Literacy work station ashleigh terry

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Literacy work station ashleigh terry

  1. 1. Literacy Work Station:Destination Imagination <br />Lewis and Clark Expedition<br />&<br />Westward Expansion <br />Mrs. Terry’s Forth Grade Class<br />
  2. 2. The Lewis and Clark Expedition Station <br /><ul><li> The Lewis and Clark Expedition materials will be displayed and used once I begin discussing the Lewis and Clark Expedition in class. This station serves as another avenue for students to study Lewis and Clark through listening, art, puppets, games, and writing activities. The materials needed for the station are in the storage container and a materials list as been provided. Students will need to clean up the station after use: they know the proper procedure.
  3. 3. Assessment at the station will mostly be participation points. I will observe students and check their names on a participation clipboard each day we use the station . In order to receive positive participation marks in the listening, reading, puppets, and games stations students will need to remain on task and work well with others. Art projects will be turned in the “finished basket” or “still working” basket. Later projects will be displayed in the room or hallway and written work will be assessed for a grade based on content, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Once the time spent at the work station is complete, students will turn in a piece of paper with two-three sentences describing what they worked on for the day and what they liked best. These papers will be placed in the Reflection Folder. </li></li></ul><li>Materials<br />Reading<br />Buddy reading visors<br />Sticky notes<br />Cork board<br />Various books<br />Lewis and Clark Timeline<br />Two of the same book<br />( Lewis & Clark: Journey Across the Missouri River)<br />Pillows<br />Blankets<br />Pop-up tent, to read in<br />Pencils<br />Pens<br />Paper <br />Pointers<br />Writing<br />Copy of a friendly letter<br />Paper <br />Pencils<br />Pens<br />Blank books<br />Variety of books<br />Envelopes<br />Copy of the Writing process<br />Camping list Stationary <br />Photo of Lewis and Clark <br />Art<br />Construction paper<br />Glue<br />Scissors<br />Markers<br />Crayons<br />Pipe Cleaners<br />The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark<br />Listening <br />Spinoza CD<br />The Legend of Spinoza: The Bear Who Speaks from the Heart<br />Paper<br />Crayons<br />Microphone<br />Prairie Dog stuffed animal<br />CD Player<br />2 sets of Headphones <br />Games<br />Lewis and Clark Bingo<br />Bingo Cards<br />Fact Calling Cards<br />Bingo chips<br />Puppets<br />Books<br />Poems<br />Puppets<br />
  4. 4. ListeningStation Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  5. 5. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li> Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  6. 6. Listen for enjoyment, information, directions to identify tone, mood and emotion of verbalandnonverbal communication. CA-LS04A01
  7. 7. In discussions and presentations, present ideas in a logical sequence as well as identify and apply appropriate speaking techniques such as volume control, pace and eye contact. CA-LS04A02
  8. 8. Number of students: one-two
  9. 9. Activity explanation: At the listening station students will have the option to listen to a recorded book, listen to a partner read, or read aloud using a microphone to a stuffed animal. While listening to a book on disc students can follow along and turn the pages. After listening to the story the student can draw a picture of their favorite or most meaningful part, or write a paragraph describing why they didn’t or didn’t like the story. The other option is for two students to work together taking turns reading to each other. Each student will practice reading with expression and the proper pace. The last option is for one student to practice reading aloud to a stuffed prairie dog animal using the microphone.</li></li></ul><li>Art Station Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  10. 10. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li> Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Missouri, The Environment, and Time (e.g., past, present, future). VA-SI04C03
  11. 11. Identify and use organic (freeform) shapes. VA-SII04B01
  12. 12. Number of students: 1-2
  13. 13. Activity explanation: This art activity is based on the book The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark by: Rhoda Blumberg. Students are to refer to pg 29 and observe the Jefferson Peace Medal. Peace Medals were a sign of friendship and were presented to Native Americans as a greeting on the expedition. Students will use construction paper, markers, and pipe cleaners to create their own peace medal that signifies friendship. The completed Peace Medals will be displayed around the room. </li></li></ul><li>Game Station Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  14. 14. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li> Identify and explain intended messages conveyed through oral and visual media CA-IL04A03
