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The Mindful Instruction
Librarian and the “One-Shot”
Meredith Farkas
Portland Community College
Association of Christian L...
Hi! I’m Meredith
Faculty Librarian at Portland Community College and
part-time faculty at San Jose State University’s iSch...
What we’re going to talk about
Limitations of one-shot instruction
Extending the one-shot and infusing information literac...
What does your instruction
program look like?
Issues with the one-shot
Time
constraints
The need to
focus on just a
few things in
the session
We don’t know
where students are
in their learning
Students don’t
know what they
don’t know
What is covered is
often out of sync
with where
students are
Students are
coming into a
foreign context
The difficulties in
building rapport
The
difficulties in
building on
anything we
do
Alternatives to the one-shot
Flipped instruction
Workshops
Sequenced, scaffolded library instruction across a course or a
...
What does your instruction program look
like and what would you like it to look like?
Embedded in the curriculum or depend...
The keys to meaningful
embedment of information literacy
Build strong relationships with faculty and
departments
Get on co...
An example at PCC: Developmental
Education and Composition/Lit
Most of our students go through the Reading/Writing
course ...
The results of that work
Lots of great collaborations with faculty and opportunities to try
new methods of instruction
Clo...
My experience with flipped
instruction: Web-based pre-
assignments that teach and assess
The specifics
Can be created in Google Forms or Qualtrics
(even Survey Monkey would work)
Text and video that teach skills;...
The secret sauce
Pre-assignment is required (for a grade)
Instruction session is developed based on the
results of the wor...
The results
My understanding is increased
My instruction is more tailored
I can cover more ground / less DB demoing
Studen...
The Challenges
Having enough lead time
Getting faculty on-board
Having time to analyze the results
Tutorial integration
A solution to the problem of teaching
the right things at the wrong time
Tutorials
Integrate into classes via faculty outreach
Have students watch in-class at logical points
in their learning
Hav...
At PCC
Grant to build video tutorials to support
Reading, Writing, and ESOL classes at the 100
and pre-100 levels
Working ...
Building Toolkits and
Training the Trainers
At Portland State university in the
Freshman Inquiry (FRINQ) program
Developed learning objects and activities that addres...
Step 2 of PCC tutorial grant project
Build a toolkit to package tutorials with
activities, lesson plans, etc. for faculty
...
Influencing student information
literacy through assignment design
Learning Assessment Council’s 

College Writing Assessment
Advanced Design Process
Led by Center for Online Learning
instructional designers
For programs and departments, not indivi...
What skills do your students need to have
to successfully complete your current
assignment?
Which of those do you explicit...
After the Advanced Design
Workshops
Quarterly library workshops on assignment
design for faculty
Hampered by low attendanc...
Discussion
Where do you see opportunities at
your institution for doing some of this
work and going beyond the one-shot?
W...
Assessment and the
One-Shot
Assessment fallacies
Assessment must objectively measure student
information literacy skills (iSkills, etc.)
Assessment is...
Types of assessment
Self-assessment
Satisfaction survey
Reflection
Tests / quizzes
Analyzing student work (papers, portfoli...
Assessment in the one-shot
Formative assessments / pre-assignments
Self-assessment
Satisfaction survey
Reflection
One-minut...
Assessment beyond the one-shot
Self-assessment throughout the course
Reflection at the end of the term
Assessing student wo...
Building a culture of instructional
assessment
Start small, where the light is good; build short-term wins
Start from a pl...
Reflective Practice and Peer
Learning for Instructional
Improvement
What do you do after you teach a
class?
Take the time to reflect!
What went well?
What didn’t?
What made you feel uncomfortable?
What made you feel great?
What wou...
Learning and reflection are
amplified in a learning
community
Ways to learn together
Instructional observation
Reflective Peer Coaching
Community of Practice
Which is best and how these...
Instructional observation
Colleagues watch each other teach
Can involve pre-session discussion, debrief,
and/or constructi...
Reflective Peer Coaching
“Examines intentions prior to teaching and reflections afterwards.”
- Dale Vidmar
Pairs meet once b...
