Global privacy research

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Research undertaken by ComRes on behalf of Big Brother Watch into global attitudes towards privacy and Google.

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Global privacy research

  1. 1. International findingsBig Brother WatchOnline Privacy Survey
  2. 2. 1. Objectives and methodology2. Notes on public use of data3. Executive summary4. Findings in detail Online security concerns Big companies and consumer data Attitudes to regulatory action5. Summary of results6. Recommendations7. Results by gender and ageCONTENTSThis report is divided into the following key sections.234561116252729
  3. 3. o To understand public opinion regarding online privacy in nine countries globally.• Europe: UK, Germany, France, Spain.• Non-Europe: India, Japan, South Korea, Brazil, Australia.OBJECTIVESThis research is designed to understand views concerning online privacy globallyand attitudes to Google’s new privacy policy and the response of regulators310, 354interviews intotal(see below fordetail)Each countryweighted to benationallyrepresentativeof adults 18+Fieldwork:UK: 15th -17thFebruaryAll others: 13th– 19th MarchOnlinesurveyMETHODOLOGYUK* GER ESP FRA BRA IND JPN SKR AUSUnweightedsample2050 1050 1037 1050 1037 1022 1028 1036 1044* For analysis purposes UK data was weighted down so that each country contributed equallyto the global score achieved
  4. 4. NOTES ON PUBLIC USE OF DATAComRes’s research is conducted in accordance with the industry code ofconduct, and the company should be consulted before any data is released intothe public domain.4Guidelines for the public use of survey resultsComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules (www.britishpollingcouncil.org). This commitsus to the highest standards of transparency. The BPC’s rules state that all data and research findings made on the basisof surveys conducted by member organisations that enter the public domain must include reference to the following:• The company conducting the research (ComRes)• The client commissioning the survey• Dates of interviewing• Method of obtaining the interviews (e.g. in-person, post, telephone, internet)• The universe effectively represented (all adults, voters etc.)• The percentages upon which conclusions are based• Size of the sample and geographic coverage.Published references (such as a press release) should also show a web address where full data tables may be viewed,and they should also show the complete wording of questions upon which any data that has entered the public domain arebased.All press releases or other publications must be checked with ComRes before use. ComRes requires 48 hours tocheck a press release unless otherwise agreed.
  5. 5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYKEY TAKEAWAY: Globally consumers are concerned about their online privacyand think that national regulators should be doing more to enforce Google tocomply with existing privacy and data protection rules5Consumers areconcerned aboutonline privacy• A majority of consumers surveyed globally say that they are concerned about their privacy online.• Germany is the only country where a majority say they are unconcerned, perhaps due to relatively strict dataprotection laws already in place that protect personal data.Mixed views exist onbig companiescollecting personaldata• More consumers think that big companies gathering personal data harms consumers rather than enhancestheir online experience – though both views are well supported.• Consumers in South Korea, UK, Australia and France are the most critical of big companies gatheringpersonal data while consumers in Brazil, India and Spain are the most sympathetic to them doing so.Consumers say theEU was right toinvestigate Google’snew privacy policy• A clear majority of consumers, either in Europe or elsewhere in the world, think European regulators wereright to investigate Google’s new privacy policy.• Consumers in Japan and South Korea are less sure, although more say they were right than wrong. Amajority in Japan say they ‘don’t know’ if regulators were right to investigate.National regulatorsshould do more toprotect privacy• Globally, consumers think that national regulators should do more to force Google to comply with existingrules and regulations concerning data protection and privacy.• The exception is Japan, where consumers are most likely to say current action is ‘about right,’ perhaps areflection on recently introduced anti-piracy legislation in Japan which makes it one of the strictest regimes interms of online regulation in the world.
  6. 6. 6Online security concerns
  7. 7. Concern over personal privacy online (Global)Globally, more than three-quarters of consumers surveyed are concerned abouttheir privacy online71%3% 17% 41% 37%All respondentDont know Not at all concerned Not very concerned Fairly concerned Very concernedQ1: How concerned, if at all, are you about your privacy online?Base: All respondents (n=10354)78% concerned aboutpersonal privacy online20% not concerned aboutpersonal privacy onlineo More than three quarters (78%) globally say they are concerned about their privacy online.o Nearly two-fifths (37%) are very concerned about their privacy online.
