEmbedded sensors: Sensors that detect and communicate changes (e.g., accelerometers, GPS, compasses, cameras) are being embedded not just in mobile devices but in an increasing number of places and objects. \nImage recognition: Image recognition technologies strive to identify objects, people, buildings, places, logos and anything else that has value to consumers and enterprises. Smartphones and tablets equipped with cameras have pushed this technology from mainly industrial applications to broad consumer and enterprise applications.\nNFC payment: NFC allows users to make payments by waving their mobile phone in front of a compatible reader. Once NFC is embedded in a critical mass of phones for payment, industries such as public transportation, airlines, retail and healthcare can explore other areas in which NFC technology can improve efficiency and customer service.\n
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  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
  • Big data has such a vast size that it exceeds the capacity of traditional data management technologies; it requires the use of new or exotic technologies simply to manage the volume alone. But processing matters, too. A complex statistical model can make a 300 GB database seem bigger than a 110 TB database, even if both are running on multicore, distributed parallel processing platforms. Big data has quickly emerged as a significant challenge for IT leaders. The term only became popular in 2009. By February 2011, a Google search on "big data" yielded 2.9 million hits, and vendors now advertise their products as solutions to the big data challenge. Inquiries about big data from Gartner clients have risen sharply as well. \nMany new technologies are emerging, with the potential to be disruptive (e.g., in-memory DBMS), while others are hyped in the market and, although interesting, add no real value to the market (e.g., noSQL). Many new vendors are also emerging with this technology (see "Cool Vendors in Data Management and Integration, 2011" [G00211777]).\nIn addition to these, other new forces are coming into play. Analytics has become a major driving application for DW, with in-DBMS analytics (as delivered by Teradata and SAS, as well as others), use of MapReduce outside and inside the DBMS, and the use of self-service data marts, implemented in EMC/Greenplum and Teradata as a private cloud for internal implementation. \n
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  • Immaginate...uno sguardo sul futuro

    1. 1. Gorizia24 maggio 2012 Immaginate... Michele Vianello Direttore del VEGA
    2. 2. Sono il Direttore Generale del VEGA (Il Parco Scientifico e Tecnologico di Venezia). Mi sono occupato e mi occupo di WEB e di Social Media, di Città Intelligenti.Mi trovate su Facebook, su Twitter, su Linkedin ecc. ecc.Se volete seguirmi, leggete il mio blog: http://www.michelecamp.it p.s. sono considerato uno “starnutitore” v. Seth Godinvediamo se funziona anche con voi....
    3. 3. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    4. 4. Un mondo interamente connesso Immaginate Un’immensa nuvola di dati Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    5. 5. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    6. 6. Persone che condividono conoscenze Immaginate Oggetti che comunicano Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    7. 7. E’ l’epoca ... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    8. 8. Cloud computing E’ l’epoca ... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    9. 9. Cloud computing E’ l’epoca ... Connettività in movimento Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    10. 10. Cloud computing Social Network E’ l’epoca ... e Crowdsourcing Connettività in movimento Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    11. 11. Cloud computing Social Internet Network E’ l’epoca ... of e Things Crowdsourcing Connettività in movimento Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    12. 12. Cloud computing Social Internet Network E’ l’epoca ... of e Things Crowdsourcing Connettività in movimento The Big DATA Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    13. 13. slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    14. 14. slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    15. 15. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    16. 16. Nel 2015...... 3 miliardi di smarphone 294 milioni di tablet Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    17. 17. I tablet sono una “killer application”, fanno si che “il WEB sia sempre con noi” Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    18. 18. Cloud Computing Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    19. 19. SERVIZIO Cloud Computing Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    20. 20. SERVIZIO Cloud Scalabilità Computing e flessibilità Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    21. 21. SERVIZIO Cloud Scalabilità Computing e flessibilità INTERNET Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    22. 22. Cloud Computing Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    23. 23. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    24. 24. “Le nostre Città si stanno trasformando velocemente in ecosistemi artificiali composti da organismi digitali interdipendenti e interconnessi.” William J.Mitchell (MIT) Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    25. 25. Cloud Computing e Tabletgenerano un cambiamento epocale..... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    26. 26. Cloud Computing e Tabletgenerano un cambiamento epocale..... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    27. 27. Cloud Computing e Tabletgenerano un cambiamento epocale..... DECONTESTUALIZZAZIONE Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    28. 28. Cloud Computing Lavoro, e luogo, Tablet orario...generano un cambiamento sono il epocale..... passato DECONTESTUALIZZAZIONE Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    29. 29. COWO WIFIINTERNET CROWDSOURCINGNOMADIC WORKER CLOUD Michele Vianello http://www.michelecamp.it
