Ece141day3class

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Ece141day3class

  1. 1. Math & Science for Young Children ECE 141 / 111F winter quarter 2011 Emily McMason Night 3 units 6-10
  2. 2. <ul><li>I want to apologize. </li></ul><ul><li>I didn’t like how fast we </li></ul><ul><li>did the tangerine analysis </li></ul><ul><li>last week. I wanted it to </li></ul><ul><li>be a series of teachable </li></ul><ul><li>moments that unfolded </li></ul><ul><li>leisurely and allowed for </li></ul><ul><li>me to ask divergent </li></ul><ul><li>questions. </li></ul>OOPS.
  3. 3. <ul><li>I want to apologize. </li></ul><ul><li>Our class is so large </li></ul><ul><li>(which is great!) that I </li></ul><ul><li>Will be working on how </li></ul><ul><li>To manage our time in </li></ul><ul><li>different ways. But I </li></ul><ul><li>don’t want to create such </li></ul><ul><li>a structured environment </li></ul><ul><li>that we don’t have time </li></ul><ul><li>and space for the really </li></ul><ul><li>important organic </li></ul><ul><li>questions </li></ul><ul><li>And discussions. </li></ul>OOPS.
  4. 4. Homework Due <ul><li>Come on up and see if I can get your name correctly. </li></ul><ul><li>Get your folder, take out activity 1 analysis and place in it Activity #2, please. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Let’s discuss activity #1 <ul><li>First, the format. </li></ul><ul><li>I don’t have these crow’s feet. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Let’s discuss activity #1 <ul><li>First, the format. </li></ul><ul><li>Nor do I have these Crow’s feet. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Let’s discuss activity #1 <ul><li>First, the format. </li></ul><ul><li>I do, however, have these crow’s feet. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>What does that mean? I was not born yesterday, I am not naïve, I was a student, too. </li></ul><ul><li>What does that mean for you? Don’t double space (or space and a half), don’t use huge font, don’t create enormous margins, don’t put in so many returns after your name that your analysis begins half way down the page. Okay? These things make me grumpy. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>And when I am grumpy, I don’t grade in a very generous manner. </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Format <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>A full page, single-spaced document chock full of your insightful, reflective writing analyzing your activity and its relevance to our reading from the text. </li></ul>
  11. 11. The Filling <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph 1: a clear, thoughtful synopsis of ALL the units assigned for the week, not just those from the unit that ties with your activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s an example… </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Filling <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph 2: a complete description of the activity and how children will participate in it. Including a statement about where you found the activity or whether you created it. </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s an example… </li></ul>
  13. 13. The Filling <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph 3: Almost like a call and response form of dance. In unit __ on page ___, the authors discuss ___ which is directly mirrored in my activity when the students do __. </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s an example… </li></ul>
  14. 14. The Filling <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph 4: Justification of age range, which should cover either 1 year of school or 2 years of age (ex: 2 nd grade or 7-8 year olds). If you are teaching 3 & 4 year olds, showing it fits for preoperational stage isn’t enough- that is a huge range (2 to 7) and what works for a 2 year old will flop for a 7 year old and vice versa. You will most likely need to quote multiple pages from our text to make your case. This may be the hardest part of your analysis! </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s an example… </li></ul>
  15. 15. The Topping <ul><li>What should it be? </li></ul><ul><li>If you plan to go for perfect, you need to either discuss how to adapt it for other children (and justify your choices with support from our text) and / or actually do the activity with children. </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s an example… </li></ul>
  16. 16. For Next Time… <ul><li>You will be writing another analysis for activity 3. Now that you have had a first try and my feedback, the grading will be more exacting – essentially, if you made no improvements from the first one, your grade would go down 1-2 points. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Why does your work need to be on time? </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>Why don’t I offer extra credit? </li></ul>
  19. 19. Totally changing gears…