  8. 8. Concern over personal privacy online (by market)A clear majority of consumers in all countries surveyed are concerned about theirprivacy online (with the exception of Germany)8Q1: How concerned, if at all, are you about your privacy online?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050; Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concernedUK GER ESP FRAConcerned* 68% 42% 90% 72%Not concerned 29% 56% 10% 26%Don’t know 3% 1% 0% 2%BRAConcerned 90%Not concerned 10%Don’t know 0%INDConcerned 94%Not concerned 5%Don’t know 1%JPN SKRConcerned 84% 81%Not concerned 14% 18%Don’t know 2% 1%AUSConcerned 85%Not concerned 14%Don’t know 0%o Consumers in India followed by Brazil and Spain are the most likely to say they are concerned about their privacy online.o In Germany views on online privacy are fairly polarised with over half (56%) not concerned and 42% concerned.
  9. 9. Concern over personal privacy online (Europe)In Europe, Spanish consumers are most concerned about their privacy online;German consumers are least concerned93%1%2%4%7%10%25%50%9%16%46%34%42%36%22%8%48%35%UKGermanySpainFranceDont know Not at all concerned Not very concerned Fairly concerned Very concernedo Germany has relatively strict data protection laws restricting the use of personal information* which perhaps explains whythe majority (56%) appear not concerned about their privacy online. However, it is worthwhile to note that a substantial.minority (42%) is still fairly or very concerned about their privacy online.Q1: How concerned, if at all, are you about your privacy online?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050)*Background on German privacy laws and Facebook http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14859813http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/04/facebook-germany-data-protection?INTCMP=SRCH**Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned29% 68%56% 42%10% 90%26% 72%Notconcerned**Concerned
  10. 10. Concern over personal privacy online (non Europe)Across the other countries surveyed, consumers in India and Brazil are mostlikely to say they are very concerned about their privacy online101%2%1%2%1%1%1%2%13%4%13%18%7%43%21%62%57%28%42%73%22%24%62%AustraliaIndiaJapanSouth KoreaBrazilDont know Not at all concerned Not very concerned Fairly concerned Very concernedQ1: How concerned, if at all, are you about your privacy online?Base: All respondents (Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned14% 85%5% 94%14% 84%18% 81%10% 90%o A vast majority of consumers in all non-European countries included in the study are concerned about their privacy online.Notconcerned*Concerned
  11. 11. 11Big companies andconsumer data
  12. 12. Views on personal data collected by big companies (Global)Two-fifths of consumers surveyed globally think big companies are causing harmby gathering large amounts of personal data for internal use1241%29%19%11%Consumers are being harmedby big companies gatheringlarge amounts of theirpersonal data for internal useConsumer experiences arebeing enhanced by bigcompanies gathering largeamounts of their personaldata for internal useNeither Dont knowQ2: Which one of the following statements comes closest to your view?Base: All respondents (n=10354)o Two-fifths (41%) of consumers surveyed globally say that consumers are being harmed by big companies gathering largeamounts of personal data for internal use.o However, there is some sympathy for big companies gathering data:• One in three (30%) think consumer experiences are being enhanced,• One in five (19%) think consumers are neither being harmed nor having experiences enhanced,• One in ten (11%) say they don’t know.
  13. 13. Views on personal data collected by big companies (by market)Views on the collection of personal data by big companies vary by country withconsumers often being divided within countries too13Q2: Which one of the following statements comes closest to your view?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050; Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)Gathering of personal data… UK GER ESP FRAHarms consumers 46% 39% 38% 44%Enhances consumer experiences 18% 22% 47% 35%Neither 21% 30% 9% 11%Don’t know 16% 9% 6% 9%Gathering of personal data… BRAHarms consumers 32%Enhances consumer experiences 51%Neither 9%Don’t know 7%Gathering of personal data… INDHarms consumers 32%Enhances consumer experiences 48%Neither 12%Don’t know 8%Gathering of personal data… JPN SKRHarms consumers 21% 78%Enhances consumer experiences 11% 8%Neither 51% 5%Don’t know 17% 9%Gathering of personal data… AUSHarms consumers 40%Enhances consumer experiences 25%Neither 18%Don’t know 17%o Consumers in South Korea are the most critical of big companies collecting large amounts of personal data. Consumers in theUK, Australia, Germany and France are more likely to say it harms consumers than enhances their experience.o Those in Brazil, India and Spain are more likely to say that personal data collected is being used to improve experiences.o Consumers in Japan are most likely to say that gathering personal data neither harms nor enhances consumer experiences.
