Show Me Conference, 2009

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Show Me Conference, 2009

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  • Educational change depends on what teachers do and think - it is as simple and complex as that. The conditions for teaching appear to have deteriorated - stress and alienation and the intensification of teacher's work, is at an all time high. Teachers look first to other teachers in such times for sources of help and their greatest rewards come from, those moments when they feel their students have learnt something, and from respect from their fellow teachers. Too often teachers work in isolation increasingly feeling frustrated and burnt-out with imposed curriculum and accountability demands. Change is needed to develop schools as Learning Communities. Collegiality provides the best starting point in the process of teacher regeneration. 'Moving' or 'learning enriched' schools are what Fullan calls 'professional learning communities'. Teaching needs to be seen as a collective rather than an individual enterprise. This is the reason why it means it is easier to teach in some schools than others. Successful schools enforce, through moral obligations, consistent standards and they are more likely to trust and value others and ask for and share expertise. This is what makes such schools more easy to teach, and learn to teach better in, than others. Teachers in such schools are less likely to uncritically conform to imposed ideas. They have developed the capacity to self reflect, to examine student performance and act on their own understandings. Effective teachers, Fullan states. account for 30% of the variance of student progress. There are three areas of importance to be effective: teaching skills; classroom climate; and professional characteristics such as, holding high expectations, a passion for improving, holding people accountable and team work. Real pupil improvement Fullan states comes from the 'power' of having 'three good teachers in a row'. To achieve such change requires reculturing the teaching profession as Fullan believes that there are few schools that currently could be called true learning communities.
  • Educational change depends on what teachers do and think - it is as simple and complex as that. The conditions for teaching appear to have deteriorated - stress and alienation and the intensification of teacher's work, is at an all time high. Teachers look first to other teachers in such times for sources of help and their greatest rewards come from, those moments when they feel their students have learnt something, and from respect from their fellow teachers. Too often teachers work in isolation increasingly feeling frustrated and burnt-out with imposed curriculum and accountability demands. Change is needed to develop schools as Learning Communities. Collegiality provides the best starting point in the process of teacher regeneration. 'Moving' or 'learning enriched' schools are what Fullan calls 'professional learning communities'. Teaching needs to be seen as a collective rather than an individual enterprise. This is the reason why it means it is easier to teach in some schools than others. Successful schools enforce, through moral obligations, consistent standards and they are more likely to trust and value others and ask for and share expertise. This is what makes such schools more easy to teach, and learn to teach better in, than others. Teachers in such schools are less likely to uncritically conform to imposed ideas. They have developed the capacity to self reflect, to examine student performance and act on their own understandings. Effective teachers, Fullan states. account for 30% of the variance of student progress. There are three areas of importance to be effective: teaching skills; classroom climate; and professional characteristics such as, holding high expectations, a passion for improving, holding people accountable and team work. Real pupil improvement Fullan states comes from the 'power' of having 'three good teachers in a row'. To achieve such change requires reculturing the teaching profession as Fullan believes that there are few schools that currently could be called true learning communities.
  • Educational change depends on what teachers do and think - it is as simple and complex as that. The conditions for teaching appear to have deteriorated - stress and alienation and the intensification of teacher's work, is at an all time high. Teachers look first to other teachers in such times for sources of help and their greatest rewards come from, those moments when they feel their students have learnt something, and from respect from their fellow teachers. Too often teachers work in isolation increasingly feeling frustrated and burnt-out with imposed curriculum and accountability demands. Change is needed to develop schools as Learning Communities. Collegiality provides the best starting point in the process of teacher regeneration. 'Moving' or 'learning enriched' schools are what Fullan calls 'professional learning communities'. Teaching needs to be seen as a collective rather than an individual enterprise. This is the reason why it means it is easier to teach in some schools than others. Successful schools enforce, through moral obligations, consistent standards and they are more likely to trust and value others and ask for and share expertise. This is what makes such schools more easy to teach, and learn to teach better in, than others. Teachers in such schools are less likely to uncritically conform to imposed ideas. They have developed the capacity to self reflect, to examine student performance and act on their own understandings. Effective teachers, Fullan states. account for 30% of the variance of student progress. There are three areas of importance to be effective: teaching skills; classroom climate; and professional characteristics such as, holding high expectations, a passion for improving, holding people accountable and team work. Real pupil improvement Fullan states comes from the 'power' of having 'three good teachers in a row'. To achieve such change requires reculturing the teaching profession as Fullan believes that there are few schools that currently could be called true learning communities.
