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Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort

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Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort for New Learning Models by Focusing on Teacher Readiness and Personalize Professional Learning

Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort for New Learning Models by Focusing on Teacher Readiness and Personalize Professional Learning

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Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort

  1. 1. Julie A. Evans, Ed.D., CEO, Project Tomorrow David Gomez, Instructional Coach, Project Tomorrow Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort for New Learning Models by Focusing on Teacher Readiness and Personalized Professional Learning DLAC – February 8, 2022
  2. 2. Getting to know each other! Introduce yourself to someone you do not know and say hi!
  3. 3. About Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org) ▪ Nonprofit education organization supporting K-12 education since 1996 through research, professional learning and school-based programs ▪ Mission is to support the development of new capacities and better decisions within the K-12 ecosystem ▪ Programs and research focus on role of innovation and new learning models within education, notably around digital learning. We believe in the power of transformational teaching and learning to support students’ preparation for future success.
  4. 4. About the Speak Up Research Project ▪ Annual research project since 2003 ▪ We provide education leaders with a suite of normed online surveys to collect valid feedback from their stakeholders ▪ All preK-12 schools – public, private, parochial, charter, virtual - are eligible to use the Speak Up tools ▪ Participating entities get summary reports with all locally collected data + state and national data for benchmarks ▪ Turnkey service provided by Project Tomorrow with no charge/fee to participating districts ▪ National reports inform education, business and policy decisions on K-12 education
  5. 5. Creating a community around today’s discussion Join us on Twitter: @JulieEvans_PT @ProjectTomorrow #DLAC22
  6. 6. ▪ Getting to know each other ▪ Thinking about a new formula for professional learning ▪ Introducing you to a new model of professional learning ✔How we are using this model in a teacher project in NYC ✔Key components of this new model ▪ Review of three model components: Teacher readiness Personalized professional learning plans In-classroom coaching ▪ Next steps for us with this new model / next steps for you ▪ Let’s talk! Your comments, ideas and questions Our time together today
  7. 7. ▪ Learn about a new professional learning approach that helps teachers build competency, confidence and comfort with new learning models ▪ Understand the connection between teacher readiness and efficacy with professional learning ▪ Pick up new ideas to inspire your professional learning plans ▪ Gain new insights about the research and professional learning work of Project Tomorrow Learning outcomes
  8. 8. About Project Tomorrow initiatives and research work To learn more about this project and/or to get a copy of today’s presentation sent directly to you, add your name and contact info to our print sign in sheets or on this online form.
  9. 9. Group discussion Think about types of professional learning you have experienced in your career. What were the characteristics of the best professional learning experiences you have had?
  10. 10. Group discussion Format, experiences and characteristics Specifically think about: ▪ How did those experiences motivate you to adopt a new idea or change existing practices? ▪ Did you realize an immediate impact from the learning experience? ▪ Did the experience help you develop capacity for future learning?
  11. 11. What we hear from educators Attributes or characteristics of the best professional learning experiences: ✓Personalized ✓Contextually relevant ✓Tangible ✓Self-affirming and collaborative ✓Actionable
  12. 12. Evidence: teachers’ preferences for professional learning formats are evolving to embrace new models 13% 23% 41% 16% 28% 52% 63% 31% 34% 39% 39% 40% 50% 59% Online course TEDTalks / learn via videos In-service days in school/district Online webinars/virtual conferences Professional learning community In-school coaching and mentoring Hands on workshops at F2F conferences Teachers 2022 Teachers 2018 Teachers’ professional learning model preferences : 2018 vs. 2022 Speak Up Research data 2018 and 2022
  13. 13. Evidence: teachers are also embracing self-directed professional learning experiences that address their preferences and needs Speak Up Research data 2022 What types of professional learning activities are you engaging with on your own to enhance your classroom efficacy? ▪ Seeking information and resources online (75% of teachers) ▪ Purchasing lesson plans and materials from teacher sharing sites (60%) ▪ Following experts and thought leaders on social media (50%) ▪ Finding and participating in online webinars and virtual conferences (41%) ▪ Listening to podcasts on subjects of interest (39%)
  14. 14. How do teachers adopt and adapt new learning practices within the classroom? Thinking beyond preferences for professional learning