  14. 14. Views on personal data collected by big companies (Europe)1446%18% 21%16%39%22%30%9%38%47%9% 6%44%35%11% 9%Consumers are being harmedby big companies gatheringlarge amounts of theirpersonal data for internal useConsumer experiences arebeing enhanced by bigcompanies gathering largeamounts of their personaldata for internal useNeither Dont knowUK Germany Spain FranceQ2: Which one of the following statements comes closest to your view?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050)In Europe, views concerning the collection of personal data by big companies forinternal use vary by marketo In Europe, consumers in the UK, Germany and France are more likely to think that big companies gathering personal dataharms consumers.• In Germany, 3 in 10 are neutral on the subject, probably reflecting comparatively less concern about online privacy overall.o in Spain, consumers are more likely to think that gathering personal data for internal use enhances consumers experiences.
  15. 15. Views on personal data collected by big companies (non Europe)1540%25%18% 17%32%48%12% 8%21%11%51%17%78%8% 5% 9%32%51%9% 7%Consumers are being harmedby big companies gatheringlarge amounts of theirpersonal data for internal useConsumer experiences arebeing enhanced by bigcompanies gathering largeamounts of their personaldata for internal useNeither Dont knowAustralia India Japan South Korea Brazilo Consumers in South Korea are the most critical of big companies gathering personal data. This is not surprising given that thecountry has a history of large scale compromising of personal data through hacking of social networking and government sites.*o In contrast, there are relatively more consumers in India and Brazil that think personal data being collected by big companies ismore likely to enhance consumer experiences.o Consumers in Japan are most likely to think that the gathering of data by big companies neither harms consumers norenhances their online experience.Q2: Which one of the following statements comes closest to your view?Base: All respondents (Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)* Example from 2011 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14323787Across other countries surveyed, views on whether companies gathering largeamount of personal data harms or benefits consumers are fairly diverse
  16. 16. 16Attitudes to regulatoryaction
  17. 17. Attitudes to EU regulatory action (Global)Globally, a clear majority of consumers believe European regulators were right toinvestigate Google’s new privacy policy1766%13%21%Right Wrong Dont knowOne year ago, Google announced it was introducing a new privacy policy which it said streamlined existingpolicies whilst enabling it to provide better consumer experiences across its products. However, data protectionauthorities (non Europe countries only: in Europe) were concerned and investigated, reporting on 16th October2012, that the “investigation confirmed our concerns about the combination of data across services. The newPrivacy Policy allows Google to combine almost any data from any services for any purposes.”Q3: Generally speaking, do you think privacy and data protection regulators (non Europe countries only: inEurope) were right or wrong to investigate Google’s privacy policy and how it allows the company to collect andcombine data on consumers?Base: All respondents (n=10354)o Two out of three consumers (66%) surveyed believe that regulators in Europe were right to investigate Google’s newprivacy policy with only a little over 1 in 10 (13%) thinking this was the wrong thing to do.o One in five (21%) of those surveyed say they don’t know whether regulators were right to take action.
  18. 18. Attitudes to EU regulatory action (by market)In all markets surveyed, consumers were more likely to say that Europeanregulators were right rather than wrong to investigate Google’s new privacy policy18* Please see the introduction to the question on slide 17Q3: Generally speaking, do you think privacy and data protection regulators (non Europe countries only: in Europe)were right or wrong to investigate Google’s privacy policy and how it allows the company to collect and combine dataon consumers?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050; Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)UK GER ESP FRARight 71% 69% 78% 76%Wrong 11% 14% 12% 12%Don’t know 18% 16% 10% 12%BRARight 80%Wrong 8%Don’t know 11%INDRight 73%Wrong 10%Don’t know 17%JPN SKRRight 29% 48%Wrong 17% 23%Don’t know 54% 29%AUSRight 74%Wrong 9%Don’t know 17%o Consumers in Japan and South Korea are less likely to agree to agree European regulators were right than consumers in othermarkets, although more agree than disagree. A sizeable proportion of consumers in Japan and South Korea say that they don’tknow.
