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A Summer with Herons<br />Sapsucker Woods, Ithaca, New York, 2009<br />
In 2009, Cornell Lab visitors were treated to the sight of a Great Blue Heron pair raising a family. By May 4, a stick nes...
The stick nest was quiet for about a month while adults incubated. On June 11, we got our first glimpse of a fuzzy chick h...
By June 16 we could see two chicks. There were more to come!<br />
Even with chicks in the nest, the adults continued adding sticks...<br />
…sometimes passing them from one to another.<br />
With mouths to feed, the adults began fishing. People could see them through the window at the visitor’s center, and along...
June 17: Three chicks now visible in the nest.<br />
One adult takes a delicate hold of someone’s dinner.<br />
Count beaks – four nestlings! This is the full family of six.<br />
After feeding the young and preening, the adults would fly off for more fishing.<br />
By June 29 the young were getting quite tall.<br />
Now after feeding they spent time stretching, playing with sticks, and touching one another, sometimes tugging on feathers...
Though this one has spread its wings, it’ll still be a while before it actually leaves the nest.<br />
The oldest of these nestlings might leave the nest as early as July 24 – or could stick around till late August. We’ll be ...
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Great Blue Herons at Sapsucker Woods

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Photographic highlights of the first known Great Blue Heron nest at Sapsucker Woods, Ithaca, New York. Photographs by Laura Erickson and Charles Eldermire (first photo), Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Great Blue Herons at Sapsucker Woods

  1. A Summer with Herons<br />Sapsucker Woods, Ithaca, New York, 2009<br />
  2. In 2009, Cornell Lab visitors were treated to the sight of a Great Blue Heron pair raising a family. By May 4, a stick nest was well under way.<br />
  3. The stick nest was quiet for about a month while adults incubated. On June 11, we got our first glimpse of a fuzzy chick head, just visible here.<br />
  4. By June 16 we could see two chicks. There were more to come!<br />
  5. Even with chicks in the nest, the adults continued adding sticks...<br />
  6. …sometimes passing them from one to another.<br />
  7. With mouths to feed, the adults began fishing. People could see them through the window at the visitor’s center, and along the pond’s banks.<br />
  8. June 17: Three chicks now visible in the nest.<br />
  9. One adult takes a delicate hold of someone’s dinner.<br />
  10. Count beaks – four nestlings! This is the full family of six.<br />
  11. After feeding the young and preening, the adults would fly off for more fishing.<br />
  12. By June 29 the young were getting quite tall.<br />
  13. Now after feeding they spent time stretching, playing with sticks, and touching one another, sometimes tugging on feathers or beaks.<br />
  14. Though this one has spread its wings, it’ll still be a while before it actually leaves the nest.<br />
  15. The oldest of these nestlings might leave the nest as early as July 24 – or could stick around till late August. We’ll be keeping watch on them!<br />

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