  15. 15. Thinking about adoption processes 1. Teachers use technology outside of school in personal life Setting: Teacher uses technology to support personal life activities and goals Tools: Email, smartphone, social media Impact: More effective way to do things they are already doing (shopping, engaging with friends, communications) Value: Saves time, more efficient, expanded reach 2. Teachers use technology in school to support professional tasks with colleagues Setting: Teacher uses technology to support communications and engagement with professional peers and colleagues Tools: Email, smartphone, social media, school portals Impact: More effective way to do things they are already doing (exchanging info with other teachers, getting office announcements, seeking help with lessons) Value: Saves time, more efficient, expanded reach 3. Teachers use technology in school to engage students in learning Setting: Teacher uses technology to periodically engage students in learning with video clips, website access or use of a digital device Tools: Internet, digital devices, websites Impact: Students appear to be more engaged in learning when technology is used within lessons or learning activities Value: Increases student engagement Technology adoption as an example of the importance of personal valuation in the process of capacity building
  16. 16. Evidence: teachers’ comfort level with new learning models (and thus realization of benefits) lags resource availability and training Speak Up Research data 2020-21 Teachers with a higher degree of comfort and confidence with this usage of technology compared to their peers who report a lack of comfort and confidence: ✓ 2X as likely to say that effective technology use in the classroom helps students develop future-ready skills ✓ 2X as likely to say that they are better able to personalize learning for their students because of technology use ✓ Almost 2X as likely to say that technology can help address equity issues in education ✓ With no difference in terms of availability of technology between teachers of varying comfort levels Only 29% of teachers say they are very comfortable using technology to differentiate instruction in their classroom
  17. 17. Challenges with traditional professional learning about new instructional models: ▪ Overemphasis on skill development ▪ Lack of understanding the “why” of the usage ▪ Insufficient attention paid to the emotional components of change
  18. 18. “Change uses external influences to modify actions, but transformation modifies beliefs, so actions become natural and thereby achieve the desired result.” https://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/expert-voices/the-difference- between-change-and-transformation
  19. 19. Attributes or characteristics of the best professional learning experiences: ✓Personalized ✓Contextually relevant ✓Tangible ✓Self-affirming and collaborative ✓Actionable Formula for new models of professional learning
  20. 20. Formula for new models of professional learning Key attributes and characteristics plus what we know about efficacy with professional learning ▪ Create scaffolding for building personal valuation ▪ Meet teachers where they are and align professional learning with their current adoption step ▪ Nurture a growth mindset ▪ Plan for ongoing capacity building and longer-term sustainability
  21. 21. Pause … What are your comments, ideas and questions? Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort for New Learning Models by Focusing on Teacher Readiness and Personalized Professional Learning
  22. 22. ▪ Getting to know each other ▪ Thinking about a new formula for professional learning ▪ Introducing you to a new model of professional learning ✔How we are using this model in a teacher project in NYC ✔Key components of this new model ▪ Review of three model components: Teacher readiness Personalized professional learning plans In-classroom coaching ▪ Next steps for us with this new model / next steps for you ▪ Let’s talk! Your comments, ideas and questions Our time together today
  23. 23. Project Description: ▪ Goal is to test and evaluate a new model of teacher professional learning ▪ Structure personalized coaching based upon an individual teacher’s readiness for targeted professional learning ▪ Implementation of a new learning model = computational thinking as a problem solving strategy ▪ Focus is to help teachers build not only competency but also confidence and comfort with the new learning model integration within their core curriculum ▪ Studying impact of this professional learning model on teacher effectiveness and student outcomes ▪ Development of a sustainable model that grows capacity schoolwide About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  24. 24. Many thanks! About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  25. 25. Project Description: ▪10 elementary schools in New York City serving students of color and need ▪120 teachers, primarily assigned to grades 3, 4 and 5 ▪ Teachers have minimal prior familiarity to CS or CT concepts or integration About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  26. 26. Pause … Computational thinking? About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  27. 27. Computational Thinking = problem-solving strategy using these 4 components Decomposition Pattern Recognition Abstraction Algorithm Design
  28. 28. Why computational thinking integration is a good test environment for this professional learning model: ▪ Confusion about how to define CT within an elementary classroom context ▪ Teachers’ lack of knowledge about CT ▪ Teachers’ fears and uncertainty about valuation on changing instructional practices ▪ Relationship between technology skills and adoption of new teaching strategies ▪ Second order barriers including teachers’ self-efficacy around CT abilities About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  29. 29. Key components of our professional learning model 1. Understanding individual teacher readiness through an assessment tool 2. Development of a personalized professional learning plan that aligns to the teachers’ readiness 3. 1:1/small group coaching and mentoring on tangible integration strategies 4. Focus on integration within core curriculum, not a separate activity 5. Professional online learning community for shared experiential learning 6. Build school capacity by seeding a schoolwide culture that aligns with school values About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  30. 