  20. 20. <ul><li>Wow. What great </li></ul><ul><li>discussion posts on angel! </li></ul><ul><li>(so great I neglected my </li></ul><ul><li>daughter). </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>Wonderful references to </li></ul><ul><li>the book (especially citing </li></ul><ul><li>page numbers). </li></ul><ul><li>Great intro to new vocabulary ‘polymer’ and ‘surfactant’. </li></ul><ul><li>Fabulous to do the activity with kids! </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Please- </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write 1 sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write 3 sentences that say the same thing over and over. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Encyclopedia Prehistorica Dinosaurs Robert Sabuda & Matthew Reinhart
  24. 24. <ul><li>Take 60 seconds to look around this room, all of the walls, all of the desks, your classmates, everything. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
  25. 25. <ul><li>Close your eyes and take three deep breaths to cement the images in your mind. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
  26. 26. <ul><li>Open your eyes. </li></ul><ul><li>Without looking around, please write down a description of: </li></ul><ul><li>The back wall, the number of windows, the color bag of the person sitting behind you, who is sitting in the back row, the color of the hair of the person directly behind you, the shape of the moon the last time you saw it in the sky. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
  27. 27. <ul><li>We just worked on enhancing your (child) awareness.  </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
  28. 28. Any Questions from the reading?
  29. 29. Units 6 -10 <ul><li>How young scientists use concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Planning for science </li></ul><ul><li>One-to-one correspondence </li></ul><ul><li>Number sense and counting </li></ul><ul><li>Logic and classifying </li></ul>
  30. 30. Unit 6 <ul><li>How young scientists use concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Discrepant events – students enter disequilibrium and are prepared to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Balloon skewer! </li></ul>
  31. 31. Unit 8 <ul><li>One-to-one correspondence </li></ul><ul><li>Builds in complexity </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Eleanor’s birthday party patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s look at how she created them </li></ul>
  32. 32. Units 9 & 10 <ul><li>Number sense and counting </li></ul><ul><li>Logic and classifying </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s watch and see what a 4 year old does with a naturalistic / informal activity: </li></ul>
  33. 33. Logical grouping / classifying: color
  34. 34. Logical grouping / classifying: size & type of animal
  35. 35. Logical grouping / classifying: 2 sizes sorted & type of animal
  36. 36. Logical grouping / classifying: 2 sizes, type of animal, color & pattern
  37. 37. Logical grouping / classifying: applied all of the rules to new set of animals right away
  38. 39. Discrepant event: extra space
  39. 40. More extra space
  40. 41. Rational counting, cardinality & centration
  41. 42. <ul><li>Activity #2…gather into your groups and share what you found. Actively participate in person -’s activity. </li></ul>Gather in your Groups
  42. 43. <ul><li>Count off into 5 groups starting with the number 6.  </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  43. 44. <ul><li>Count off into 5 groups starting with the number 6.  </li></ul><ul><li>Grab your notebook & textbook and gather with your fellow numbers. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  44. 45. <ul><li>Send someone up from your group to grab a set of supplies. </li></ul><ul><li>Have at least 2 people who are researching terms & concepts in the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Determine who will be your group recorder. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  45. 46. <ul><li>Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following: </li></ul><ul><li>How will you enhance child awareness with these materials? </li></ul><ul><li>What kind of ‘Teacher Magic’ might happen with these materials? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you address it? </li></ul><ul><li>What discrepant event can you deliberately create to jar students from equilibrium into disequilibrium? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you assess that they have reached both accommodation and assimilation? </li></ul><ul><li>Does your plan include all steps of the learning cycle? </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 6: How Young Scientists Use Concepts
  46. 47. <ul><li>Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 6: How Young Scientists Use Concepts
  47. 48. <ul><li>Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set. </li></ul><ul><li>Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone else who will be your group recorder. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  48. 49. <ul><li>Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following: </li></ul><ul><li>How will you integrate this into the curriculum? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you address multiple learning styles? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you want students to learn? Web the concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Pick at least 10 action verbs to be used by students </li></ul><ul><li>Write an outline for your lesson plan. </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm at least 3 assessment activities. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 7: Planning for Science
