How To Start the Agile
Conversation At Your
Organization
Tim Wise
Enterprise Agile Coach
tim@leadingagile.com
twitter.com/timswise
linkedin.com/in/timwise
www.leadingagile.com
fac...
How many are using any form of
agile?
Exercise
What are the reasons that agile fails?
Breaking Down the Agile Misconception
What we say: “We want to do agile”
What they really hear:
• “We want to do our own t...
Breaking Down the Agile Misconception
A wise, retired CIO once told me. “Don’t sell me your
solution, solve my problem.”
Breaking Down the Agile Misconception
Problem: Agile as a term has fundamentally
changed in the minds of our customers
Sol...
BEGINNING A DISCUSSION OF
AGILE TRANSFORMATION
Problem: We are selling the solution not fixing the
problem.
Solution:
List...
Thinking
Seeing
Gain
Hearing
Feeling
Pain
Being John Malkovich… The CFO
Their Problems
• Predictability
• Time to ROI
• Quality
• Economics
• Adaptability
• Risk Reduction
Gaining Permission To Coach
The Problem: They aren't listening... Yet
The Solution: Discovering the desired outcomes
toget...
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Management System
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Solution
Irrational
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Management Systems
Irrational
Become
Predictable
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Management Systems
Irrational
Become
Predictable
Reduce
Time to ROI
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Management Systems
Irrational
Become
Predictable
Reduce
Time to ROI
Maximize
Economic Return
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Manageme...
Getting to The Trusted Discussion
Problem: That’s great, but we have no idea how to get
there
Solution:
Drive toward the B...
How does Agile Work?
Small Teams deliver increments of value
Backlog prioritized by value
At scale, the backlog need to be...
Lot’s of Teams
Scrum of…
Scrum of…
Scrum Masters?
Scrum of…
Product Owners?
Scrum of…
Anyone or None?
We need a Value Structure And
Guidance
Done
Develop
and Test
Ready To
Build
Detailed
Planning
Release
Targeting
Feasibility
Study
Market
Research
New
Concept
Fea...
Remember
• Fixed teams
• Reduce batch size
What Is Needed To Move?
Irrational
Become
Predictable
Predictive Adaptive
Emergent
Convergent
Management Systems
Steps to Start the Agile
Conversation
• Break down the agile misconceptions
• Sell the problem
• Listen to customer needs
...
Tim Wise
Enterprise Agile Coach
tim@leadingagile.com
twitter.com/timswise
linkedin.com/in/timwise
www.leadingagile.com
fac...
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How to start the agile conversation in your organization

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This presentation targets starting conversations with executives about agile without saying a whole lot about agile. Buzzwords just won't cut it anymore and we need a clear way to discuss business strategy and common problems with executives. This is a presentation about having that discussion.

Check out http://www.leadingagile.com/2014/02/dont-sell-agile-solve-my-problem/ for more information.