  19. 19. Attitudes to EU regulatory action (Europe)A clear majority of consumers in Europe say that regulators were right toinvestigate Google’s new privacy policy1971%11%18%69%14% 16%78%12% 10%76%12% 12%Right Wrong Dont knowUK Germany Spain France* Please see the introduction to the question on slide 17Q3: Generally speaking, do you think privacy and data protection regulators were right or wrong to investigateGoogle’s privacy policy and how it allows the company to collect and combine data on consumers?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050)o In European markets, at least seven in ten say regulators were right to investigate Google’s privacy policy and how it allowsthe company to collect and combine data on consumers.
  20. 20. In other countries surveyed, there is a clear divide between Asian and non Asianmarkets – though more think action was right rather than wrong in all markets2074%9%17%73%10%17%29%17%54%48%23%29%80%8% 11%Right Wrong Dont knowAustralia India Japan South Korea Brazilo Consumers in Australia, India and Brazil are supportive of action taken by European data regulators to investigate Google.o Views in Japan and South Korea are more mixed. Although more agree than disagree that European regulators were rightto investigate Google, a high proportion of consumers say they don’t know whether actions were right or wrong than inother markets.Attitudes to EU regulatory action (non Europe)* Please see the introduction to the question on slide 17Q3: Generally speaking, do you think privacy and data protection regulators in Europe were right or wrong toinvestigate Google’s privacy policy and how it allows the company to collect and combine data on consumers?Base: All respondents (Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)
  21. 21. Is current regulation sufficient? (global)Globally, consumers think that regulators should do more to force Google tocomply with existing regulations on privacy and the protection of personal data21Q4: Europe: And do you think that national regulators should be doing more or less to force Google to complywith existing European Directives on privacy and protection of personal data?Non Europe: And do you think that national regulators in general should be doing more or less to force Google tocomply with existing rules and regulations on privacy and protection of personal data?Base: All respondents (n=10354)65%18%5%11%Should be doing moreCurrent action is about rightShould be doing less Dont knowo Two out of three (65%) of consumers surveyed believe that national regulators should do more to force Google to complywith existing regulations concerning online privacy and the protection of personal data.o Around one in five (18%) think the current level of action is about right.o One in ten (11%) say they don’t know suggesting more education is required on what action is being taken and how thisbenefits consumers.
  22. 22. Is current regulation sufficient? (by market)In all countries surveyed (apart from Japan) consumers believe that nationalregulators should do more to force Google to comply with existing regulations22Q4: Europe: And do you think that national regulators should be doing more or less to force Google to comply withexisting European Directives on privacy and protection of personal data?Non Europe: And do you think that national regulators in general should be doing more or less to force Google tocomply with existing rules and regulations on privacy and protection of personal data?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050; Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)UK GER ESP FRAMore 66% 73% 80% 70%Current action is about right 14% 18% 12% 16%Less 4% 2% 3% 6%Don’t know 16% 6% 5% 8%BRAMore 80%Current action is about right 13%Less 3%Don’t know 5%INDMore 60%Current action is about right 19%Less 13%Don’t know 8%JPN SKRMore 31% 59%Current action is about right 36% 19%Less 6% 11%Don’t know 27% 12%AUSMore 69%Current action is about right 17%Less 3%Don’t know 11%o In Japan, views are fairly evenly split between ‘more regulation’ (31%), ‘current action is about right’ (36%) and ‘don’t know’(27%).
  23. 23. Is current regulation sufficient? (Europe)2366%14%4%16%73%18%2% 6%80%12%3% 5%70%16%6% 8%More Current action is about right Less Don’t knowUK Germany Spain FranceQ4: And do you think that national regulators should be doing more or less to force Google to comply withexisting European Directives on privacy and protection of personal data?Base: All respondents (UK 2050; Ger 1050; Esp 1037; Fra 1050)In all European markets, consumers say national regulators should do more toforce Google to comply with EU directives concerning data protection and privacyo At least two-thirds in all European markets surveyed say that national regulators should be doing more to force Google tocomply with existing European Directives on privacy and the protection of personal data.
