www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
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www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
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www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
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www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
P...
www.minedu.govt.nz
© New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector.
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Next+steps+in+learning

  1. 1. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 1 Shared clarity about the next steps in learning
  2. 2. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 2 ‘Next steps’ is about the direction or the plan that the teacher and students need to have about where the learning is headed. It is about what the teacher needs to do in order to effectively communicate the direction to the students. It addresses the question, ‘After we have learnt this, what do we learn next?’. ‘Next steps’ is what the students need to be able to do to play their part in ensuring that the teaching and learning has direction for them.
  3. 3. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 3 You can use this presentation to: • update, review and/or reflect on how ‘Next steps’ is developed in your classroom or school • use as a resource for exploring professional development in Next Steps in Learning • clarify the purpose and value of sharing ‘big picture’ relevance • identify strategies and resources for developing next steps with students
  4. 4. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 4 “But it is important to remember that it is the pupils who will take the next steps and the more they are involved in the process, the greater will be their understanding of how to extend their learning.” Assessment Reform Group (1999) p.8
  5. 5. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 5 Where ‘next steps’ fits in • When sharing the ‘big picture’ relevance of the learning • ‘Feed forward’ when promoting further learning (oral/written) • Self or peer assessment against success criteria • Reflection time • Learning conversations about assessment results
  6. 6. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 6 The indicators of ‘next step’ capability • Starting with the end in mind • Excellent knowledge of subject and its learning progressions • Identity with and enthusiasm for the subject • ‘Where to next’ resources which show student learning progressions
  7. 7. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 7 Starting with the end in mind • For students to understand where they are headed with their learning, teachers should constantly share with them the ‘big picture’ of learning, at the beginning of each unit of work and throughout the progression of the learning. • This enables students to monitor their progress against defined benchmarks or progressions.
  8. 8. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 8 Excellent curriculum knowledge • The role of the teacher is to be the expert in the subject. This requires excellent curriculum knowledge, and keeping current through new research, new technologies and new ideas. • The more the teacher is excited and enthusiastic about the subject, the greater the possibility that students will be too.
  9. 9. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 9 Identity with the subject • The more the teacher is excited and enthusiastic about the subject, the greater the possibility that students will be too. • A challenge for teachers is to build student identity with the subject so the students see themselves as ‘writers, mathematicians, and scientists.’
  10. 10. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 10 Progressions of learning • Progressions of learning can be displayed in the classroom. An example is pieces of writing at successive curriculum levels, against which students can monitor their achievement. • Students and teacher can construct ‘where to next’ through the use of exemplars, matrices or progressions. • The more students are involved in the process of identifying next steps, the greater their understanding will be of how to extend their learning.
  11. 11. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 11 What students need… • A clear idea of what they are learning – the big picture • A clear idea of where they are currently at in their learning • A sense of progression for the next steps • The above should be explicit and exemplified
  12. 12. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 12 A Challenge Create a resource to use with your students to show them where they are with their learning, and what their next steps are. You could create this resource for any curriculum area.
  13. 13. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 13 Some examples: • Levelled exemplars to display on the wall • Planning enlarged and on the wall • Student-speak indicators • Visual displays • Processes for focused student goal setting • Modelling books • NCEA prescriptions in student speak
  14. 14. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 14
  15. 15. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 15
  16. 16. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 16
  17. 17. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 17
  18. 18. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 18
  19. 19. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 19
  20. 20. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 20 53 – 29 = “I use tidy numbers: 53 – 30 (29 + 1) = 23 plus 1 = 24.” “I use place value: e.g. 53 – 20 – 9. 53 – 20 = 33. Minus another 9. Split the 9 into 3 and 6. 33 – 3 = 30 – 6 = 24.” Subtraction Strategies Children at Stage 6 use two of these strategies “I use balancing: 53 – 29 = +1 +1 54 – 30 = 24.” “I use reversibility and count up on a number line.” +1 +20 +3 ________________________ 29 30 50 53 53 +1 +1 29 Pupil self assessment Name: _______________________________ I use the ___________ strategy I am learning to use the ___________ strategy
  21. 21. www.minedu.govt.nz © New Zealand Ministry of Education 2009 - copying restricted to use by New Zealand education sector. Page 21 References and readings • Absolum, M. (2006). Clarity in the classroom. Auckland: Hodder Education. pp. 165-173

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