  15. 15. Demonstrate listening behaviors (e.g., prepares to listen, listens without interruptions, maintains eye contact) CA-LS04B01
  16. 16. Number of students: 3-5
  17. 17. Activity Explanation: At this station students will be playing Lewis and Clark Bingo. The game can be used as a review or as an introduction to the new information. One student will serve as the bingo card caller: shuffling and drawing the information cards to read aloud to the bingo players , and checking bingo winners cards. The other two students will use their large bingo card and play pieces to mark the selected pictures as the caller displays them. The first player to have a bingo yells, “O! the joy.” After a student gets a bingo, players can switch roles. This station will be graded on participation points and students will turn in a piece of paper with two sentences describing their experience playing in the Reflection Folder. </li></li></ul><li>Puppets Station Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  18. 18. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li> In discussions and presentations, present ideas in a logical sequence, and identify and apply appropriate speaking techniques such as volume control, pace and eye contact. CA-LS04A02
  19. 19. Express emotions and ideas to imitate life experiences. Improvise dialogue to tell stories, specific settings, and scenes TE-PP04B01
  20. 20. Identify vocal inflection and how it shows character in reading. TE-EP04B01
  21. 21. Number of students 2-3
  22. 22. Activity explanation: At this station students can act out a story, poem, or one of their own writings with the puppets provided. They can work together or individually </li></li></ul><li>Reading Station Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  23. 23. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li>Read grade-level instructional text with fluency, accuracy and expression. Adjusting reading rate to difficulty and type of text. CA-R04D01
  24. 24. During reading, utilize strategies to determine meaning of unknown words, self-monitor comprehension, question the text, infer, visualize, paraphrase, and summarize. CA-R04G01
  25. 25. Number of students: 1-2
  26. 26. Activity explanation: At the reading station students will have the option to read from a variety of text. While reading students will practice fluency and comprehension. The students may leave sticky notes in the books labeling explaining their favorite part or describing a personal connection. They may also buddy read using the visors and pointers, or read in a comfortable place in the room. Students can make recommendations for other students on the board, or write reviews be shared with classmates.  </li></li></ul><li>Writing Station Lewis & Clark<br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li> Identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; examples include Lewis and Clark, Mary Easton Sibley, John Berry Meacham, George Washington Carver, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Mark Twain, Harry S Truman and Thomas Hart Benton. SS043A-B SS3 1.10, 1.6
  27. 27. Sequence and describe the importance of Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. </li></ul>SS043A-H SS3 1.6, 1.8<br /><ul><li>Follow a writing process to independently use a simple prewriting strategy, generate a draft, reread, revise for audience and purpose, ideas and content, organization and sentence structure, and word choice. Edit for conventions and share writing. CA-W04A01
  28. 28. Compose text with a beginning, middle, and end. A logical sequence of events and sentence variety. CA-W04C02
  29. 29. Number of Students: 1
  30. 30. Activity explanation: At the writing station students can reflect on their reading, write a friendly letter to Lewis or Clark, create an original story as if they were apart of the exploration team, create a list of items they would need if they went on the trip, or from the point of view of Lewis or Clark-write about their first sighting of a grizzly bear or prairie dog. Lastly, students may study the painting of Lewis and Clark with Sacagawea and write to answer what they believe the explorers are thinking at that time of the expedition. </li></li></ul><li>The Writing Process<br />
