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Trinity Kings World Leadership Services
October 25, 2016, 03:32 pm
Family Franchise Systems data solves
Displacement and d...
I agree. Each time a city is ripped apart by a police shooting of an African American, I'm
asked for a quote as a spokesma...
policy at the core of all publicly delivered services. And in Pittsburgh, Police Chief
Cameron Mclay issued a public apolo...
Trinity Kings World Leadership Services
(Genesis 17:6 "Kings Will Come from You!")
Families of Wisdom Ministry to Families...
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Trinity Kings World Leadership Services: Family Franchise Systems Data solves Displacement and disenfranchised problems that contribute to police tensions...

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Trinity Kings World Leadership Services: Family Franchise Systems Data solves Displacement and disenfranchised problems that contribute to police tensions...

  1. 1. Trinity Kings World Leadership Services October 25, 2016, 03:32 pm Family Franchise Systems data solves Displacement and disenfranchisement problems that contribute to police tensions By Clarence Anthony, contributor 0 Getty Images If the presidential candidates won't talk about the state of race relations and the tension between police and the communities they serve, those of us who deal with this crisis on a daily basis wiII have to step up to the task That's my conclusion now that the presidential debates are over and the election of the next President is practically around the corner. The most important public statement on this issue in recent days was made not by a politician, but by the president of the International Association of Police Chiefs, Terrence Cunningham, who issued a formal apolory for the r'historical mistreatment" of racial minorities. Speaking before the group's annual conference in San Diego, Cunningham, the chief of the Welleslev Police Department, said that law enforcement officers have been the'6face of oppression for far too many of our fellow citizens." He called mistrust between police and minorities the o'fundamental issue" facing police today.
  2. 2. I agree. Each time a city is ripped apart by a police shooting of an African American, I'm asked for a quote as a spokesman for the nation's cities. Itos a task I find difficult because I - like many Americans - want to move beyond the rhetoric and find real solutions to these deep-seated challenges. But, I know that until we can strengthen trust between minority communities and the institutions that are supposed to serve them, we will continue to have unrest. City leaders have an important role to play. They can start by having conversations with communities to foster understanding. It begins with creating a place that everyone can call "home." Think about what the concept of home means to you. It's a place where you can wave to your neighbors, have a well-paying job and send your kids to good schools. There may be a park or a library down the street, and stores that are welcoming, clean and safe. The police are seen as part of the community, and you certainly don't tense up when they pass you on the street. Now, imagine that's all gone. How invested would you be in a place where you don't feel like you belong? You don't own or rent a decent place to lay your head, there are no sustainable jobs and public facilities are neglected. No one you know owns a small business, not even a neighborhood store. Hardly anyone who looks like you is on the school board, on the housing authority or on the public services commission. If a community is underrepresented, and its needs not served, then its residents wiII not be vested in the city as a whole - it won't feel like home. When the tragic events occurred in Charlotte, Ferguson and Baltimore, it's not hard to see why the tension boiled over. These cities have people who feel that they are not part of a community; that they are not "real" citizens with a voice in government. This is a dangerous misapprehension that city leaders have the power to change. We can respond to racial tensions in our communities and identiff the systemic barriers that sustain racial injustice in our nation's cities by applying a racial equity lens to a wide range of policies, initiatives, programs and budgets-and not just high-profile flashpoints like police departments, public safety and the courts. In this way, city leaders can be more thoughtful about the power, influence and responsibility they have to build inclusive communities. Elected officials have a responsibility to communicate across cultures, to convene difficult conversations and to lead in new directions. Sometimes this energy comes down from the convening power of leadership. Sometimes it bubbles up from the most elemental levels of local government. For example, cities should examine the appointment process for city advisory boards and councils. From parks and recreation departments to tourist development councils, every policy board that advises elected leadership should represent the diversity of that city. Local leaders should also review their ordinances and policies to make sure they are inclusive, not discriminatory. Recently, the Fairfax, Virginia County Board of Supervisors adopted the One Fairfax Resolution, directing the development of a racial and social equity
  3. 3. policy at the core of all publicly delivered services. And in Pittsburgh, Police Chief Cameron Mclay issued a public apology for the o6horrible, unjust" history between police and communities of color and implemented a training program to teach, in his words, 6(ethical decision-making as the predominant decision-making model within the organization." The change we need will not occur overnight; it will take patience and time to build the trust that our cities deserve. We need to reach a level of trust and understanding necessary for city leaders to take action against the injustices, the inequality and the creation of opportunities for aII of their citizens. If we can rise to that challenge, we'll have more people in our communities saying,'oThis is our neighborhood; we own this." We have to create cities that all cittzens can call home. Anthony is the executive director of the National Leagae of Cities. He served as the mayor of South Bay, Flfor 24 years. Follow him on Twilter @ceqnthonvSh.
  4. 4. Trinity Kings World Leadership Services (Genesis 17:6 "Kings Will Come from You!") Families of Wisdom Ministry to Families (Genesis 12:3 "Til all Families of the Earth are Blessed") Vision: To Train Equip Families to be Good Stewards of God's Kingdom. *FAMILY FRANCHISING SYSTEMS: ''A PROACTIVE WAY OF ENTERING INTO RELATIONSHIPS'' "A Proactive Way of Solving Problems In The Family, Education, Religion, Business, Government, Arts & Entertainment, And Media Systems."(The Branches of Societies, Nations, & World) "A Proactive way of Solving Problems In The Family, church, Community, Country & World"(The Foundations, Roots,& Systems of Societies, Nations, & World) Like A Tree... *Invest in people by training, equipping, and emporyering...And the profits will follow..."We can do this for families" "'we have to be more Proactive in Protecting our Families" *Franchising Fatherhoodo Grandfatherhood, Great- Grandfatherhood *Franchising Motherhood, Grandmotherhood, Great- Grandmotherhood *Human Capital Industry is where all the Wealth is... *Where Faith & Culture Meet *Created by Air Force Veterans... *Good People Business drives Good Business... *Just like Coach in sports, you can look at your stat sheet and see where you and your family members need training, improVement, & adjustments that need to be made to improve your life game. contact 7 24 252 517 4...email : familyfranchise 1 @aol. corn

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