30. Key components of our professional learning model 1. Understanding individual teacher readiness through an assessment tool 2. Development of a personalized professional learning plan that aligns to the teachers’ readiness 3. 1:1/small group coaching and mentoring on tangible integration strategies 4. Focus on integration within core curriculum, not a separate activity 5. Professional online learning community for shared experiential learning 6. Build school capacity by seeding a schoolwide culture that aligns with school values About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  31. 31. Teacher readiness Research is emerging on this topic. Key points being made include: ▪ Changing environment and tools = need for new innovative thinking about instructional practices ▪ Innovative activity readiness formation ▪ In periods of innovative transformation, increasing specialization of teachers ▪ New understanding regarding teacher motivation and satisfaction with the profession ▪ Metacognitive practices that support teachers’ awareness of their needs ▪ High degree of emotional intelligence regarding self and students ▪ Premium on creativity skill development ▪ Differentiating passive vs. active professional learning
  32. 32. How we are evaluating teacher readiness for computational thinking integration in their classroom Our readiness variables: ✓Familiarity with computational thinking and the integration of CT within instruction ✓Valuation of CT as important for all students ✓Adoption of technology in their classroom ✓Level of comfort and confidence with integrating CT within their practice ✓Demonstrated support for student-student collaborations and also peer-peer educator collaborations
  33. 33. Understanding individual teacher readiness to inform personalized professional learning (PPL) plan Teachers’ Readiness to Adopt and Adapt CT (TRAACT) Spectrum and Assessment Tools Levels of Use Stages of Concern Incremental Intentional Impact Innovation Awareness A-1 A-2 Valuation V-1 V-2 V-3 Management M-1 M-2 M-3 M-4 Collaboration C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4 Refocusing R-1 R-2
  34. 34. Understanding individual teacher readiness to inform personalized professional learning (PPL) plan Teachers’ Readiness to Adopt and Adapt CT (TRAACT) Spectrum and Assessment Tools
  35. 35. Key components of our professional learning model 1. Understanding individual teacher readiness through an assessment tool 2. Development of a personalized professional learning plan that aligns to the teachers’ readiness 3. 1:1/small group coaching and mentoring on tangible integration strategies 4. Focus on integration within core curriculum, not a separate activity 5. Professional online learning community for shared experiential learning 6. Build school capacity by seeding a schoolwide culture that aligns with school values About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  36. 36. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Instructional coach reviews teacher responses on the TRAACT assessment that align with these variables: ▪ Technology usage and comfort ▪ CT familiarity and comfort with concepts ▪ Existing classroom activities ▪ Instructional technology and CT outlook for students ▪ Integration concerns ▪ Levels of staff and student collaboration
  37. 37. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Consideration is given to the following questions: ▪ How familiar is the teacher with CT concepts? ▪ How do the selected classroom activities support their self-assessed knowledge? ▪ How is the teacher currently using technology in their classroom? ▪ What frequency is the teacher using CT integrated instruction currently? ▪ What concerns do teachers have about CT integrated instruction? Are these lower-level logistical concerns or higher-level instructional concerns?
  38. 38. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Administrator input ▪ During check in with administrators they will often share each teacher’s overall instructional strengths and areas of growth based on their current observation data. ▪ This data is often captured from the lens of existing observation measurement tools such as the NYC DOE Teaching Framework. Classroom observation ▪ Prior to our first meeting I complete a classroom walk-through to get a sense for instruction, teacher’s preferences, etc.
  39. 39. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Teacher Sample Responses
  40. 40. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Sample Teacher Profile #1 Teacher Experience NYC DOE teacher for 16 years teaching all subjects primarily at the 4th grade level in a General Education setting. Pre-Survey Results No prior familiarity with CT and moderate comfort with technology. No specific evidence of CT integrated instruction in classroom. This teacher has a strong belief in instructional technology and was recognized as a peer leader/professional development lead at their school for other school initiatives. Areas of Strength Strong belief in instructional technology. Prior experience sharing and leading learning for other colleagues. Prior experience integrating other school initiatives within curriculum for interdisciplinary learning. Areas of Growth Increasing confidence, comfort and familiarity with CT concepts.
  41. 41. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Sample Teacher Profile #1 Professional Learning Goal(s) 1. Enhance understanding of CT concepts through independent study and coaching sessions. 2. Explore instructional technology tools to identify best fit and build confidence/comfort with usage. 3. Identify curricular area for CT concept integration. Post Survey Results High confidence and usage of CT concepts in the classroom through unplugged and plugged activities. Moderate to advanced comfort with technology. Used existing skills as a peer leader to share tips regarding CT integration with other educators.