  31. 31. Friendly Letter Form<br /> St27217 Fleece Lane<br /> Joplin, MO 64801<br />March 21, 2010<br />Dear Jeff,<br /> Greetings from camp! I hope you’re having a great day. I’ve had a fantastic trip. My favorite part of camping is the food! We have roasted marshmallows, hotdogs, and cooked hamburgers on the grill. I went fishing yesterday, and caught a 15 pound bass! We fried the fish for dinner, and it was delicious!<br />I’m having a wonderful time camping at Roaring River, but look forward to seeing you soon! I’m looking forward to your next letter!<br /> Your friend,<br />Ashleigh Terry<br />Return address<br />Greeting<br />Body<br />Complimentary Closing<br />
  32. 32. Writing Station<br />Puppet Station <br />Reading Station<br />
  33. 33. Writing Station<br />Puppet Station <br />Reading Station<br />
  34. 34. Listening Station<br />Art Station<br />Game Station<br />
  35. 35. Listening Station<br />Art Station<br />Game Station<br />
  36. 36. We Recommend <br />
  37. 37. Reflection Folder<br />Finished!<br />Still Working…<br />
  38. 38. Camping List<br />To-Do’s and Materials<br />1.________________________________ 9.___________________________________<br />2.________________________________ 10.___________________________________<br />3.________________________________ 12.___________________________________<br />4.________________________________ 13.___________________________________<br />5.________________________________ 14.____________________________________<br />6.________________________________ 15.____________________________________<br />7.________________________________ 16.___________________________________<br />8.________________________________ 17.___________________________________<br />
  39. 39. Camping List<br />To-Do’s and Materials<br />1.________________________________ 9.___________________________________<br />2.________________________________ 10.___________________________________<br />3.________________________________ 12.___________________________________<br />4.________________________________ 13.___________________________________<br />5.________________________________ 14.____________________________________<br />6.________________________________ 15.____________________________________<br />7.________________________________ 16.___________________________________<br />8.________________________________ 17.___________________________________<br />
  40. 40. Camping List<br />To-Do’s and Materials<br />1.________________________________ 9.___________________________________<br />2.________________________________ 10.___________________________________<br />3.________________________________ 12.___________________________________<br />4.________________________________ 13.___________________________________<br />5.________________________________ 14.____________________________________<br />6.________________________________ 15.____________________________________<br />7.________________________________ 16.___________________________________<br />8.________________________________ 17.___________________________________<br />
  41. 41. Wagon Trail What I Would Choose to Take with Me<br />1.________________________________ <br />2.________________________________ <br />3.________________________________<br />4.________________________________ <br />5.________________________________ <br />6.________________________________ <br />7.________________________________ <br />8.________________________________ <br />Draw a picture of the items you would take with you.<br />
  42. 42. Wagon Trail What I Would Choose to Take with Me<br />1.________________________________ <br />2.________________________________ <br />3.________________________________<br />4.________________________________ <br />5.________________________________ <br />6.________________________________ <br />7.________________________________ <br />8.________________________________ <br />Draw a picture of the items you would take with you.<br />
  43. 43. Wagon Trail What I Would Choose to Take with Me<br />1.________________________________ <br />2.________________________________ <br />3.________________________________<br />4.________________________________ <br />5.________________________________ <br />6.________________________________ <br />7.________________________________ <br />8.________________________________ <br />Draw a picture of the items you would take with you.<br />
  44. 44. Westward Expansion Station<br /><ul><li> The Westward Expansion materials will be displayed and used once I begin discussing Westward Expansion in class. This station serves as another avenue for students to study the various aspects of Westward Expansion through listening, art, puppets, games and writing activities. The materials needed for the station are in the storage container and a materials list has been provided. Students will need to clean up the station after use: they know the proper procedure.