  49. 50. <ul><li>Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 7: Planning for Science
  50. 51. <ul><li>Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set. </li></ul><ul><li>Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone else who will be your group recorder. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  51. 52. <ul><li>Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following: </li></ul><ul><li>How can you assess if a child understands rational counting? </li></ul><ul><li>Using your materials create a </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Naturalistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Structured </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Activity for teaching 1 to 1 correspondence. </li></ul></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 8: One-to-One Correspondence
  52. 53. <ul><li>Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 8: One-to-One Correspondence
  53. 54. <ul><li>Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set. </li></ul><ul><li>Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone else who will be your group recorder. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  54. 55. <ul><li>Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following: </li></ul><ul><li>How can you assess if a child understands counting (both rote and rational)? </li></ul><ul><li>Use your materials to create a story to engage a child’s imagination around counting (think Goldilocks, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Using your story create a Naturalistic, Informal and Structured activity for teaching counting. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 9: Number Sense and Counting
  55. 56. <ul><li>Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 9: Number Sense and Counting
  56. 57. <ul><li>Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set. </li></ul><ul><li>Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text. </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone else who will be your group recorder. </li></ul><ul><li>(by now hopefully everyone has had every job!) </li></ul>Theory -> Practice
  57. 58. <ul><li>Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Create a total of 11 quick exercises. Divide them roughly into an equal number of sorting and grouping activities. The activities should cover these classifications: color, shape, size, material, pattern, texture, function, association, class name, common features, and number. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure you have covered Naturalistic, Informal, and Structured types of activities in the 11 quick exercises. If not, adjust. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 10: Logic & Classifying
  58. 59. <ul><li>Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class. </li></ul>Theory -> Practice Unit 10: Logic & Classifying
  59. 60. <ul><li>If We Have Time… </li></ul>
  60. 61. <ul><li>Upcoming Major Assignment due 2/9 </li></ul><ul><li>B. Science and Math Library B & C together are 20% grade </li></ul><ul><li>Find and read 10 books that you would like to include in your Math and Science Library. </li></ul>
  61. 62. <ul><li>These books should be attractive in story, pace, pictures and words. They should also teach or expose the reader to math and/or science concepts. You do not need to purchase the books, therefore utilizing the library or browsing your local bookstore is fine. </li></ul>
  62. 63. <ul><li>Your books need to be age appropriate, and thus be geared for children ages 0-8. At least 2 need to be appropriate for infants [ages 0-1]; 2 for toddlers [ages 2-3] ; 2 for preschoolers [ages 4-5]; 2 for early elementary schoolers [ages 6-7]; and 2 for 8 years old and up. In addition, half should focus on math and the other half on science. </li></ul>
  63. 64. <ul><li>Write an abstract [using the Writing to Publish Format] for each book, including: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Title, Author, publisher, and ISBN number </li></ul><ul><li>2. A summary of the story </li></ul><ul><li>3. Identification of the math and/or science concepts and vocabulary that the story or pictures present </li></ul><ul><li>4. Description of the age that is appropriate for this book and why [see ‘concepts and skills’ page 3], ‘standards for school mathematics’ pages 7-11, and Appendix A Developmental Assessment Tasks, page 583 </li></ul>
  64. 65. Last Year… <ul><li>C. Book Presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Bring your favorite children’s book from assignment B to class and share it. You will read it to the class, then ask classmates to identify the math and/or science concepts. Introduce a math /science activity that ties to the book, and facilitate a discussion with your classmates about how to build the connection between the two. </li></ul>
  65. 66. <ul><li>If We Have Time… </li></ul>
  66. 67. <ul><li>Have each group set up their favorite activity that they created, have other groups rotate through and explore the invented activities. </li></ul>

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