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  • Getting your foot in the door to even discuss agility can be impossible. This talk will cover how to make the impossible possible through a concrete set of steps that enable an internal or external consultant to begin the discussion of Enterprise Agility. This topic is near to my heart. I have seen myself and others struggle to get agile into organizations but I have never seen a talk on it explicitly. This is that talk.
  • - ? Perhaps understanding your audience
  • Agile and scrum in particular, has a bad rap. It has failed for many. Maybe a fairer statement would be that many have failed it.However, that is not the issue…Intent – point out that agile doesn’t mean… scrum or TDDAgile -
  • We have been selling a solution, but we haven’t listened to the problem.
  • Agile and scrum in particular, has a bad rap. It has failed for many. Maybe a fairer statement would be that many have failed it.However, that is not the issue…Intent – point out that agile doesn’t mean… scrum or TDDAgile -
  • Adapted from Xplane.comThinking – What is important to the customer and why? Worries, fears? AspirationsHearing - What boss, friends and influencers say?Seeing – Environment, friends, market offerings?Saying – What is the customer saying to others around them? In publicDo - What is the customer doing? Appearance/behaviorPain – What obstacles or challenges does the customer have? Fears frustrations/obstaclesGain – What does the customer hope to achieve. How might they measure success? Wants needs measures of successOld movie, Being John Malcovich.GOAL: The goal of the game is to gain a deeper level of understanding of a stakeholder in your business ecosystem, which may be a client, prospect, partner, etc., within a given context, such as a buying decision or an experience using a product or service. The exercise can be as simple or complex as you want to make it. You should be able to make a rough empathy map in about 20 minutes, provided you have a decent understanding of the person and context you want to map. Even if you don’t understand the stakeholder very well, the empathy-mapping exercise can help you identify gaps in your understanding and help you gain a deeper understanding of the things you don’t yet know.1. Start by drawing a circle to represent the person and give the circle a name and some identifying information such as a job title. It helps if you can think of a real person who roughly fits the profile, so you can keep them in mind as you proceed. In keeping with the idea of a “profile” think of the circle as the profile of a person’s head and fill in some details. You might want to add eyes, mouth, nose, ears, and maybe glasses if appropriate or a hairstyle to differentiate the person from other profiles you might want to create. These simple details are not a frivolous addition — they will help you project yourself into the experience of that person, which is the point of the exercise.2. Determine a question you have for that stakeholder. If you had a question you would want to ask them, or a situation in their life you want to understand, what would that be? You might want to understand a certain kind of buying decision, for example, in which case your question might be “Why should I buy X?”3. Divide the circle into sections that represent aspects of that person’s sensory experience. What are they thinking, feeling, saying, doing, hearing? Label the appropriate sections on the image.4. Now it’s time for you to practice the “empathy” portion of the exercise. As best you can, try to project yourself into that person’s experience and understand the context you want to explore. Then start to fill in the diagram with real, tangible, sensory experiences. If you are filling in the “hearing” section, for example, try to think of what the person might hear, and how they would hear it. In the “saying” section, try to write their thoughts as they would express them. Don’t put your words into their mouth — the point is to truly understand and empathize with their situation so you can design a better product, service or whatever.5. Check yourself: Ask others to review your map, make suggestions, and add details or context. The more the person can identify with the actual stakeholder the better. Over time you will hone your ability to understand and empathize with others in your business ecosystem, which will help you improve your relationships and your results.
  • PredictabilityTime to ROIQuality – How satisfied are their customers and how much are they paying on the backend of delivering solutionsEconomics – Market pressures are calling for them to do more with lessAdaptability –The need to adapt and run experiments with the market quicklyRisk Reduction – Early and Often
  • Agile and scrum in particular, has a bad rap. It has failed for many. Maybe a fairer statement would be that many have failed it.However, that is not the issue…Intent – point out that agile doesn’t mean… scrum or TDDAgile -
  • A funny thing happens when you drive toward business goals. Ideas and buy-in become sticky. Everyone can agree or agree on why we are doing something different.It’s important to be consistent on your message. Don’t sell them a business improvement and implement agile. Sell them a business improvement and fix the business.Predictability: Stable teams.Time to market: Reduction of batch sizeThe solutions will flow with a purpose.
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • PMI Founded in 1969
  • It turns out we need structure and guidance. Guidance not from managers, but from a mapping of how we produce value in the system. This enables analysis of the system. So guidance is really, governance.
  • To focus on batch size and reduction of cycle time
  • Adapted from Xplane.comThinking – What is important to the customer and why? Worries, fears? AspirationsHearing - What boss, friends and influencers say?Seeing – Environment, friends, market offerings?Saying – What is the customer saying to others around them? In publicDo - What is the customer doing? Appearance/behaviorPain – What obstacles or challenges does the customer have? Fears frustrations/obstaclesGain – What does the customer hope to achieve. How might they measure success? Wants needs measures of successOld movie, Being John Malcovich.GOAL: The goal of the game is to gain a deeper level of understanding of a stakeholder in your business ecosystem, which may be a client, prospect, partner, etc., within a given context, such as a buying decision or an experience using a product or service. The exercise can be as simple or complex as you want to make it. You should be able to make a rough empathy map in about 20 minutes, provided you have a decent understanding of the person and context you want to map. Even if you don’t understand the stakeholder very well, the empathy-mapping exercise can help you identify gaps in your understanding and help you gain a deeper understanding of the things you don’t yet know.1. Start by drawing a circle to represent the person and give the circle a name and some identifying information such as a job title. It helps if you can think of a real person who roughly fits the profile, so you can keep them in mind as you proceed. In keeping with the idea of a “profile” think of the circle as the profile of a person’s head and fill in some details. You might want to add eyes, mouth, nose, ears, and maybe glasses if appropriate or a hairstyle to differentiate the person from other profiles you might want to create. These simple details are not a frivolous addition — they will help you project yourself into the experience of that person, which is the point of the exercise.2. Determine a question you have for that stakeholder. If you had a question you would want to ask them, or a situation in their life you want to understand, what would that be? You might want to understand a certain kind of buying decision, for example, in which case your question might be “Why should I buy X?”3. Divide the circle into sections that represent aspects of that person’s sensory experience. What are they thinking, feeling, saying, doing, hearing? Label the appropriate sections on the image.4. Now it’s time for you to practice the “empathy” portion of the exercise. As best you can, try to project yourself into that person’s experience and understand the context you want to explore. Then start to fill in the diagram with real, tangible, sensory experiences. If you are filling in the “hearing” section, for example, try to think of what the person might hear, and how they would hear it. In the “saying” section, try to write their thoughts as they would express them. Don’t put your words into their mouth — the point is to truly understand and empathize with their situation so you can design a better product, service or whatever.5. Check yourself: Ask others to review your map, make suggestions, and add details or context. The more the person can identify with the actual stakeholder the better. Over time you will hone your ability to understand and empathize with others in your business ecosystem, which will help you improve your relationships and your results.
  • How to start the agile conversation in your organization