  45. 45. Assessment at the station will mostly be participation points. I will observe students and check their names on a participation clipboard each day we use the station In order to receive positive participation marks in the listening, reading, puppets, and games stations students will need to remain on task and work well with others. Art projects will be turned in the “finished basket” or “still working” basket. Later, projects will be displayed in the room or hallway and written work will be assed for a grade based on content, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Once the time spent at the work station is complete, students will turn in a piece of paper with a two-three sentences describing what they worked on for the day and what they liked best. These papers will be placed in the Reflection Folder. </li></li></ul><li>Materials<br />Reading<br />Buddy reading visors<br />Sticky notes<br />Cork board<br />Various books<br />Two of the same book<br />( The Oregon Trial: The Diary of Callie Stokes)<br />Pillows<br />Blankets<br />Pop-up tent, to read in<br />Pencils<br />Pens<br />Paper <br />Pointers<br />Art<br />Mock raw-hide<br />Scissors<br />Glue<br />Markers<br />Construction paper<br />Popsicle sticks<br />Rubber bands<br />Toothpicks<br />Paint<br />Life in a Plains Camp<br />Pipe cleaners<br />Writing<br />Copy of a friendly letter<br />Paper <br />Pencils<br />Pens<br />Blank books<br />Variety of books<br />Envelopes<br />Copy of the Writing process<br />Wagon Trail list Stationary <br />Large Map<br />Listening<br />Stuffed black bear<br />Microphone<br />Native American Music CD<br />Paper<br />2 sets of headphones<br />Pens<br />Pencils <br />Crayons<br />Puppets<br />Books<br />Poems<br />Puppets<br />Games<br />Westward Expansion Memory game<br />Memory cards<br />
  46. 46. Listening Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  47. 47. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  48. 48. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  49. 49. Listen for enjoyment, information, directions to identify tone, mood and emotion of verbalandnonverbal communication. CA-LS04A01
  50. 50. In discussions and presentations, present ideas in a logical sequence as well as identify and apply appropriate speaking techniques such as volume control, pace and eye contact. CA-LS04A02
  51. 51. Number of Students: one-two
  52. 52. Activity explanation: At the listening station students will have the option to listen to a musical selection performed by Native Americans, listen to a partner read, or read aloud using a microphone to a stuffed black bear animal. While listening to the Native American music students may draw a picture of what they think the music represents. Another option is for two students to work together taking turns reading to each other. Each student will practice reading with expression and the proper pace. The last option is for one student to practice reading aloud to a stuffed black bear animal using the microphone. </li></li></ul><li>Art Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  53. 53. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  54. 54. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  55. 55. Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Missouri, The Environment, and Time (e.g., past, present, future). VA-SI04C03
  56. 56. Identify and use organic (freeform) shapes. VA-SII04B01
  57. 57. Number of Students: two- three
  58. 58. Explanation of activity: This art activity is based on the book Life in a Plains Camp by: Bobbie Kalman. Students are to refer to pg 7 and observe the illustration of the Tipi. The Tipi was a sort of tent that the Plains Indians lived in. The Plains Indians used buffalo –hides to create their Tipis and decorated the outside of the hide with symbols and pictures to tell a story. Students will use raw hides, paint, makers, sticks, and toothpicks to create their own Tipi. The completed Tipis will be displayed around the room. </li></li></ul><li>Game Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  59. 59. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  60. 60. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  61. 61. Identify and explain intended messages conveyed through oral and visual media CA-IL04A03
  62. 62. Demonstrate listening behaviors (e.g., prepares to listen, listens without interruptions, maintains eye contact) CA-LS04B01
  63. 63. Number of Students: 2