  • Educational change depends on what teachers do and think - it is as simple and complex as that. The conditions for teaching appear to have deteriorated - stress and alienation and the intensification of teacher's work, is at an all time high. Teachers look first to other teachers in such times for sources of help and their greatest rewards come from, those moments when they feel their students have learnt something, and from respect from their fellow teachers. Too often teachers work in isolation increasingly feeling frustrated and burnt-out with imposed curriculum and accountability demands. Change is needed to develop schools as Learning Communities. Collegiality provides the best starting point in the process of teacher regeneration. 'Moving' or 'learning enriched' schools are what Fullan calls 'professional learning communities'. Teaching needs to be seen as a collective rather than an individual enterprise. This is the reason why it means it is easier to teach in some schools than others. Successful schools enforce, through moral obligations, consistent standards and they are more likely to trust and value others and ask for and share expertise. This is what makes such schools more easy to teach, and learn to teach better in, than others. Teachers in such schools are less likely to uncritically conform to imposed ideas. They have developed the capacity to self reflect, to examine student performance and act on their own understandings. Effective teachers, Fullan states. account for 30% of the variance of student progress. There are three areas of importance to be effective: teaching skills; classroom climate; and professional characteristics such as, holding high expectations, a passion for improving, holding people accountable and team work. Real pupil improvement Fullan states comes from the 'power' of having 'three good teachers in a row'. To achieve such change requires reculturing the teaching profession as Fullan believes that there are few schools that currently could be called true learning communities.
  • Educational change depends on what teachers do and think - it is as simple and complex as that. The conditions for teaching appear to have deteriorated - stress and alienation and the intensification of teacher's work, is at an all time high. Teachers look first to other teachers in such times for sources of help and their greatest rewards come from, those moments when they feel their students have learnt something, and from respect from their fellow teachers. Too often teachers work in isolation increasingly feeling frustrated and burnt-out with imposed curriculum and accountability demands. Change is needed to develop schools as Learning Communities. Collegiality provides the best starting point in the process of teacher regeneration. 'Moving' or 'learning enriched' schools are what Fullan calls 'professional learning communities'. Teaching needs to be seen as a collective rather than an individual enterprise. This is the reason why it means it is easier to teach in some schools than others. Successful schools enforce, through moral obligations, consistent standards and they are more likely to trust and value others and ask for and share expertise. This is what makes such schools more easy to teach, and learn to teach better in, than others. Teachers in such schools are less likely to uncritically conform to imposed ideas. They have developed the capacity to self reflect, to examine student performance and act on their own understandings. Effective teachers, Fullan states. account for 30% of the variance of student progress. There are three areas of importance to be effective: teaching skills; classroom climate; and professional characteristics such as, holding high expectations, a passion for improving, holding people accountable and team work. Real pupil improvement Fullan states comes from the 'power' of having 'three good teachers in a row'. To achieve such change requires reculturing the teaching profession as Fullan believes that there are few schools that currently could be called true learning communities.
  • Posted by my computer that way as I feel tension, ambiguity and a need for self-reflection, I can feel like things are actually moving forward rather than losing ground
  • Show Me Conference, 2009

    1. 1. Teacher Leader Academy Best Practices in Responsive Teaching Differentiated Instruction Building a Systemic & Sustainable Professional Development From the Ground Up Sarah Booth Riss Merlene Gilb Tom Havrilka Webster Groves School District Show-Me Conference March, 2009
    2. 2. <ul><li>On a note card at your table write in the following order: </li></ul><ul><li>Something that is true about you and a large group of people in this room. (I live in Missouri.) </li></ul><ul><li>Something that is true about you and about 25% of the people in this room. (I have a cat.) </li></ul><ul><li>Something that is true about you and about 10% of the people in this room. (I Zumba.) </li></ul><ul><li>Something that is true only about you. (I . . . ) </li></ul>WHO IS IT?