Community of Practice
“We need others to complement and develop our own expertise.”
- Etienne Wenger
Focused on learning, ...
The Framework for Information
Literacy for Higher Education
-Information Literacy Competency Standards for
Higher Education
“Information literacy is a set of
abilities requiring indi...
The InfoLit Competency Standards
Defined what an information literate student looked like
through outcomes — things they co...
Is information literacy just a set of mechanical
skills that students can quickly learn?
Does it include dispositions, aff...
-Learning the Ropes: How Freshmen Conduct Course
Research Once They Enter College
“It was daunting to conduct online
searc...
Framework for Information
Literacy for Higher Education
“ Two added elements illustrate important
learning goals related t...
Examples of “dispositions” from
the Framework
“develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and
sometimes co...
The Framework is structured
around “Threshold Concepts”
“Core ideas and processes that define the ways of thinking and prac...
Framework for Information
Literacy for Higher Education
Defines six threshold concepts central to information literacy
Auth...
The Framework is flexible
“Neither the knowledge practices nor the
dispositions that support each concept are intended
to p...
This is a big shift for some,
not so big for others
We can’t do this alone and the
Framework sees information literacy
instruction as a partnership
How do we know they are information
literate? Student reflection is critical
Threshold Concepts Golden
Line Activity
Choose one of the concepts from
the Framework
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual
Information Creation as a Process
In...
After a close reading, select
at least one phrase that
speaks to you.
How can the framework
inform our teaching?
Let’s Assess!
1. Something useful you learned or thought
more about today
2. Something you wish was covered in
more depth ...
Questions? Comments?
Challenges?
Meredith Farkas
meredith.farkas [at] pcc.edu
Blog: meredith.wolfwater.com
Twitter: librar...
Selected Readings
The entire 7.2 (2013) and especially 9.2 (2015) issues of Communications in Information Literacy.
Brasle...
Selected Readings (cont’d)
Kvenild, Cassandra, and Kaijsa Calkins, Ed. Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruc...
Image credits
Clock https://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/14272872595/
Arthur Samuel Atkinson https://commons.wikimedia.org/wik...
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"
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The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"

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Presentation slides for the 2016 Association of Christian Librarians Conference

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The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the "One-Shot"

  1. 1. The Mindful Instruction Librarian and the “One-Shot” Meredith Farkas Portland Community College Association of Christian Librarians Conference | June 13, 2016
  2. 2. Hi! I’m Meredith Faculty Librarian at Portland Community College and part-time faculty at San Jose State University’s iSchool Previously Head of Instructional Services, Portland State University Head of Instructional Initiatives, Norwich University (VT) Distance Learning Librarian, Norwich University (VT)
  3. 3. What we’re going to talk about Limitations of one-shot instruction Extending the one-shot and infusing information literacy into the curriculum Meaningful assessment Reflective practice and peer learning for instructional improvement The Framework for Information Literacy and its impact on our practice
  4. 4. What does your instruction program look like?
  5. 5. Issues with the one-shot
  6. 6. Time constraints The need to focus on just a few things in the session
  7. 7. We don’t know where students are in their learning Students don’t know what they don’t know
  8. 8. What is covered is often out of sync with where students are
  9. 9. Students are coming into a foreign context The difficulties in building rapport
  10. 10. The difficulties in building on anything we do
  11. 11. Alternatives to the one-shot Flipped instruction Workshops Sequenced, scaffolded library instruction across a course or a series of courses Disciplinary faculty also teach information literacy Being embedded in a class Co-teaching For-credit information literacy courses
  12. 12. What does your instruction program look like and what would you like it to look like? Embedded in the curriculum or dependent on individual instructors? Intentional or “by request”? Mostly one-shots? For-credit? Embedded? Scaffolded? What does your instruction program’s assessment work look like?
