EXAMINING ACHIEVEMENT ANDSATISFACTION USING COOPERATIVE &COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES INBLENDED & ONLINE ENVIRONMENTSDr. Chris...
Problem   Increase in online and blended courses   Call for students to collaborate   Instructional Designers & instruc...
Research Literature  Cooperative Learning           Collaborative LearningMore structure                  Less structure M...
ECI 430/530   Instructional Technology Integration course   Redesigned module to include group project:    lesson plan w...
ECI 430/530   4 groups:                Blended                 OnlineCooperative     Blended Cooperative     Online Coope...
ECI 430/530   Various Education students       Undergraduate and Master’s level       Age range under 20 to over 50    ...
Treatment1.   Take pre-treatment survey2.   Read assigned module content3.   Meet with group on discussion board or chat a...
Research Questions   Do course delivery method (blended vs. online)    and learning strategy (cooperative vs.    collabor...
Individual AchievementDo learning strategy & course delivery methoddifferentially impact students’ individualachievement?...
Group Achievement   Do learning strategy & course delivery method    differentially impact students’ group project    gra...
Group Achievement       Performed a stepped ANCOVA       Significant interaction F(1,183) = 21.36, p<.001, partial η2 =....
Group Achievement   ANCOVA, accounting for low & moderate    participation students       Significant interaction: F(1,1...
Process & Solution SatisfactionDo learning strategy and course deliverymethod differentially impact students’satisfaction ...
Community of InquiryDo learning strategy and course delivery method differentiallyimpact students’ perceptions of teaching...
Teaching PresenceTP subscale: Design & Organization     Significant interaction, F(1,178) = 5.002, p<.05, η2=.027
Conclusions   Cooperative & collaborative learning equally    effective for lower-level, individual achievement   Group ...
Read more here…Nickel, C.E. & Overbaugh, R.C. (2012). Cooperativeand Collaborative Strategies in Blended and OnlineLearnin...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Examining Achievement and Satisfaction Using Cooperative & Collaborative Strategies in Blended & Online Environments

353 views

Published on

Presentation by Christine Nickel
for the 2012 Distance Teaching and Learning Conference, Madison, WI

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Examining Achievement and Satisfaction Using Cooperative & Collaborative Strategies in Blended & Online Environments

  1. 1. EXAMINING ACHIEVEMENT ANDSATISFACTION USING COOPERATIVE &COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES INBLENDED & ONLINE ENVIRONMENTSDr. Christine NickelRegent University
  2. 2. Problem Increase in online and blended courses Call for students to collaborate Instructional Designers & instructors – want to use group work, but how best to do it?  Blended or online?  Cooperative (more structure) or collaborative (less structure)?
  3. 3. Research Literature Cooperative Learning Collaborative LearningMore structure Less structure More teacher controlled More learner controlled• Assigned roles (division of • No assigned roles (studentslabor) negotiate solutions together)• Scaffolded teamwork skills • Teamwork skills are• Group Processing promoted assumedby instructor • Group processing is not promoted
  4. 4. ECI 430/530 Instructional Technology Integration course Redesigned module to include group project: lesson plan with integrated technology Course sections assigned to:  Cooperative: division of labor, scaffolding, group processing  Collaborative: no division of labor, scaffolding or group processing
  5. 5. ECI 430/530 4 groups: Blended OnlineCooperative Blended Cooperative Online CooperativeCollaborative Blended Collaborative Online Collaborative
  6. 6. ECI 430/530 Various Education students  Undergraduate and Master’s level  Age range under 20 to over 50  Varying experience with online learning 18 course sections (9 blended, 9 online), 254 students Course delivery method self-selected Learning strategy randomly assigned to course sections
  7. 7. Treatment1. Take pre-treatment survey2. Read assigned module content3. Meet with group on discussion board or chat and discuss quiz review questions4. As a group, create a lesson plan that uses group learning strategies5. Complete the lesson as a group but submit individually6. Individually, take module quiz7. Take post-treatment survey
  8. 8. Research Questions Do course delivery method (blended vs. online) and learning strategy (cooperative vs. collaborative) differentially impact…  Individual achievement and group achievement  Process and solution satisfaction  Also examined:  Community of Inquiry perceptions
  9. 9. Individual AchievementDo learning strategy & course delivery methoddifferentially impact students’ individualachievement?Quiz worth 15 points; Bloom’s remembering &understanding levelsPerformed a stepped ANCOVANo interaction, no main effects
  10. 10. Group Achievement Do learning strategy & course delivery method differentially impact students’ group project grades? Rubric, worth 30 points M SD Blended Delivery Method (n=95) Cooperative 25.46 2.93 Collaborative 28.32 1.10 Online Delivery Method (n=101) Cooperative 27.27 1.96 Collaborative 27.53 1.88
  11. 11. Group Achievement Performed a stepped ANCOVA Significant interaction F(1,183) = 21.36, p<.001, partial η2 =.105  Age and academic level also significant Blended cooperative – division of work without showing work on group discussion board? Issues with rubric?
  12. 12. Group Achievement ANCOVA, accounting for low & moderate participation students  Significant interaction: F(1,176) = 11.584, p<.001, partial η2= .065  Blended cooperative - still lower group project grades  Age & academic level significantly influence DV
  13. 13. Process & Solution SatisfactionDo learning strategy and course deliverymethod differentially impact students’satisfaction scores?Adapted from Green & Taber (1980)Stepped MANCOVA  No interaction, no main effects
  14. 14. Community of InquiryDo learning strategy and course delivery method differentiallyimpact students’ perceptions of teaching presence, socialpresence, and cognitive presence in the project-based learningactivity?Stepped MANCOVA Estimated Marginal Means for Teaching Presence  Main effect for course delivery Wilks’ Λ = .93, F(3,176) = 4.312, p<.01, partial η2=.068  Significant covariates: value of connectedness, recognition of collaboration potential, process satisfaction, solution satisfaction
  15. 15. Teaching PresenceTP subscale: Design & Organization  Significant interaction, F(1,178) = 5.002, p<.05, η2=.027
  16. 16. Conclusions Cooperative & collaborative learning equally effective for lower-level, individual achievement Group achievement significantly influenced by course delivery method and learning strategy Course delivery method and learning strategy do not significantly impact process and solution satisfaction. Blended cooperative students have lower perceptions of the design of the module
  17. 17. Read more here…Nickel, C.E. & Overbaugh, R.C. (2012). Cooperativeand Collaborative Strategies in Blended and OnlineLearning Environments. In Z. Akyol & R. Garrison(eds.), Educational communities of inquiry:Theoretical framework, research and practice.http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/cooperative-collaborBook available in September.

×