    3. 3. LINE UP
    4. 4. KNOW <ul><li>Phases, underpinnings, and resources that support a capacity building professional development model for implementing differentiation. </li></ul>
    5. 5. DO <ul><li>Determine “first steps” in designing and supporting a differentiation initiative. </li></ul>
    6. 6. UNDERSTAND <ul><li>Cultivating and nurturing teachers as leaders is critical in the implementation of differentiation for lasting change. </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation is a journey – a process over time that requires years of commitment to become and integral part of a school or district culture. </li></ul>
    7. 7. ESSENTIAL QUESTION <ul><li>How can school leaders implement the principles of differentiation in a school or district system that will make a meaningful difference in the lives of ALL students? </li></ul>
    8. 8. WHO IS IT? “ People in a school community are involved in one another’s lives, and sometimes we forget about the importance of the way they interrelate with one another and how that makes a difference in a way learning takes place. This is about not forgetting the people.” Barbra Schneider Univ. of Chicago “Trusting School Community Linked to Student Gains”
    9. 9. Leading for Change Critical Components <ul><li>Vision . . . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a compelling case for change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Moral Purpose . . . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Acting with the intention of making a positive difference in the lives of EVERY student </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Effective Structures . . . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build an arrangement for improvement; structures (learning in context), roles and role relationships </li></ul></ul>Based on the work of Michael Fullan
    10. 10. <ul><li>Capacity Building . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Seek out, train, and support key leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Lateral Capacity Building . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Connect schools to build a shared sense of identity </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing Learning . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Keep learning as you go and building powerful assessments to guide your work – “slow knowing” </li></ul>Leading for Change Critical Components Based on the work of Michael Fullan
    11. 11. <ul><li>Productive Conflict . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Redefine resistance as a potential positive force </li></ul><ul><li>High Pressure and High Support . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a demanding culture where career is combined with high expectations </li></ul><ul><li>External Partners . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Connect with selective external groups to enhance internal capacity building </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Resources . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Focus financial investments that will eventually pay off politically, morally and through improved performance </li></ul>Based on the work of Michael Fullan Leading for Change Critical Components
    12. 12. FIRST Order Change . . . <ul><li>First-Order Change is incremental. Incremental change fine-tunes the system through a series of small steps that do not depart radically from the past. It is a way to solve problems using our previous repertoire of solutions. It allows teachers to retain current beliefs about teaching and to generally retain current classroom routines and practices. </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23)
    13. 13. SECOND Order Change . . . <ul><li>Second-Order Change is anything but incremental. It involves &quot;dramatic departures from the expected, both in defining a given problem and in finding a solution.&quot; It is also referred to as &quot;deep change&quot; (p. 66). Such change asks teachers to alter beliefs and practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Change toward more effectively differentiated classrooms is Second-Order Change . </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23)
    14. 14. SECOND Order Change . . . <ul><li>Leaders for Second-Order Change understand that the change is dependent on the will and skill of others. They do not see teachers as factory workers. Rather they are respectful of the people whom they ask to invest in the demanding work of change. They are mindful and respectful of the complexity of teachers’ personal lives and professional lives, and they understand the anxiety-producing nature of change. </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23)
    15. 15. SECOND Order Change . . . <ul><li>Leaders for Second-Order Change persist in getting to know teachers, understanding their particular strengths and needs, and listening to their ideas and concerns. They connect with those whom they lead. </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23)
    16. 16. FIRST & SECOND Order Change