  64. 64. Activity explanation: At this station students will be playing “Westward Expansion Memory.” The game can be used as a review or an introduction to the new information. Students will shuffle and place all memory cards face down. Then they will take turns flipping over two cards trying to get them to “match up” with the same date, illustration, picture, or fact.” Once a student flips over two of the same card they keep the cards and take another turn until they flip over two mismatched cards. Now the other student will take their turn. Once all cards have been flipped, students compare cards to see who has the most matched pairs-this student wins.</li></li></ul><li>Puppets Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  65. 65. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  66. 66. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  67. 67. In discussions and presentations, present ideas in a logical sequence, and identify and apply appropriate speaking techniques such as volume control, pace and eye contact. CA-LS04A02
  68. 68. Express emotions and ideas to imitate life experiences. Improvise dialogue to tell stories, specific settings, and scenes TE-PP04B01
  69. 69. Identify vocal inflection and how it shows character in reading. TE-EP04B01
  70. 70. Number of students 2-3
  71. 71. Activity explanation: At this station students can act out a story, poem, or one of their own writings with the puppets provided. They can work together or individually </li></li></ul><li>Reading Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  72. 72. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  73. 73. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  74. 74. Read grade-level instructional text with fluency, accuracy and expression. Adjusting reading rate to difficulty and type of text. CA-R04D01
  75. 75. During reading, utilize strategies to determine meaning of unknown words, self-monitor comprehension, question the text, infer, visualize, paraphrase, and summarize. CA-R04G01
  76. 76. Number of students: 1-2
  77. 77. Activity explanation: At the reading station students will have the option to read from a variety of text. While reading students will practice fluency and comprehension. The students may leave sticky notes in the books labeling explaining their favorite part or describing a personal connection. They may also buddy read using the visors and pointers, or read in a comfortable place in the room. Students can make recommendations for other students on the board, or write reviews be shared with classmates.  </li></li></ul><li>Writing Station Westward Expansion <br />GLE’s:<br /><ul><li>Summarize the events in westward expansion, including people’s motivation, their hardships, and Missouri as a jumping-off point to the West. SS043A-F SS3 1.10
  78. 78. Compare and contrast the habitats, resources, art and daily lives of native American peoples, Woodland and Plains Indians. SS023A-G SS3 1.9
  79. 79. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on the Native American in Missouri. SS043A-I SS3 1.6
  80. 80. Follow a writing process to independently use a simple prewriting strategy, generate a draft, reread, revise for audience and purpose, ideas and content, organization and sentence structure, and word choice. Edit for conventions and share writing. CA-W04A01
  81. 81. Compose text with a beginning, middle, and end. A logical sequence of events and sentence variety. CA-W04C02
  82. 82. Number of Students: 1
  83. 83. Activity explanation: At the writing station students can reflect on their reading, write a friendly letter to a friend as if they were on the Oregon Trail, create an original story as if they stayed with a Native American tribe in a Tipi, make a list of items they would want to take with them if they left for the Oregon Trail, or write about the new animals they would have seen on the trail west. Lastly students can make a journal describing the hardships of the trail, or study the map and write about the location they think they would have settled while on the trip west. </li></li></ul><li>Buffalo <br />Hide<br />Buffalo Hide<br />Westward Ho!<br />
  84. 84. Brown Bear<br />Brown Bear<br />Chimney Rock<br />Chimney Rock<br />Native Americans<br />Native Americans<br />
  85. 85. Oregon Trail<br />RoCkYMoUnTaInS<br />RoCkYMoUnTaInS<br />1843<br />1843<br />
  86. 86. Rabbit Brush<br />Rabbit Brush<br />Oregon Trail <br />
  87. 87. This Month:<br /> The Lewis<br /> and <br />Clark Expedition<br />
  88. 88. This Month:<br />Westward<br />Expansion <br />
  89. 89. Scoreboard<br />
  90. 90. At the Reading Station I can…<br /><ul><li> Read a book by telling about the pictures
  91. 91. Tell my partner about the book I like
  92. 92. Write a response to a book I just read
  93. 93. Write a book review about a book I just read
  94. 94. Read a book from a read-aloud </li></li></ul><li>At the Puppet Station I can…<br /><ul><li> Read and retell a book
  95. 95. Use props to retell a book
  96. 96. Use puppets to retell a story
  97. 97. Read a play with a friend</li></li></ul><li>Puppet Tasks<br />Use the puppets to retell a story told aloud in class<br />Use the puppets to tell the story of a book<br />Use the puppets to tell an original story<br />Use the puppets to act out a poem<br />Puppet Tasks<br />Use the puppets to retell a story told aloud in class<br />Use the puppets to retell a book<br />Use the puppets to tell an original story<br />Use the puppets to act out a poem<br />
