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Totallyhistory.com
The Last Supper, 1495-1498
By: Leonardo da Vinci
A fifteenth century mural painting done in Milan by da Vinci, The Last Su...
School of Athens, c. 1510
By: Raphael
The School of Athens (or Scuola di Atene in Italian) was one of Raphael’s
commission...
Mona Lisa, c. 1503-1519
By: Leonardo da Vinci
This painting depicts Lisa del Giocondo whose expression is well-known for
t...
Whistler’s Mother, 1871
By: James McNeill Whistler
Whistler painted his mother, Anna McNeill Whistler, when the original m...
The Starry Night, 1889
By: Vincent van Gogh
Considered to be the best and most famous work of Vincent van
Gogh, The Starry...
The Scream, 1893
By: Edvard Munch
In a series of paintings reproduced with various media known as Scream, Edvard
Munch con...
The Great Wave off Kanagawa, c. 1829-32
By: Katsushika Hokusai
The Great Wave off Kanagawa is a woodblock print that is Ho...
The Son of Man, 1964
By: Rene Magritte
Magritte painted The Son of Man, or Le fils de l’homme, as a self-portrait. The
pai...
Posted by Rick Raule on February 8, 2012 in Arts, Entertainment
No. 5, 1948 (Jackson Pollock)
Pollock’s abstract, almost violently expressionist, style
tends to divide people into two la...
Black Square (Kazimir Malevich)
The Ukraine-born Malevich is credited as the creator
of Suprematism which, to my surprise,...
Composition 8 (Vasily Kandinsky)
Though no one has a definite answer to the question of “What is
art?” many people may agr...
Guernica (Pablo Picasso)
You can’t really see it here, but Picasso’s Guernica is
HUGE, measuring 11×25.6ft . It features h...
The Birth of Venus (Sandro Botticelli)
Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus is beautiful
with the colors and the composition an...
Saturn Devouring His Son (Francisco Goya)
Francisco “Raven” Goya, with a solid helping of sanity-shattering
nightmare fuel...
QUESTIONS, CORRECTIONS
and/or ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
For your reference,
You can view and download this PowerPoint at:
htt...
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Most famous paintings of all time

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Most famous paintings of all time

