Volunteer, I hear! October 2013

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Half day open training event held in Hamilton, Ontario.

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Volunteer, I hear! October 2013

  1. 1. Volunteer, I hear! by Toronto Training and HR October 2013
  2. 2. CONTENTS 5-6 7-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 17-20 21-23 24-25 26-28 29-30 31-32 33-34 35-36 37-38 39-44 45-46 47-48 49-50 Definitions Starting an employee volunteer program Elements of a successful volunteer program Volunteering project characteristics and categories Motives that underlie volunteering Why should your workplace volunteer? Benefits for the employee Drill 2010 survey Dollars and doers McClelland’s theory Organizational characteristics which make volunteering work Techniques to improve Techniques to sustain Young people and volunteering Swiss volunteering Case studies Conclusion and questions Page 2
  3. 3. Introduction Page 3
  4. 4. Introduction to Toronto Training and HR Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden 10 years in banking 10 years in training and human resources Freelance practitioner since 2006 The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers Page 4
  5. 5. Definition Page 5
  6. 6. Definition • Volunteering • Types of volunteering program Page 6
  7. 7. Starting an employee volunteer program Page 7
  8. 8. Starting an employee volunteer program 1 of 3 • What will the volunteering policy look like? • Why has your organization decided to support the community in this way? • What are the objectives? • Are there any restrictions on the types of activities people can do? • Will you use specialist thirdparty organizations to help? Page 8
  9. 9. Starting an employee volunteer program 2 of 3 • Will there be any budget available for reimbursing employees for any costs associated with volunteering? • Will there be funds or in-kind support available to contribute to the volunteering program? • Will the organization extend workers’ compensation coverage to their people while they volunteer? Page 9
  10. 10. Starting an employee volunteer program 3 of 3 • When will a health & safety risk assessment be undertaken? • How, when and by whom will the program be evaluated? • Is there a good fit? • Are incentives provided? • How is success evaluated? Page 10
  11. 11. Elements of a successful volunteer program Page 11
  12. 12. Elements of a successful volunteer program • Planning • Recruitment, interviewing and screening • Orientation and training • Supervision and evaluation • Recognition Page 12
  13. 13. Volunteering project categories and characteristics Page 13
  14. 14. Volunteering project categories and characteristics • Task characteristics • Social characteristics • Knowledge characteristics Page 14
  15. 15. Motives that underlie volunteering Page 15
  16. 16. Motives that underlie volunteering • • • • • • Pro-social Belonging Self-enhancement Self-protective Developmental Career Page 16
  17. 17. Why should your workplace volunteer? Page 17
  18. 18. Why should your workplace volunteer? 1 of 3 • To make a difference to the community in a way that changes lives for the better • Raise awareness of what your organization does by connecting and communicating across sectors • Discover hidden talents of your staff through new experiences, approaches and ways of connecting Page 18
  19. 19. Why should your workplace volunteer? 2 of 3 • Have fun and gain satisfaction in an alternative setting to the normal workplace • Inspire others through the enthusiasm, generosity and can-do attitude of your employees • Build new relationships with community groups, their volunteers and clients Page 19
  20. 20. Why should your workplace volunteer? 3 of 3 • Strengthen existing relationships by employees connecting in new ways with colleagues • Learn something new by experiencing work in the community sector • Increase health and wellbeing of your employees and the community. • Help stretch and save the time and resources of community organizations and enable increased levels of service delivery
  21. 21. Benefits for the employee Page 21
  22. 22. Benefits for the employee 1 of 2 • A sense of personal satisfaction, fun and fulfilment • New learning experiences outside the normal job parameters • New and more positive perceptions of career, workplace, peers and management teams • Opportunities to interact with people from other areas of the organization leading to improved communication and teamwork Page 22
  23. 23. Benefits for the employee 2 of 2 • Opportunities to meet new people and explore new situations and challenges • Providing opportunities to create pathways to community involvement for employees reaching retirement age or considering part-time employment options Page 23
  24. 24. Drill Page 24
  25. 25. Drill Page 25
  26. 26. 2010 survey Page 26
  27. 27. 2010 survey 1 of 2 • % of Canadian adults who made a financial donation • Amount donated in CAD • % of Canadian adults who donated time • Amount of hours donated • Average $ per donor • Average hours per donor • Donations per province Page 27
  28. 28. 2010 survey 2 of 2 • % of Canadian adults volunteering per province • Hours volunteered by Canadian adults per province • Donors and donations • Volunteers and hours volunteered • Personal and economic characteristics plus age groupsdollars and time Page 28
  29. 29. Dollars and doers Page 29
  30. 30. Dollars and doers • • • • What is it? Campbell’s Soup Exxon Mobil IBM Page 30
  31. 31. McClelland’s theory Page 31
  32. 32. McClelland’s theory Motivations Achievement Affiliation Page 32 Influence
  33. 33. Organizational characteristics which make volunteering work Page 33
  34. 34. Organizational characteristics which make volunteering work • Lay the foundation through the mission and vision of the organization • Combine inspiring leadership with effective management • Build understanding and collaboration • Learn, grow and change Page 34
  35. 35. Techniques to improve Page 35
  36. 36. Techniques to improve • • • • Talk about it Keep track Collect feedback Strive for best practice Page 36
  37. 37. Techniques to sustain Page 37
  38. 38. Techniques to sustain • Adapt • Plan for succession • Spread the good news Page 38
  39. 39. Young people and volunteering Page 39
  40. 40. Young people and volunteering 1 of 5 • Career-focused, flexible and receptive to new ideas • More open-minded • Energetic and enthusiastic • Technologically savvy • Prefer peer camaraderie • In many instances affected by mandatory community service requirements • Seeing volunteering as a bridge • Sensitive to perceived age discrimination
  41. 41. Young people and volunteering 2 of 5 BARRIERS • Lack of time • Inability to make a long-term commitment • Not being asked • Unsure how to become involved • Feeling that their opinions and insights are not valued, respected or taken into account • Organizations’ perception that young people need services and help
  42. 42. Young people and volunteering 3 of 5 EXAMPLES OF YOUNG PERSONFRIENDLY VOLUNTEER TASKS • Tasks that can be done virtually • Activities that can be done in pairs or groups • Opportunities that allow the volunteer to learn job-related skills Page 42
  43. 43. Young people and volunteering 4 of 5 IMPROVING THE VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE BY: • Promoting volunteerism where young people will see it • Building meaningful relationships • Capitalizing on technology options • Being sensitive to differences • Being respectful about the tasks and roles that are assigned to young people • Being flexible and accommodating Page 43
  44. 44. Young people and volunteering 5 of 5 IMPROVING THE VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE BY (CONTINUED): • Offering benefits and incentives • Communicating feedback to young volunteers regularly and constructively • Clearly outlining the purpose of the proposed young people volunteer activity Page 44
  45. 45. Swiss volunteering Page 45
  46. 46. Swiss volunteering • • • • Introduction Hands-on projects Hearts projects Skills-based projects • Increase in skills-based projects • Case studies • Skills-based v hands-on • Current trends and the future Page 46
  47. 47. Case studies Page 47
  48. 48. Case studies Page 48
  49. 49. Conclusion and questions Page 49
  50. 50. Conclusion and questions Summary Videos Questions Page 50

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