  24. 24. Consumers in non European markets, aside from Japan, agree that nationalregulators should be doing more to force Google to comply with existing rulesconcerning data protection and privacy online2469%17%3%11%60%19%13%8%31%36%6%27%59%19%11% 12%80%13%3% 5%More Current action is about right Less Don’t knowAustralia India Japan South Korea Brazilo In all non European markets apart from Japan, consumers think national regulators should be doing more to force Googleto comply with current regulations concerning online privacy and data protection.o The relatively high score for ‘current action is about right’ (36%) in Japan is probably a reflection on the recently introducedanti-piracy legislation which makes Japan one of the most stringent anti-file sharing regimes in the world.*Is current regulation sufficient? (non Europe)Q4: And do you think that national regulators in general should be doing more or less to force Google to complywith existing rules and regulations on privacy and protection of personal data?Base: All respondents (Bra 1037; Ind 1022; Jpn 1028; SKr 1036; Aus 1044)* Background on file-sharing legislation in Japan: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19767970;http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-10/02/japan-strict-copyright-law
  25. 25. 25Summary of results
  26. 26. Summary of resultsSummary of results26UK GER ESP FRA AUS IND JPN SKR BRAConcern overprivacy onlineConcernedNot (very)concernedVeryconcernedConcernedVeryconcernedVeryconcernedVeryconcernedVeryconcernedVeryconcernedGathering ofpersonal databy bigcompaniesHarmful HarmfulEnhancesconsumerexperienceHarmful HarmfulEnhancesconsumerexperienceNeitherVeryharmfulEnhancesconsumerexperienceEU right toinvestigateGoogleRight Right Right Right Right Right Don’t knowMostlyrightRightNationalregulatorsshould do moreor lessMore More More More More MoreCurrentaction isabout rightMore More
  27. 27. 27Recommendations
  28. 28. Key findings and recommendationsKEY TAKEAWAY: Big Brother Watch has a role to play in educating the publicglobally on the issues and in acting as an advocate for their concerns. Anycommunications activity undertaken should reflect market nuance28Recommendations:• More work could be done globally toestablish what the key concerns are ineach market to better informcommunications activity.• Big Brother Watch has a role to play ineducating consumers as to what themain threats to their security online areand what consumers can do to protectthemselves against them.• More work could be done in Germanyto educate the public about the threatsthat exist as concern is currentlyweaker in this market than in others.Recommendations:• More work could be done to establishwhat the public knows about how bigcompanies collect and use their dataand to educate them on this if theydon’t know.• Big Brother Watch has a role to playhighlighting public concern in this areato regulators and policy makersnationally.• Messaging on this subject should betailored to each country to account formarket nuance as opinions by marketdiffer on this subject.Finding: Majority of consumers globallythink regulators in Europe were right toinvestigate Googles new privacy policyand most think more should be done toforce Google to meets existingregulations.Recommendations:• Big Brother Watch should highlight thepublic appetite for more action toregulators and policy makers.• Criticism from Google on regulatoryaction can be refuted by the fact thepublic regulators were right toinvestigate their new privacy policy.•Specific work should be done in Asia toremind consumers of the actionsregulators can take and why this isbeneficial to them.Finding: A majority of consumersglobally are concerned about theirprivacy online.Finding: More consumers globallybelieve that big companies gatheringpersonal data is harmful to consumersrather than enhancing their onlineexperience. However, opinions aredivided, particularly in Asia.