    17. 17. The WHY of Leadership <ul><li>Asking . . . </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What is school about? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What do we believe in? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why do we do what we do the way we do it? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How are we unique? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What do we want to become? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What role might each of us play in becoming something better? </li></ul></ul></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23 - 28)
    18. 18. The WHO of Leadership <ul><li>Change is dependent on the will and skill of others </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers are not seen “factory workers (Sarason, 1996) </li></ul><ul><li>Respectful of people who are asked to invest in the demanding work of change </li></ul><ul><li>Mindful and respectful of the complexity of teachers personal lives and professional lives </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the anxiety-producing nature of change </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23 - 28)
    19. 19. The WHO of Leadership <ul><li>Key role of leaders for significant school change is RELATIONSHP BUILDING </li></ul><ul><li>Help others tolerate ambiguity </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciate varied perspectives represented in the group </li></ul><ul><li>Build community even as the group grapples with difficult issues </li></ul><ul><li>Enlist others in common beliefs, shared ideas, shared principles and shared responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Build “distributed leadership” </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23 - 28)
    20. 20. The WHAT of Leadership <ul><li>To move too quickly is intimidating to many people but to move too slowly results in missed opportunity. (Fullan, 2001, Saphier, King, & D’Auria, 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Change requires both pressure and support from leaders. An organization that changes must change beliefs as well as practices. An organization that changes practices without changing beliefs will quickly revert to the old practices. (Fullan, 2001, Evans, 1996, Schlechty, 1997) </li></ul><ul><li>Change necessarily causes ambiguity, tension, and self examination and an absence of mistakes likely indicates an absence of growth. (Fullan, 2001, Hoerr, 2005, Saphier, Kind, & D’Auria, 2006) </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23 - 28)
    21. 21. The HOW of Leadership <ul><li>Stay focused </li></ul><ul><li>Stay the course – Real change takes a LONG time </li></ul><ul><li>Provide intensive, intelligent and sustained support for those asked to implement the change </li></ul><ul><li>Accept that leaders are entrusted with significantly improving conditions for this in their care; and that doing so requires conviction, knowledge, and risk </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the dangers of NOT undertaking change is greater than those of change itself </li></ul>Taken from The Differentiated School (p. 23 - 28)
    22. 23. Why Change? <ul><li>Because we become irrelevant if we do not. It’s as simple (and complex) as that. Where does differentiation fit into the mandate for change? We cannot have high quality schools that effectively develop productive and engaged learners in the absence of responsive classrooms. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s as simple (and complex) as that. </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership for Differentiating Schools & Classrooms – (p. 35) </li></ul>
    23. 24. Michael Fullan &quot;Never a checklist, always complexity. There is no step-by-step shortcut to transformation;”
    24. 25. WHO IS IT? “ People in a school community are involved in one another’s lives, and sometimes we forget about the importance of the way they interrelate with one another and how that makes a difference in a way learning takes place. This is about not forgetting the people.” Barbra Schneider Univ. of Chicago “Trusting School Community Linked to Student Gains”
    25. 26. Teacher Leader Academy – Best Practices in Responsive Teaching (Differentiation) www.webster.k12.mo.us/rtdi
    26. 34. Quiz, Quiz, Trade
    27. 35. Respecting Individuals Owning Student Success Building Community Providing High Quality Curriculum Creating Varied Avenues to Learning Asseing to Inform Instructionj Sharing Responsibility for Teaching and Learning Implementing Flexible Classroom Routines
    28. 36. OUR FIRST STEPS <ul><li>Define DIFFERENTIATION (common language) </li></ul><ul><li>Outline reasons for differentiation to support the school/district mission </li></ul><ul><li>Align initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Develop and present a model for capacity building </li></ul><ul><li>Identify leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Identify stakeholders and share the message </li></ul>
    29. 37. NSDC's Standards for Staff Development QUESTIONS???
