Ham Radio:
More Than Talking to Pork
        Products
     Chris Sullivan, NØDOS
What is Amateur Radio?

The legal version:

quot;... A radiocommunication service for the
purpose of self-training, interc...
What is Amateur Radio?

My version:


Geeks playing with radio.
It's supposed to be a technologist's
                playground.

  It's supposed to be about learning new
               ...
Who are these people?  It's a conspiracy!
We all know this about ham radio, right?

  Disaster communications
  (OR/WA floods, Katrina)
  Talking to distant places
...
DIY is alive and well in ham radio



Even today, the
homebrew scene is
alive in amateur
radio.
Experimentation is encouraged.

You are encouraged to try different
things, test theoretical designs and
experimental equi...
The Distant Past (the early 1990s)

  Packet Radio gave slow
  (typically 1.2k/sec) access to the
  early Internet
   It d...
WiFi.. across miles, not feet

  Channel 1-6 is in ham radio
  spectrum
  Hams are using off-the-shelf
  hardware
  Homebr...
Montana MultiMedia Network



First experimental link was
mountain top to mountain
top, Red Lodge to Crazy
Peak, near Boze...
The most amazing thing?

     IT WORKED.

   2-4 Mb/s, 90 miles
1.2k/sec.. 1200 baud.. remember those
days?
  Google's new Latitude
  service? Hams were doing it
  in the 1990's
  APRS u...
APRS - Brightkite, unplugged.

APRS can relay more
than location:
telemetry, weather
information, short
SMS-style messages...
And guess what?


It does all of this using 1200
baud modems, the likes of
which were quot;obsoletequot; in the
1980's.
A ...
It's just the tip of the iceberg.
 Amateur Television
 quot;Impossiblequot; communications - slow modes near noise floor
 ...
Modern Ham Radios

The basement room of equipment? Largely gone!
There are a few rules.


  No commercial use
  No profanity
  Stay in our yard
  Don't be a jerk.
There's plenty left to do!

  It's never been easier to get started
  No more Morse code requirements
  Basic electronics,...
Longer notes, pointers to more information at my website:
http://nødos.org/#ip5
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14 Chris Sullivan: Ham Radio: It's not about talking to pork products (but we're working on that)

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Amateur radio is still alive and well, and coming into the 21st Century as a playground for the technically curious. In addition to the work hams do in disaster relief communications, there is a lot of place for experimentation and learning. Ham radio is pushing the envelope in digital voice communications, high-speed "Internet" over incredible distances, and providing a fertile playground for the technologically curious. Understanding our wireless world and how it works starts with an entry-level ham radio license: where you take it from there is up to you..

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14 Chris Sullivan: Ham Radio: It's not about talking to pork products (but we're working on that)

  1. 1. Ham Radio: More Than Talking to Pork Products Chris Sullivan, NØDOS
  2. 2. What is Amateur Radio? The legal version: quot;... A radiocommunication service for the purpose of self-training, intercommunication and technical investigations carried out by amateurs, that is, duly authorized persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest.quot; -FCC Rules, Part 97
  3. 3. What is Amateur Radio? My version: Geeks playing with radio.
  4. 4. It's supposed to be a technologist's playground. It's supposed to be about learning new things. It's supposed to be about fun. When was the last time the government did something specifically for techno-geeks to play around?
  5. 5. Who are these people?  It's a conspiracy!
  6. 6. We all know this about ham radio, right? Disaster communications (OR/WA floods, Katrina) Talking to distant places It must be cool, it's big in Japan!
  7. 7. DIY is alive and well in ham radio Even today, the homebrew scene is alive in amateur radio.
  8. 8. Experimentation is encouraged. You are encouraged to try different things, test theoretical designs and experimental equipment, hack, turn knobs, and generally try to break things. And yes, void your warranties.
  9. 9. The Distant Past (the early 1990s) Packet Radio gave slow (typically 1.2k/sec) access to the early Internet It didn't stop there.
  10. 10. WiFi.. across miles, not feet Channel 1-6 is in ham radio spectrum Hams are using off-the-shelf hardware Homebrew and commercial amplifiers add range 90 mile WiFi?
  11. 11. Montana MultiMedia Network First experimental link was mountain top to mountain top, Red Lodge to Crazy Peak, near Bozeman MT.
  12. 12. The most amazing thing? IT WORKED. 2-4 Mb/s, 90 miles
  13. 13. 1.2k/sec.. 1200 baud.. remember those days? Google's new Latitude service? Hams were doing it in the 1990's APRS uses GPS, packet radio to transmit positions to other hams, the Internet
  14. 14. APRS - Brightkite, unplugged. APRS can relay more than location: telemetry, weather information, short SMS-style messages.. all automatically!
  15. 15. And guess what? It does all of this using 1200 baud modems, the likes of which were quot;obsoletequot; in the 1980's. A modern modem is 50x faster, and that's WAY slower than most people's Internet connection now a days... yikes!
  16. 16. It's just the tip of the iceberg. Amateur Television quot;Impossiblequot; communications - slow modes near noise floor Experimental modes Software-defined radios Store and forward packet radio Talking to the International Space Station / Space Shuttle Amateur radio satellites Earth-moon-earth and meteor scatter Portable communications Microwave and Nanowave Light beam communications Narrow-bandwidth digital voice Auroral / coronal discharge Radios in used pork product tins Talking to arrogant windbags on 7.290 MHz
  17. 17. Modern Ham Radios The basement room of equipment? Largely gone!
  18. 18. There are a few rules. No commercial use No profanity Stay in our yard Don't be a jerk.
  19. 19. There's plenty left to do! It's never been easier to get started No more Morse code requirements Basic electronics, operational knowledge
  20. 20. Longer notes, pointers to more information at my website: http://nødos.org/#ip5

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