  1. 1. Totallyhistory.com
  2. 2. The Last Supper, 1495-1498 By: Leonardo da Vinci A fifteenth century mural painting done in Milan by da Vinci, The Last Supper depicts the final feast Jesus had with his Twelve Apostles during which he announces one of them would betray him.
  3. 3. School of Athens, c. 1510 By: Raphael The School of Athens (or Scuola di Atene in Italian) was one of Raphael’s commissions in the Stanze di Raffaello in the Vatican. The School of Athens is considered Raphael’s master artwork and is considered the perfect example of High Renaissance art.
  4. 4. Mona Lisa, c. 1503-1519 By: Leonardo da Vinci This painting depicts Lisa del Giocondo whose expression is well-known for the enigmatic aura emanating from it. The Mona Lisa is possibly the most famous painting in the world of all time.
  5. 5. Whistler’s Mother, 1871 By: James McNeill Whistler Whistler painted his mother, Anna McNeill Whistler, when the original model failed to come to the appointment. The painting was not well-received when he submitted it to the Royal Academy of Art in London for exhibition, but shortly later the public showed much respect and deference for it, quickly restoring Whistler’s honor.
  6. 6. The Starry Night, 1889 By: Vincent van Gogh Considered to be the best and most famous work of Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night was created from memory and portrays the sight outside the window of his sanitarium room at night.
  7. 7. The Scream, 1893 By: Edvard Munch In a series of paintings reproduced with various media known as Scream, Edvard Munch conveys an extremely anxious and trembling person standing at the fenced edge of a road. The scene was identified as the view from a road overlooking Oslo, Norway.
  8. 8. The Great Wave off Kanagawa, c. 1829-32 By: Katsushika Hokusai The Great Wave off Kanagawa is a woodblock print that is Hokusai’s most famous work. This woodblock is the most well-known piece of Japanese art in the world. It depicts an giant wave towering boats near Kanagawa. Mt. Fuji appears in the background.
  9. 9. The Son of Man, 1964 By: Rene Magritte Magritte painted The Son of Man, or Le fils de l’homme, as a self-portrait. The painting depicts a man in a suit with a bowler hat; his face is mostly obscured by a green apple. The theme of the art work is a conflict between that which is visible and that which is hidden. The parts of a person we want to see is often obscured by what is visible.
  10. 10. Posted by Rick Raule on February 8, 2012 in Arts, Entertainment
  11. 11. No. 5, 1948 (Jackson Pollock) Pollock’s abstract, almost violently expressionist, style tends to divide people into two large groups: those who think that he ran the greatest long con in history by disguising paint drippings as art, and those who think that he was just really untalented and most of his paintings were meant to be bowls of fruit. There however is a third, tiny group of people who genuinely admire Pollock’s work and are ready to pay big money for it. 156.8 million (adjusted for inflation), real American dollars, to be exact, which is what Pollock’s No. 5, 1948 fetched in 2006 after being sold to an anonymous buyer.
  12. 12. Black Square (Kazimir Malevich) The Ukraine-born Malevich is credited as the creator of Suprematism which, to my surprise, is an actual name of a real art form. The basics of Suprematism boil down to “simple geometric shapes” and Black Square might be the style’s greatest example. It’s bold, yet timid. Passionate, yet lifeless. Square, and yet round. It’s just a black square, but even though looks more like a parody of a real painting, don’t let it fool you; almost every work by Malevich is worth upwards to a million dollars.
  13. 13. Composition 8 (Vasily Kandinsky) Though no one has a definite answer to the question of “What is art?” many people may agree on something like “Whatever is created to convey a message from the author” and, in this regard, Kandinsky out-arts all the other suckers in the business. Kandinsky spent his life trying to find the perfect combination of shapes and colors to show people just how he saw and experienced the world. Now, looking at Composition 8, you’re in your rights to think that he was obviously a dangerous loon with at least three schizophrenias, but modern researchers believe Kandinsky was in fact suffering from synesthesia, a condition which sort of mixes one’s senses. A person with synesthesia might thus actually hear color and see music and, if that was the case with Kandinsky, then that man lived in a colorful, melodious universe that us mere mortals can only dream of ever understanding.
  14. 14. Guernica (Pablo Picasso) You can’t really see it here, but Picasso’s Guernica is HUGE, measuring 11×25.6ft . It features humans, animals and buildings, all depicted in that famous Picasso style which I still claim was an inside joke of his that got out of hand, but let’s move past that. Guernica is definitely one of the most all-encapsulating Picasso works, but what really sets it apart from the others is its message. Examining it, you can’t help but feel a little uncomfortable. The twisted faces, the solemn colors…it’s all a little…unnerving. And that’s the point, because the painting was meant to represent the horrors of war.
  15. 15. The Birth of Venus (Sandro Botticelli) Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus is beautiful with the colors and the composition and all that other crap but here’s the thing: that Venus is totally hot. Not too skinny, not too chubby, her hair might very well be blonde, red or light brown and ,though she’s naked, she only lets you see enough to kick-start your imagination into a wild frenzy.
  16. 16. Saturn Devouring His Son (Francisco Goya) Francisco “Raven” Goya, with a solid helping of sanity-shattering nightmare fuel. Look at that thing. Look at its bizarre hobo beard. Look at the huge anime-esque eyes and the bodybuilder physique. LOOK AT IT TOTALLY EATING A GUY AND LETTING YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE NEXT. Crap on a stick, that is some sick stuff. But it has a reasonable explanation. That monster thing is Saturn, a Roman god said to devour his children because it was foretold that one of them will overthrow him. It is pretty gruesome, but at least there’s some reason behind it. However, why Goya decided to paint THAT in his dining room will remain a mystery to all of us who don’t constantly hear the crying of a thousand infants in our heads like Goya obviously did.
  17. 17. QUESTIONS, CORRECTIONS and/or ADDITIONAL INFORMATION For your reference, You can view and download this PowerPoint at: http://www.slideshare.net/johnlesterdurana/most-famous-paintings-of-all-times

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