  13. 13. The keys to meaningful embedment of information literacy Build strong relationships with faculty and departments Get on committees, join faculty discussion groups/communities of practice/etc. Get involved in curriculum development/ design and review Don’t just focus on library goals
  14. 14. An example at PCC: Developmental Education and Composition/Lit Most of our students go through the Reading/Writing course sequence (RD 115, WR 121, WR 122) Library activities Participating in department meetings Participating on Dev. Ed. redesign committees Participating in RD/WR community of practice Speaking at teaching and learning symposia
  15. 15. The results of that work Lots of great collaborations with faculty and opportunities to try new methods of instruction Close embedment of information literacy in Reading 115 classes. Working with disciplinary faculty to develop information literacy video tutorials (more on that later) Course outcomes for new Integrated Reading/Writing 115 class include information literacy We are always invited into conversations about curriculum and pedagogy now
  16. 16. My experience with flipped instruction: Web-based pre- assignments that teach and assess
  17. 17. The specifics Can be created in Google Forms or Qualtrics (even Survey Monkey would work) Text and video that teach skills; activities that allow students to practice those skills Students do authentic research on their own research topic
  18. 18. The secret sauce Pre-assignment is required (for a grade) Instruction session is developed based on the results of the worksheet
  19. 19. The results My understanding is increased My instruction is more tailored I can cover more ground / less DB demoing Students are more engaged Students directly benefit from the assessment
  20. 20. The Challenges Having enough lead time Getting faculty on-board Having time to analyze the results
  21. 21. Tutorial integration A solution to the problem of teaching the right things at the wrong time
  22. 22. Tutorials Integrate into classes via faculty outreach Have students watch in-class at logical points in their learning Have students watch as homework with an activity that has them practice those skills Have students watch before library session (perhaps with a library pre-assignment)
  23. 23. At PCC Grant to build video tutorials to support Reading, Writing, and ESOL classes at the 100 and pre-100 levels Working collaboratively with faculty to develop learning outcomes, get feedback on storyboards, etc. Meant to supplement library instruction
  24. 24. Building Toolkits and Training the Trainers
  25. 25. At Portland State university in the Freshman Inquiry (FRINQ) program Developed learning objects and activities that address most important outcomes for Freshman Inquiry Created LibGuides toolkit to support faculty and peer-mentors in teaching information literacy beyond our one-or-two-shot Train-the-trainer Participated in orientations for peer mentors and faculty in- service Consulted with faculty and peer-mentors to create custom lesson plans
  26. 26. Step 2 of PCC tutorial grant project Build a toolkit to package tutorials with activities, lesson plans, etc. for faculty Work on outreach and communication for faculty
  27. 27. Influencing student information literacy through assignment design
  28. 28. Learning Assessment Council’s 
 College Writing Assessment
  29. 29. Advanced Design Process Led by Center for Online Learning instructional designers For programs and departments, not individuals Focused on backwards design Library gets four hours 2 hrs. using library resources in classes 2 hrs. research assignment design
  30. 30. What skills do your students need to have to successfully complete your current assignment? Which of those do you explicitly teach?
  31. 31. After the Advanced Design Workshops Quarterly library workshops on assignment design for faculty Hampered by low attendance Discussions with GenEd Writing Coordinator to create a FRINQ Model Research/Writing Assignment Repository
  32. 32. Discussion Where do you see opportunities at your institution for doing some of this work and going beyond the one-shot? What would it take to make it happen?
  33. 33. Assessment and the One-Shot
  34. 34. Assessment fallacies Assessment must objectively measure student information literacy skills (iSkills, etc.) Assessment is a measure of how well we did as instructors We can isolate the librarian’s/library's contribution to student information literacy Assessment must happen during the one-shot to be useful
  35. 35. Types of assessment Self-assessment Satisfaction survey Reflection Tests / quizzes Analyzing student work (papers, portfolios, bibliographies, etc.) Classroom assessment techniques / performance assessment Action research
  36. 36. Assessment in the one-shot Formative assessments / pre-assignments Self-assessment Satisfaction survey Reflection One-minute papers Performance assessments
  37. 37. Assessment beyond the one-shot Self-assessment throughout the course Reflection at the end of the term Assessing student work Action research
  38. 38. Building a culture of instructional assessment Start small, where the light is good; build short-term wins Start from a place of curiosity Don’t make it about individual results or judgment People need time to learn about assessment, experiment with assessment, analyze results, and learn from assessment Learn together, share results
  39. 39. Reflective Practice and Peer Learning for Instructional Improvement
  40. 40. What do you do after you teach a class?