  42. 42. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Sample Teacher Profile #1 Plan Goals/ Notes This teacher’s learning plan focused on developing CT content knowledge to build their confidence in these concepts for future integration work. This approach is consistent across all our profiles but was especially important for this teacher as they felt some anxiety around trying something that felt brand new. After building content knowledge in CT through our initial sessions and selected resources for independent review, the teacher was able to build connections between the CT content and their classroom instruction. This led to coaching sessions centered on building student awareness of these concepts and providing them with opportunities to speak to their thinking/learning using CT. Once this took place, we were able to progress to specific planning to integrate CT within the classroom curriculum with a focus first on ELA. This brought in the use of new technology tools/platforms.
  43. 43. Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan
  44. 44. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Sample Teacher Profile #2 Teacher Experience NYC DOE teacher for 6 years teaching all subjects primarily at the 4th grade level in a General Education setting. Pre-Survey Results Prior familiarity with CT concepts and high level of comfort with technology. Demonstrated classroom activities that incorporated CT concepts in the classroom such as engaging in single use coding projects and computer science tasks. These activities were all separate tasks from the curricular work in their core subject areas. This teacher also reported low frequency of collaborative opportunities with their colleagues regarding CT and technology integration within the curriculum.
  45. 45. Process for Creating a Personalized Professional Learning Plan Sample Teacher Profile #2: Create the PPLP and first achievement goal for this teacher! Areas of Strength Identify 1-2 areas of strength Areas of Growth Identify 1-2 areas of growth Professional Learning Goal(s) Identify a first goal for this educator and some professional learning activities that this teacher needs. • What types of professional learning activities and support would this teacher need to achieve the goal? • What out of the classroom support/activities would you include? • What in the classroom support/activities would you include?
  46. 46. Access Jam Board to Share Your Thoughts https://qrco.de/DLAC20 22 You can choose to work with your table, with a partner or independently for this task.
  47. 47. Group discussion Let’s talk about your ideas for the personalized professional learning plan for Teacher Profile #2!
  48. 48. Key components of our professional learning model 1. Understanding individual teacher readiness through an assessment tool 2. Development of a personalized professional learning plan that aligns to the teachers’ readiness 3. 1:1/small group coaching and mentoring on tangible integration strategies 4. Focus on integration within core curriculum, not a separate activity 5. Professional online learning community for shared experiential learning 6. Build school capacity by seeding a schoolwide culture that aligns with school values About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  49. 49. Group discussion What makes an effective coaching session or engagement?
  50. 50. Effective coaching to build competency, confidence and comfort with new learning models Aside from having a clear vision and purpose behind each coaching session where the teacher has input into their own learning and growth, two factors contributed greatly to our program success: • Flexibility • Over the last two years especially, the day-to-day work at schools has changed drastically at various times. Ensuring that we can be flexible to meet teacher’s current realities and instructional priorities has been crucial. • Relationship Development • It is key to develop a relationship with each teacher as the coaching relationship is largely based on trust.
  51. 51. What’s next for us? ▪ Continued refinement of the model ▪ Evaluation of outcomes and impact ▪ Expansion to 20 schools in the 2022-23 school year ▪ Expansion beyond NYC ▪ Interest in adapting this model and our components to support teachers’ professional learning with other new learning approaches About the Project Tomorrow Professional Learning Project in New York City schools
  52. 52. About Project Tomorrow initiatives and research work To learn more about this project and/or to get a copy of today’s presentation sent directly to you, add your name and contact info to our print sign in sheets or on this online form.
  53. 53. Project Tomorrow reports, infographics, briefings and data insights for schools and districts www.tomorrow.org Additional resources ▪ Use Project Tomorrow research to inform your programs and initiatives – including local advocacy ▪ Share resources with your colleagues as a value-add and trusted source for information ▪ Encourage your school or district to use the Speak Up tools and be part of the larger Speak Up movement ▪ Engage with us to further explore how to build educator capacity for innovation ▪ Let us know if you are interested in replicating this work within your own school or district.
  54. 54. Let’s talk! What are your comments, ideas and questions? Building Teacher Competency, Confidence and Comfort for New Learning Models by Focusing on Teacher Readiness and Personalized Professional Learning
  55. 55. Thank you for joining us today! Julie A. Evans, Ed.D., CEO, Project Tomorrow @JulieEvans_PT jevans@tomorrow.org David Gomez, Instructional Coach, Project Tomorrow dgomez@tomorrow.org DLAC – February 8, 2022

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