  29. 29. 29Results by gender and age
  30. 30. Summary of results by gender and age30Base: UK (All 2050; Men 966, Women 1084; 18-24 184, 25-34 319, 35-44 388, 45-54 367, 55-64 327, 65+ 465)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concernedConcern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 68 63 73 59 68 71 66 67 73Not concerned 29 34 24 34 27 26 31 30 27Don’t know 3 3 3 7 4 2 3 3 0Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 46 48 44 43 43 45 45 45 52Enhances consumer experiences 18 20 16 24 24 22 16 12 11Neither 21 22 20 12 16 20 23 28 24Don’t know 16 11 20 21 17 14 16 15 14Right 71 72 69 65 61 66 72 79 79Wrong 11 11 10 10 16 14 9 9 7Don’t know 18 17 20 25 24 20 19 12 14More 66 68 65 51 57 64 72 75 74Current action is about right 14 15 14 14 16 15 13 14 15Less 4 5 3 8 8 6 1 1 1Don’t know 16 13 19 28 20 15 15 11 11Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)
  31. 31. 31Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 42 43 42 55 49 39 48 43 33Not concerned 56 55 57 44 51 59 52 55 65Don’t know 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 2Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 39 44 35 48 35 39 46 35 37Enhances consumer experiences 22 22 21 25 28 20 19 23 20Neither 30 28 33 21 32 31 27 31 34Don’t know 9 7 11 6 5 10 8 11 9Right 69 75 63 72 69 67 69 69 70Wrong 14 12 17 16 21 11 17 9 14Don’t know 16 13 20 12 11 22 14 22 15More 73 75 71 75 75 65 76 74 76Current action is about right 18 18 19 14 19 22 16 18 17Less 2 3 2 5 3 4 2 0 1Don’t know 6 4 8 6 3 8 6 8 6Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Summary of results by gender and ageBase: Germany (All 1050; Men 537, Women 513; 18-24 110, 25-34 161, 35-44 224, 45-54 199, 55-64 156, 65+ 200)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  32. 32. 32Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 90 90 91 93 87 93 90 93 88Not concerned 10 10 9 6 13 7 10 7 12Don’t know 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 38 40 35 39 40 35 36 40 38Enhances consumer experiences 47 48 47 51 47 52 44 43 47Neither 9 7 11 5 9 8 12 12 8Don’t know 6 5 7 6 4 5 8 5 7Right 78 77 79 84 75 82 78 78 74Wrong 12 13 11 11 14 11 9 10 14Don’t know 10 9 11 5 10 7 13 12 12More 80 78 82 72 82 83 80 87 76Current action is about right 12 15 10 20 10 10 13 5 17Less 3 4 1 4 4 3 0 1 2Don’t know 5 3 6 5 4 4 6 7 4Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Summary of results by gender and ageBase: Spain (All 1037; Men 540, Women 497; 18-24 110, 25-34 233, 35-44 217, 45-54 175, 55-64 157, 65+ 145)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  33. 33. 33Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 72 73 71 82 81 74 71 65 63Not concerned 26 27 26 16 18 24 26 33 36Don’t know 2 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 1Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 44 49 40 53 48 41 41 44 43Enhances consumer experiences 35 35 35 30 32 37 39 33 38Neither 11 9 13 8 10 12 12 13 11Don’t know 9 7 12 9 10 11 8 10 8Right 76 79 73 84 75 72 75 77 75Wrong 12 11 13 6 13 14 11 12 12Don’t know 12 10 15 9 12 14 13 11 13More 70 71 68 68 72 65 66 74 73Current action is about right 16 16 17 17 16 20 17 12 16Less 6 6 5 5 4 7 6 7 4Don’t know 8 7 10 10 8 9 11 7 6Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Summary of results by gender and ageBase: France (All 1050; Men 503, Women 547; 18-24 124, 25-34 186, 35-44 200, 45-54 194, 55-64 167, 65+ 179)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  34. 34. Summary of results by gender and age34Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 85 84 86 78 82 86 85 90 90Not concerned 14 15 14 21 17 13 15 10 10Don’t know 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 40 43 37 37 33 43 39 38 49Enhances consumer experiences 25 29 22 31 32 24 28 23 14Neither 18 16 19 16 18 18 14 20 19Don’t know 17 12 23 15 17 15 19 19 18Right 74 75 74 71 67 75 69 78 84Wrong 9 11 7 9 8 9 14 8 5Don’t know 17 15 20 20 25 16 17 14 10More 69 70 67 56 61 70 74 70 80Current action is about right 17 18 16 23 20 15 14 17 14Less 3 4 2 7 7 5 1 0 0Don’t know 11 8 14 14 12 10 11 13 6Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Base: Australia (All 1044; Men 499, Women 545; 18-24 139, 25-34 184, 35-44 191, 45-54 181, 55-64 160, 65+ 189)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  35. 