  41. 41. Take the time to reflect! What went well? What didn’t? What made you feel uncomfortable? What made you feel great? What would you like to do differently next time? What do you want to remember for the next time you work with that instructor?
  42. 42. Learning and reflection are amplified in a learning community
  43. 43. Ways to learn together Instructional observation Reflective Peer Coaching Community of Practice Which is best and how these are structured depend on your setting/culture.
  44. 44. Instructional observation Colleagues watch each other teach Can involve pre-session discussion, debrief, and/or constructive suggestions or not
  45. 45. Reflective Peer Coaching “Examines intentions prior to teaching and reflections afterwards.” - Dale Vidmar Pairs meet once before a session to discuss goals Pairs meet after the session to debrief Focused on reflection and questioning, not suggesting or advising Vidmar’s model includes an observer who makes sure that the pair is focused on questioning, not suggesting or advising and makes note of interesting comments Vidmar, Dale J. “Reflective peer coaching: Crafting collaborative self-assessment in teaching.” Research Strategies 20.3 (2005): 135-148.
  46. 46. Community of Practice “We need others to complement and develop our own expertise.” - Etienne Wenger Focused on learning, not work Purposes Workshop instructional ideas/problems/sessions Journal club Discuss information literacy issues Etc.
  47. 47. The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education
  48. 48. -Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education “Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.’”
  49. 49. The InfoLit Competency Standards Defined what an information literate student looked like through outcomes — things they could do Examples: “Explores general information sources to increase familiarity with the topic” “Identifies keywords, synonyms and related terms for the information needed” “Recognizes prejudice, deception, or manipulation” “Selects an appropriate documentation style and uses it consistently to cite sources”
  50. 50. Is information literacy just a set of mechanical skills that students can quickly learn? Does it include dispositions, affect, and habits of mind? What about curiosity? Help-seeking? Persistence?
  51. 51. -Learning the Ropes: How Freshmen Conduct Course Research Once They Enter College “It was daunting to conduct online searches for academic literature. Nearly three-fourths of the sample (74%) said they struggled with selecting keywords and formulating efficient search queries.”
  52. 52. Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education “ Two added elements illustrate important learning goals related to those concepts: knowledge practices, which are demonstrations of ways in which learners can increase their understanding of these information literacy concepts, and dispositions, which describe ways in which to address the affective, attitudinal, or valuing dimension of learning. ”
  53. 53. Examples of “dispositions” from the Framework “develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives” “value intellectual curiosity in developing questions and learning new investigative methods” “value persistence, adaptability, and flexibility and recognize that ambiguity can benefit the research process” “seek appropriate help when needed” “exhibit mental flexibility and creativity” “understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results”
  54. 54. The Framework is structured around “Threshold Concepts” “Core ideas and processes that define the ways of thinking and practicing for a discipline, but are so ingrained that they often go unspoken or unrecognized by practitioners.” Characteristics Transformative Troublesome Irreversible Integrative Bounded Townsend, L., Brunetti, K., & Hofer, A. R. (2011). Threshold concepts and information literacy. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 11(3), 853-869.
  55. 55. Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Defines six threshold concepts central to information literacy Authority Is Constructed and Contextual Information Creation as a Process Information Has Value Research as Inquiry Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strategic Exploration
  56. 56. The Framework is flexible “Neither the knowledge practices nor the dispositions that support each concept are intended to prescribe what local institutions should do in using the Framework; each library and its partners on campus will need to deploy these frames to best fit their own situation, including designing learning outcomes. For the same reason, these lists should not be considered exhaustive.”
  57. 57. This is a big shift for some, not so big for others
  58. 58. We can’t do this alone and the Framework sees information literacy instruction as a partnership
  59. 59. How do we know they are information literate? Student reflection is critical
  60. 60. Threshold Concepts Golden Line Activity
  61. 61. Choose one of the concepts from the Framework Authority Is Constructed and Contextual Information Creation as a Process Information Has Value Research as Inquiry Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strategic Exploration
  62. 62. After a close reading, select at least one phrase that speaks to you.