    30. 38. WHO IS IT? “ People in a school community are involved in one another’s lives, and sometimes we forget about the importance of the way they interrelate with one another and how that makes a difference in a way learning takes place. This is about not forgetting the people.” Barbra Schneider Univ. of Chicago “Trusting School Community Linked to Student Gains”
    31. 39. CREATING A FRAMEWORK <ul><li>What are you doing currently that supports the implementation of differentiation? </li></ul><ul><li>What are we doing that might restrict the implementation of differentiation? </li></ul>
    32. 40. <ul><li>Principals are instructional leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Support from the superintendent </li></ul><ul><li>Strongly supported mission statement </li></ul><ul><li>Funding is not in place to support the initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Initiatives, priorities are fragmented, not coherent </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation is not one of the elements on the teacher evaluation </li></ul>GOAL – Turn your RESTRAINERS to DRIVERS! DRIVERS RESTRAINERS
    33. 41. GUIDING QUESTIONS <ul><li>Why are we heading down this path? </li></ul><ul><li>What will it look like when we get there? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we expect to accomplish? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we get there? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we have to do? </li></ul>
    34. 43. Anchor Activity
    35. 44. WHO IS IT? “ People in a school community are involved in one another’s lives, and sometimes we forget about the importance of the way they interrelate with one another and how that makes a difference in a way learning takes place. This is about not forgetting the people.” Barbra Schneider Univ. of Chicago “Trusting School Community Linked to Student Gains”
    36. 45. SHARING Give One, Get One
    37. 46. Stay Encouraged . . . <ul><li>To move too quickly is intimidating to many people, but to more too slowly results in missed opportunity. </li></ul><ul><li>Change requires both pressure and support from leaders. An organization that changes must change beliefs as well as practices. An organization that changes practices without changing beliefs will quickly revert to the old practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Change necessarily causes ambiguity, tension and self-examination. An absence of mistakes likely indicates an absence of growth. </li></ul>Research Based Statements from The Differentiated School (p. 26)
    38. 47. Learning from Experiences <ul><li>Top Down </li></ul><ul><li>Too Much, Too Fast </li></ul><ul><li>Expect Change After One Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>Admiring the Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Trying to Fix Everything </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted/Spec. Ed. is the Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Model is Only for Gifted/Special Ed. Students </li></ul><ul><li>Follow the Agenda No Matter What </li></ul><ul><li>Ignore Your Instincts – Fear Taking a Risk </li></ul><ul><li>Establish a Culture of Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Time and Support </li></ul><ul><li>Expect Change Over Time X 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate Successes </li></ul><ul><li>Pinpoint Next Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it a General Ed. Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Weave the Model Into the Life of School/District </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to and Watch Your Learners </li></ul><ul><li>When You See the Signs Act Fast </li></ul>
    39. 48. ADVICE TO LEND <ul><li>Use the chart paper by your table. </li></ul><ul><li>List ONE piece of advice that you learned and will use today in planning for professional development supporting differentiation. </li></ul><ul><li>List ONE question you will ask in your district. </li></ul><ul><li>List ONE lingering thought that you must remember when planning professional development for differentiation. </li></ul><ul><li>As soon as you are complete, take a gallery walk around the room reviewing and commenting on the thoughts of others. </li></ul><ul><li>When the chime sounds, please find your seat. </li></ul>
    40. 49. Helpful Resources . . . <ul><li>Sarah Riss </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Merlene Gilb </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>WGSD Responsive Teaching Website </li></ul><ul><li>www.webster.k12.mo.us </li></ul>
    41. 50. Helpful Resources . . . <ul><li>Books – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leading in a Culture of Change , Michael Fullan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership for Differentiating School and Classroom , Carol Ann Tomlinson & Susan Demirsky Allan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Differentiated School: Making Revolutionary Changes in Teaching and Learning , Carol Ann Tomlinson, Kay Brimijoin, Lane Narvaez </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fulfilling the Promise of the Differentiated Classroom , Carol Ann Tomlinson </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional Development for Differentiating Instruction: An ASCD Action Tool , Cindy A. Strickland </li></ul></ul>

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