    1. 1. How To Start the Agile Conversation At Your Organization
    2. 2. Tim Wise Enterprise Agile Coach tim@leadingagile.com twitter.com/timswise linkedin.com/in/timwise www.leadingagile.com facebook.com/leadingagile
    3. 3. How many are using any form of agile?
    4. 4. Exercise What are the reasons that agile fails?
    5. 5. Breaking Down the Agile Misconception What we say: “We want to do agile” What they really hear: • “We want to do our own thing” or • “We want to do something that has made you look bad before” or • “We don’t want to use hours for estimation, we are a bunch of hippies and we estimate in rainbows.”
    6. 6. Breaking Down the Agile Misconception A wise, retired CIO once told me. “Don’t sell me your solution, solve my problem.”
    7. 7. Breaking Down the Agile Misconception Problem: Agile as a term has fundamentally changed in the minds of our customers Solution: Don’t talk about agile Outcome: No baggage and honesty
    8. 8. BEGINNING A DISCUSSION OF AGILE TRANSFORMATION Problem: We are selling the solution not fixing the problem. Solution: Listen to customer needs Vocalize your understanding Sell the problem Outcome: Shared Understanding
    9. 9. Thinking Seeing Gain Hearing Feeling Pain Being John Malkovich… The CFO
    10. 10. Their Problems • Predictability • Time to ROI • Quality • Economics • Adaptability • Risk Reduction
    11. 11. Gaining Permission To Coach The Problem: They aren't listening... Yet The Solution: Discovering the desired outcomes together The Outcome: Collaborating on a solution
    12. 12. Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent
    13. 13. Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management System
    14. 14. Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Solution
    15. 15. Irrational Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management Systems
    16. 16. Irrational Become Predictable Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management Systems
    17. 17. Irrational Become Predictable Reduce Time to ROI Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management Systems
    18. 18. Irrational Become Predictable Reduce Time to ROI Maximize Economic Return Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management Systems
    19. 19. Getting to The Trusted Discussion Problem: That’s great, but we have no idea how to get there Solution: Drive toward the Business Goals with Agile principles Don't be a hypocrite, be consistent Outcome: Forming a trusted relationship with a shared vision
    20. 20. How does Agile Work? Small Teams deliver increments of value Backlog prioritized by value At scale, the backlog need to be coordinated and we need to address integration
    21. 21. Lot’s of Teams
    22. 22. Scrum of…
    23. 23. Scrum of… Scrum Masters?
    24. 24. Scrum of… Product Owners?
    25. 25. Scrum of… Anyone or None?
    26. 26. We need a Value Structure And Guidance
    27. 27. Done Develop and Test Ready To Build Detailed Planning Release Targeting Feasibility Study Market Research New Concept Feature Complete Integration Testing Develop and Test Story Review Story Mapping Feature Breakdown Story Done Task Done Task In Process Task Ready Story Backlog KANBAN FEATURE STORY EPICS KANBAN SCRUM Clarity MVP Accountability Guidance can be Governance
    28. 28. Remember • Fixed teams • Reduce batch size
    29. 29. What Is Needed To Move? Irrational Become Predictable Predictive Adaptive Emergent Convergent Management Systems
    30. 30. Steps to Start the Agile Conversation • Break down the agile misconceptions • Sell the problem • Listen to customer needs • Vocalize your understanding • Discover the desired outcomes together • Drive toward the Business Goals with Agile principles • Don't be a hypocrite, be consistent
    31. 31. Tim Wise Enterprise Agile Coach tim@leadingagile.com twitter.com/timswise linkedin.com/in/timwise www.leadingagile.com facebook.com/leadingagile

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