    30. 30. COWO WIFIINTERNET CROWDSOURCINGNOMADIC WORKER CLOUD Michele Vianello http://www.michelecamp.it
    31. 31. COWO WIFIINTERNET CROWDSOURCING UN MONDO DI LAVORATORINOMADIC WORKER NOMADI CLOUD Michele Vianello http://www.michelecamp.it
    32. 32. “Oltre la demografia” Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    33. 33. “Oltre la demografia” “Nell’era digitale io sono io, non un sottogruppo statistico. Io significa informazioni ed eventi che non hanno alcun alcun valore demografico o statistico” Nicholas Negroponte “I mercati sono fatti di esseri umani, non di segmenti demografici” David Weinberger Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    34. 34. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    35. 35. Ogni anno nel mondo abbiamo a disposizione un trilione di ore da dedicare al tempo libero!!! Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    36. 36. Ogni anno nel mondo abbiamo a disposizione un trilione di ore da dedicare al tempo libero!!! Una persona nata nel 1960, a oggi ha guardato circa 50.000 ore di televisione. Prima di morire ne guarderà altre 30.000. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    37. 37. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    38. 38. Sempre di più prosumer -meno media tradizionali +Interazione Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it web
    39. 39. TOP SITES Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it alexa.com
    40. 40. TOP SITES Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it alexa.com
    41. 41. TOP SITES interazione dialogo un mondo social Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it alexa.com
    42. 42. “SURPLUS COGNITIVO” Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    43. 43. “SURPLUS COGNITIVO” Ognuno di noi, collabora, produce, dialoga, condivide, regala, genera reddito e ricchezza. Vale per gli esseri umani vale, sempre di più, per le imprese!!!! Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    44. 44. CROWDSOURCING Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    45. 45. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    46. 46. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    47. 47. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    48. 48. “Quando dici collaborazione, il quaranticinquenne medio pensa di sapere ciò di cui stai parlando -un team che si siede attorno a un tavolo e conduce una bella conversazione, con qualche bell’obiettivo e un bell’atteggiamento. ...oggi la collaborazione corrisponde a un approccio profondamente nuovo all’orchestrazione della capacità di innovare, creare prodotti/servizi e risolvere problemi. Il social networking sta diventando social production, una produzione sociale in base a cui gruppi paritari autorganizzati possono progettare e produrre di tutto, dal software alle motociclette.” Eric Schmidt CEO di Google Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    49. 49. DOMANDA: QUALE E’ LA PIU’IMPORTANTE PIATTAFORMA DI CROWDSOURCING ESISTENTE AL MONDO??? slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    50. 50. Wikipedia = 3,5 milioni di articoli; 380 milioni di lettori; 25 edizioni in lingue diverse; 78 milioni di visitatori al mese; VI° sito più visitato al mondo. 100.000 collaboratori volontari 1800 amministratori volontari. Jimmi Wales: “E’ volontariato allo stato puro entusiasta e disinteressato.” slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    51. 51. slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it http://ushahidi.com/
    52. 52. slide di Michele Vianello https://italycrowdsourcing.crowdmap.com/ Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    53. 53. slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    54. 54. http://www.innocentive.com/ slide di Michele Vianello Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    55. 55. Michele Vianello slide di Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    56. 56. http://www.raccoltadifferenziata.name/ Michele Vianello slide di Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    57. 57. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    58. 58. http://www.architizer.com/en_us/ Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    59. 59. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it slide di Michele Vianello
    60. 60. Ricordiamo: abbiamo parlato di“piattaforme” e non di “portali” o di “siti internet”. Il CROWDSOURCING presuppone una cultura del “dialogo”, dello “scambio” e tanta “bidirezionalità”. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it slide di Michele Vianello
    61. 61. IL MONDO DEGLI OGGETTI PARLANTI Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    62. 62. The Internet of Things Leads to the Internetof Everything