  63. 63. How can the framework inform our teaching?
  64. 64. Let’s Assess! 1. Something useful you learned or thought more about today 2. Something you wish was covered in more depth or at all
  65. 65. Questions? Comments? Challenges? Meredith Farkas meredith.farkas [at] pcc.edu Blog: meredith.wolfwater.com Twitter: librarianmer Slides available at
  66. 66. Selected Readings The entire 7.2 (2013) and especially 9.2 (2015) issues of Communications in Information Literacy. Brasley, Stephanie Sterling. “Effective librarian and discipline faculty collaboration models for integrating information literacy into the fabric of an academic institution.” New Directions for Teaching and Learning 2008.114 (2008): 71-88. Bravender, Patricia, McClure, Hazel, and Schaub, Gayle. Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts : Lesson Plans for Librarians. Chicago, Illinois: Association of College and Research Libraries, A Division of the American Library Association, 2015. Dempsey, Paula R., and Heather Jagman. "“I Felt Like Such a Freshman”: First-Year Students Crossing the Library Threshold." portal: Libraries and the Academy 16.1 (2016): 89-107. Fister, Barbara. “Fostering information literacy through faculty development.” Library Issues: Briefings for Faculty and Administrators 29.4 (2009). Head, Alison J. "Learning the ropes: How freshmen conduct course research once they enter college." Project Information Literacy (2013). Hofer, Amy R., Lori Townsend, and Korey Brunetti. "Troublesome concepts and information literacy: Investigating threshold concepts for IL instruction." portal: Libraries and the Academy 12.4 (2012): 387-405.
  67. 67. Selected Readings (cont’d) Kvenild, Cassandra, and Kaijsa Calkins, Ed. Embedded Librarians: Moving Beyond One-Shot Instruction. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2011. Oakleaf, Megan. "A roadmap for assessing student learning using the new framework for information literacy for higher education." The Journal of Academic Librarianship 5.40 (2014): 510-514. Oakleaf, Megan, and Neal Kaske. "Guiding questions for assessing information literacy in higher education." portal: Libraries and the Academy 9.2 (2009): 273-286. Oakleaf, Megan, Michelle S. Millet, and Leah Kraus. "All together now: getting faculty, administrators, and staff engaged in information literacy assessment." portal: Libraries and the Academy 11.3 (2011): 831-852. Olivares, Olivia. 2010. The sufficiently embedded librarian: Defining and establishing productive librarian-faculty partnerships in academic libraries. Public Services Quarterly 6 : 140. Swanson, Troy A., and Jagman, Heather. Not Just Where to Click : Teaching Students How to Think about Information. Chicago, Illinois: Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association, 2015. Print. ACRL Publications in Librarianship ; No. 68. Townsend, Lori, Korey Brunetti, and Amy R. Hofer. "Threshold concepts and information literacy." portal: Libraries and the Academy 11.3 (2011): 853-869. Vidmar, Dale J. "Reflective peer coaching: Crafting collaborative self-assessment in teaching." Research Strategies 20.3 (2005): 135-148.
  68. 68. Image credits Clock https://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/14272872595/ Arthur Samuel Atkinson https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Arthur_Samuel_Atkinson_looking_through_a_telescope.jpg Time https://www.flickr.com/photos/darthmauldds/16423793317/ Woolworth Building under construction https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ History_of_construction#/media/File:Woolworth_Building_2_Feb._1912_LC-USZ62-105567.jpg First man walking on the moon http://www.public-domain-image.com/free-images/space/first- man-on-moon-walking-on-the-moon/attachment/first-man-on-moon-walking-on-the-moon Roots of a very big tree http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roots_of_big_old_tree.jpg Girl child fish reflection https://pixabay.com/en/girl-child-fish-reflection-953408/ Mad Men http://strawberryfieldswhatever.blogspot.com/2015_04_01_archive.html Question mark cloud https://www.flickr.com/photos/gsi-r/4767700249

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