35. Summary of results by gender and age35Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 94 93 96 94 94 94 94 97 93Not concerned 5 6 3 4 4 5 5 3 7Don’t know 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 0Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 32 31 33 29 35 29 37 34 31Enhances consumer experiences 48 52 44 51 51 51 41 42 42Neither 12 10 14 12 9 12 13 10 22Don’t know 8 6 9 8 5 8 9 13 5Right 73 77 67 73 77 72 71 65 70Wrong 10 8 13 15 11 9 10 7 5Don’t know 17 14 20 13 12 19 19 28 25More 60 62 57 54 66 58 62 60 59Current action is about right 19 19 20 22 15 17 18 20 31Less 13 13 12 16 13 16 9 7 3Don’t know 8 7 10 8 6 9 11 12 8Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Base: India (All 1022; Men 568, Women 454; 18-24 294, 25-34 275, 35-44 198, 45-54 134, 55-64 80, 65+ 41)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  36. 36. Summary of results by gender and age36Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 90 88 92 88 91 93 91 88 86Not concerned 10 12 7 11 9 7 9 11 14Don’t know 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 32 32 32 27 31 34 33 35 44Enhances consumer experiences 51 53 49 54 57 51 47 53 29Neither 9 8 10 14 7 5 12 7 12Don’t know 7 6 9 6 5 10 8 5 14Right 80 81 80 78 82 82 84 77 77Wrong 8 10 6 9 8 7 7 9 11Don’t know 11 9 14 12 10 11 9 14 12More 80 81 79 74 80 84 81 89 74Current action is about right 13 11 14 18 12 11 13 5 12Less 3 4 2 4 1 2 3 2 8Don’t know 5 3 6 4 7 3 3 3 7Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Base: Brazil (All 1037; Men 524, Women 513; 18-24 273, 25-34 259, 35-44 215, 45-54 141, 55-64 117, 65+ 32)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  37. 37. Summary of results by gender and age37Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 84 83 85 86 81 80 82 86 86Not concerned 14 16 12 12 17 17 15 13 12Don’t know 2 1 3 1 2 3 3 0 2Gathering of personal data…Harms consumers 21 23 19 28 22 27 19 17 17Enhances consumer experiences 11 12 10 13 12 9 11 10 12Neither 51 52 50 46 49 55 50 54 51Don’t know 17 13 21 14 18 9 20 19 21Right 29 33 24 28 34 32 26 28 26Wrong 17 20 15 23 17 16 21 15 16Don’t know 54 47 60 49 49 53 53 58 57More 31 35 27 28 31 33 38 28 30Current action is about right 36 36 37 45 34 41 27 35 37Less 6 7 4 4 9 2 7 6 6Don’t know 27 21 32 24 26 24 28 30 27Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Base: Japan (All 1028; Men 538, Women 490; 18-24 87, 25-34 157, 35-44 185, 45-54 157, 55-64 235, 65+ 207)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  38. 38. Summary of results by gender and age38Concern overpersonal privacyonlineTOTAL Men Women 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Concerned* 81 78 84 84 83 84 80 81 73Not concerned 18 22 14 16 17 15 19 19 24Don’t know 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 3Gathering or personal data…Harms consumers 78 80 76 70 81 84 79 79 73Enhances consumer experiences 8 8 8 8 6 8 9 8 8Neither 5 6 5 8 2 4 4 5 9Don’t know 9 6 12 15 11 4 8 8 10Right 48 54 42 40 50 50 47 47 54Wrong 23 23 23 23 19 23 21 28 28Don’t know 29 23 35 37 31 27 32 25 18More 59 62 55 44 62 63 64 66 51Current action is about right 19 18 20 26 14 17 15 17 25Less 11 12 10 13 9 9 8 10 17Don’t know 12 8 16 17 15 11 13 6 6Views on personaldata collected by bigcompaniesEuropean regulatorsright or wrong toinvestigate Google’sprivacy policy?Should nationalregulators (in general)do more or less toforce Google tocomply?Gender (%) Age (%)(%)Base: South Korea (All 1036; Men 561, Women 475; 18-24 155, 25-34 195, 35-44 213, 45-54 225, 55-64 189, 65+ 59)*Concerned = very/fairly concerned, Not concerned = not at all/not very concerned
  39. 39. For more information please contact:39Keiran PedleyResearch Team Manager - Political & MediaComResKeiran.Pedley@comres.co.uk020 7871 8664

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