    63. 63. The Internet of Things Leads to the Internetof Everything Over 50% of Internet connections are things 2011: 15+ billion permanent, 50+ billion intermittent 2020: 30+ billion permanent, >200 billion intermittent
    64. 64. The Internet of Things Leads to the Internet of Everything Over 50% of Internet connections are thingsRemote sensing of objects 2011: 15+ billion permanent, 50+ billion intermittentand environment 2020: 30+ billion permanent, >200 billion intermittent Cameras and microphones widely deployed Everything has a URL
    65. 65. The Internet of Things Leads to the Internet of Everything Over 50% of Internet connections are thingsRemote sensing of objects 2011: 15+ billion permanent, 50+ billion intermittentand environment 2020: 30+ billion permanent, >200 billion intermittent Audio $0.5 Cameras and microphones widely deployed Everything has a URL 2 GB flash $3 LTE NFC GPRS $7/Wi-Fi $3 7" 800 x 400 display $20
    66. 66. The Internet of Things Leads to the Internet of Everything Over 50% of Internet connections are thingsRemote sensing of objects 2011: 15+ billion permanent, 50+ billion intermittentand environment 2020: 30+ billion permanent, >200 billion intermittent Building and New routes to infrastructure market via Audio $0.5 management intelligent objects Cameras and microphones widely deployed Everything has a URL 2 GB flash $3 Content and services via connected products Augmented Situational decision reality support LTE NFC GPRS $7/Wi-Fi $3 7" 800 x 400 display $20
    67. 67. “Internet of things" permette agli oggetti di comunicare tra di loro attraverso il web. Ma, non dimentichiamolo mai, non è il frigorifero che fa la spesa. Dietro a una lampadina ci sta sempre un uomo che l’accende. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    68. 68. The Big DATA Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    69. 69. Produciamo una grande quantità di dati.... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    70. 70. ... ma i dati sono valore.... Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    71. 71. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data
    72. 72. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data Mobile and Communications
    73. 73. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data RFID, Meters and Other OT Mobile and Communications
    74. 74. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Mobile and Communications
    75. 75. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Internal Applications, Mobile and Email, More Communications
    76. 76. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Social Computing Internal Applications, Mobile and Email, More Communications
    77. 77. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Social Computing B2B Internal Applications, Mobile and Email, More Communications
    78. 78. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Cloud Computing and Cloud Data Social Computing B2B Internal Applications, Mobile and Email, More Communications
    79. 79. Big Data ... Fast Data … All Data ball and ey, base ying hock ns. I like pla mountai ica climbing rth Amer ations in No surpassed and nt civiliz playing hockey, baseball thatThe ancie eeIring marvels they invented gin like had en becaus climbing e mouney also tains. d Greece ye s eelier. Th prove ica Rome anThe ancient ar I like play in North Amer out 700 civilizationsing hock " to im the "0" ab engineerinmean eering. surpabaseball and en g marvels that ey, ssed had "gold eir engin bing red the clim ted discove y aspect ofGreece because they inven s. th mountain rk in New Yo They also ever Rome andThe ancient civilizati. n abou the "0" ally t ented inv700 years eelier ons in Nort t America s actu had engibuen ing marto improveh America Pizza wa n food neer means vels g." RFID, Meters discovered thee"gold hettiengineerinthat surpassed not ItaliaRom spag wa everythe "0"and Gree city. It isNot only that, t of their ce because they inve aspec food. abou. ted in s in Chinat 700 yearNew YorkThey nted Pizza was actually inven inventedovered the "gol disc earlier. also Documents American every aspect but etti den mean" city. It is not Italian food of their was to improve Not only that, spagh food.Pizza engineering. was actuChina. in ally invented in invented and Other OT city. It is not Italia New York food. Not only that n food but Ame rican , spaghetti was invented in Chin and Content a. Cloud Computing and Cloud Data Social Computing B2B Internal Applications, Mobile and Email, More Communications Can easily overwhelm in-house resources
    80. 80. La conoscenza diventa “sociale” Verso la “città intelligente” Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    81. 81. Michele Vianellohttp://www.michelecamp.it
    82. 82. social network BIT!!!! gioco CONOSCENZA BIT!!!!attività istituzionali attività lavorative Michele Vianello http://www.michelecamp.it
    83. 83. Naturalmente mi interessano le vostre idee, i vostrisuggerimenti, le vostre critiche. Scrivetemi sul blog, su Facebook, su il mio blog: http://www.michelecamp.it Twitter..... michele.vianello0@aliceeposta.it sono facilmente michele.vianello@vegapark.ve.it reperibile in rete!!!!
    84. 84. Naturalmente mi interessano le vostre idee, i vostrisuggerimenti, le vostre critiche. Scrivetemi sul blog, su Facebook, su il mio blog: http://www.michelecamp.it Twitter..... michele.vianello0@aliceeposta.it sono facilmente michele.vianello@vegapark.ve.it reperibile in rete!!!! Grazie per l’attenzione

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