  98. 98. At the Art Station I can…<br /><ul><li> I can share materials with other students
  99. 99. I can create my own, original piece of artwork
  100. 100. I can use a book for a reference
  101. 101. I can work with a partner
  102. 102. I can use the information covered in class to help create my artwork</li></li></ul><li>Art Station Tasks<br />Create a peace medal with the materials provided <br />Look at pg. 29 in the book The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark for help<br />I can use as many of the art materials as I need to make my project<br />I can share with others<br />I can create a medal that symbolizes friendship<br />Art Station Tasks<br />Create a Tipi with the materials provided <br />Look at pg. 7 in the book Life in a Plains Camp for help<br />I can use as many of the art materials as I need to make my project<br />I can share with others<br />I can create a tipi that tells a story with pictures and symbols <br />
  103. 103. Reading Tasks<br />Buddy read Lewis and Clark: Journey across the Missouri River with a partner using the foam visors<br />Place a sticky note on the page with my favorite passage in the book<br />Use a pointer or bookmark while I read<br />Read in a comfortable place in the room<br />Read in the tent<br />Make a book recommendation for a friend<br />Create a book review<br />Reading Tasks<br />Buddy read The Oregon Trail: The Diary of Callie Stokes with a partner using the foam visors<br />Place a sticky note on the page with my favorite passage in the book<br />Use a pointer or bookmark while I read<br />Read in a comfortable place in the room<br />Read in the tent<br />Make a book recommendation for a friend<br />Create a book review<br />
  104. 104. At the Listening Station I can…<br /><ul><li> I can turn the page
  105. 105. Read along with the book
  106. 106. Talk to my partner about the CD when we’re finished listening
  107. 107. Draw a picture of my favorite part of the book
  108. 108. Write about something I learned by listening today
  109. 109. Retell the story about song I heard today</li></li></ul><li>;Listening Tasks<br />I can listen with a partner<br />Listen to the recorded Native American music<br />Draw a picture of what the music represented<br />Write a paragraph describing why I did or didn’t like the music<br />I can read aloud to a partner using the microphone<br />I can listen to a partner read aloud<br />I can read aloud to the black bear<br />;Listening Tasks<br />I can listen with a partner<br />Listen to the recorded book, The Legend of Spinoza and turn the pages<br />Draw a picture of what the story represented to me<br />Write a paragraph describing why I did or didn’t like the book<br />I can read aloud to a partner using the microphone<br />I can listen to a partner read aloud<br />I can read aloud to the prairie dog <br />
  110. 110. At the Game Station I can…<br /><ul><li> Put a puzzle together
  111. 111. Play a game
  112. 112. Cooperate with my partner
  113. 113. Write a note if pieces are missing</li></li></ul><li>Games Tasks<br />Play Lewis and Clark Bingo<br />Play fairly<br />Read the information cards <br />Keep score on the score board<br />Put together the U.S. puzzle<br />Games Tasks<br />Play Westward Expansion Memory <br />Play fairly<br />Read the information cards <br />Keep score on the score board<br />Put together the U.S. puzzle<br />
  114. 114. At the Writing Work Station I can…<br /><ul><li> I can reflect on my reading in writing
  115. 115. I can write a friendly letter
  116. 116. I can read my writing and listen for stops so I can put periods and questions marks where they belong
  117. 117. I can create an original story
  118. 118. I can make a list of items I would need for a trip
  119. 119. I can write from someone else’s point of view
  120. 120. I can look back at and use the writing process</li></li></ul><li>Writing Tasks<br />Write a friendly letter to a friend as if you were on the Oregon Trial<br />Create an original story as if you stayed with a Native American tripe in a tipi<br />Make a list of items you would take with you on the trial<br />Write about new animals you would have seen on the trail<br />Write in a journal describing the hardships you might have encountered on the trial<br />Study the map, and write about the location you think you and your family would have settled<br />Writing Tasks<br />Write a friendly letter to Lewis and Clark<br />Create an original story as if you were apart of the exploration team<br />Make a list of items you would take with you the expedition <br />Write about new animals you would have seen on the expedition<br />Write in a journal describing the hardships you might have encountered on the expedition <br />Study the painting of Lewis and Clark standing with Sacagawea and write what you believe they explores are thinking <br />

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