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Creating a new teaching programme within a functional model - Carey

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Presented at LILAC 2019

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Creating a new teaching programme within a functional model - Carey

  1. 1. LILAC Information Literacy Conference University of Nottingham 25 April 2019 Áine Carey Teaching & Research Development Librarian Twitter: @aine_carey And action…!
  2. 2. About me and my role  Manage Teaching and Research Development team in MU Library  Functional model based on Teaching & Learning, Research Support, and Academic Engagement  Worked across a range of information environments (larger / specialist academic environments; private sector consulting)  ‘Client-facing’: getting to students’ point-of-need
  3. 3. Maynooth University
  4. 4. What I’ll cover Why we chose a functional model – and what it looks like The impact on teaching Our activity-based model of teaching What we have learned – and where we are headed
  5. 5. Move towards a functional model  Existing subject-based structure (based on Faculty) not reflecting changing information landscape - academic integrity; writing skills; open access; critical thinking and analysis  Gaps and overlap in our IL provision  Not exploiting our expertise fully – responsive rather than proactive  Need to meet the varied information needs of a growing, diverse community  Issues of scale – how we continue to reach an ever-increasing student population  Introduction of a new undergraduate curriculum with information literacy at its core
  6. 6. A new curriculum with a key focus on critical skills ‘…graduates are expected to be … capable of gathering and critiquing information from a variety of sources’ (Maynooth University, 2015)
  7. 7. • Mapping & evaluating the information landscape • Managing & presenting information • Managing the transition • Understanding ethical & social dimensions of information • Researching within the disciplines Deep Knowledge & Critical intellectual skills Autonomous and responsible learners Breadth of perspective Skills for life and work Information Literacy Framework for ‘A Maynooth Education’
  8. 8. Research support: bibliometrics, open access, research impact Classes: mapped to our IL Framework Online support tools and tutorials Teaching & Learning Academic Liaison Research Support Academic Engagement TRD Functional Model Academic Engagement: via Library Reps, Heads of Departments, Faculty meetings; holistic & symbiotic
  9. 9. • Mapping & evaluating the information landscape • Managing & presenting information • Managing the transition • Understanding ethical & social dimensions of information • Researching within the disciplines Deep Knowledge & Critical intellectual skills Autonomous and responsible learners Breadth of perspective Skills for life and work Mapping our classes to our MU Information Literacy Framework Successful Searching By the end of this session, your students should be able to effectively find academic information and use library resources. This can be tailored to any subject Evaluating Information Students will develop their ability to evaluate information and thereby find the information most relevant for use in their assignments Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism Students will learn to recognise plagiarism, improve their knowledge of referencing and develop skills for managing their references Databases in your subject Students will learn how to access and navigate some of the top recommended databases in their subject area
  10. 10. Promoting classes
  11. 11. Explaining the benefit
  12. 12. Menu of choices
  13. 13. Academics book using forms
  14. 14. Teaching approach • Agreed learning outcomes • Standardised lesson plans • Establishing students’ prior learning
  15. 15. Initial outcomes  Some concern from academics – especially departments who had specific, intensive engagement with Subject Librarians previously  Within the team, uncertainty about how we worked now as a team; fear of losing touch with one another  Were we losing specialism? Becoming ‘generic’?  Worked really well for departments and staff we were newly engaging with – gave them a route map of support and opportunities for collaboration  Created an opportunity for the Library to have a clear voice in Teaching & Learning forum  Enunciated our IL expertise clearly
  16. 16. During the pilot phase  Initially resistant academics quickly endorsed our new approach  New opportunities for collaboration and co- teaching  Lecturers as partners in the classroom – the key to success  Each class retains the same learning outcomes but is adapted to meet the specific module requirements  Based on identified point-of-need e.g. an assignment, project or thesis  Within the team, actively seeking areas of collaboration – where do we need to meet and work together? Identification of projects  Weekly catch-up meetings  Individual regular meetings with each team member  Away-days to build team-working and work through concerns
  17. 17. Activity-based classes
  18. 18. Where we are now  Collaboration with academics is vital – linking the class activity with what is being covered in the module and their lectures  Attendance of lecturer at classes ensures that the lecturer too is following IL best practice!  Learning outcomes and ensuring these are achieved is the key – this may involve changing approach during the class  Co-teaching approach now in place – essential for allowing responsive approaches in class  Pre-class tools and post-class follow up matter  Focus on the student experience – did they respond? Interact? Participate? Did they ask questions or admit they weren’t sure? Can you establish an enhanced sense of engagement for each student by the end of the class? Was the atmosphere warm, responsive and relaxed?
  19. 19. Next steps  Continuing to examine what we do!  Get more student feedback (academic feedback positive)  Pre-class tools – partner with Critical Skills to develop an IL quiz that could be credit-bearing if wanted  What about more able students? How do we facilitate students who are doing well and want to attain a higher grade?  Where is the students’ point-of-need? E.g. for most it revolves around an understanding (or lack of) the academic research and writing process. Tailor classes to focus on assignments  Scaffolded classes – how do we progress from one-shot classes?  Co-teaching – a success for students and has positively impacted our team  Supporting Teaching & Learning Librarians to feel confident in this fluid teaching appraoch  Embedding our online resources within module content – initial steps taken, essential if we are to reach students more effectively  Catering for out-of-hours students and classes - how to deliver parity of service
  20. 20. Áine Carey Job Title Maynooth University Email: aine.carey@mu.ie Telephone: 00353 1 474 7123 Twitter: @aine_carey See what we do: https://nuim.libguides.com/guides_tutorials

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