Welcome to the T883
Business Operations: Delivering Value
Online Tutorial 1
By Katharine Jewitt
Email: kjewitt@skillkick.c...
Agenda
• Introductions and Audio Checks 10:00 – 10:10
• Value for Stakeholders 10:10 – 10:25
• Products = goods + services...
Housekeeping
• To review progress so far and answer queries
• Build your understanding of block 1
• Help you get to grips ...
Introduction: Ice Breaker
• Name
• Town where you live
• If you are working, who do you work for and what is your
role?
• ...
T883 Components
• T883 course website and forums
• Study Calendar
• Assignment Booklet
• T883 Study Guide – Read this firs...
2.1 Business operations: function or
process
2.2 Business operations: a
transformation process
2.3 Managing across interfa...
Block 1 Section 1 Summary
Activity 1: Value for Stakeholders10:10 – 10:25
We are going to take the example of Tesco for this activity. You may want ...
Block 1 Section 4 Stakeholder Value
Analysing Stakeholders
Stakeholder Value
Value to the organisation
Value to Customer
Value to Employees
Value to Society
Creating Stakeholder Value
1. Government demands compliance with regulation which tends to increase
operating costs
2. Customers demand individualise...
Block 1 Section 4 Summary
Block 1 Section 4 Summary
Block 1 Section 4 Summary
Activity 2: Products = goods + services
10:25-10:40
• T883 defines ‘product; as
a combination of goods
and services. It is...
Block 1 Section 5 Summary
Block 1 Section 5 Summary
Block 1 Section 5 Summary
Block 1 Section 5 Summary
See Chapter 5 of the Reader
Block 1 Section 5 Summary
Developing Effective Performance
at Work
The Basic Transformation Model
Activity 3: The Transformation Model
1. As a group construct a transformation model (input-output diagram) to
represent as...
Activity 3
General Thoughts on Activity 3
Even having analysed a task to this degree of detail, there may be more to it than meets th...
Block 1 Section 2 Summary
Block 1 Section 2 Summary
Block 1 Section 2 Summary
Block 1 Section 2 Summary
Activity 4: Product-Process Interaction 10:55 – 11:10
• The aim here is to show how processes and products interact eg. Ho...
Looking Ahead following Activity 4
• The importance of the appropriate design of operations systems
is a key point that re...
Block 1 Section 6 Summary
Block 1 Section 6 Summary
Block 1 Section 6 Summary
Block 1 Section 7 Summary
Block 1 Section 7 Summary
Block 1 Section 7 Summary
Block 1 Section 7 Summary
For completeness Block 1 Section 3 Summary
Preparation for the TMA01
• See Table 1 in the Assignment Booklet page 6
• Which of the assessment criteria listed in Tabl...
TMA01 Preparation
• Explicit application of relevant models, concepts and
techniques taught in block 1 to analyse the orga...
TMA01 Question 1
• For Question 1, provide a concise description of the organisation’s
business and its strategy to achiev...
TMA01 Question 2
• This draws upon Block 1 Section 4.6
• Explain what CSR entails and the sort of objectives it might
have...
Review, Questions, Feedback
Goodbye and see you in the forum
soon!
T883 tutorial 1
T883 tutorial 1
T883 tutorial 1
T883 tutorial 1
T883 tutorial 1
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T883 tutorial 1

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T883 Online Tutorial 1 held Sunday 28th November 2010 10am - 11.30am

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T883 tutorial 1

  1. 1. Welcome to the T883 Business Operations: Delivering Value Online Tutorial 1 By Katharine Jewitt Email: kjewitt@skillkick.com
  2. 2. Agenda • Introductions and Audio Checks 10:00 – 10:10 • Value for Stakeholders 10:10 – 10:25 • Products = goods + services 10:25 – 10:40 • The transformation model 10:40 – 10:55 • Product-Process Interaction 10:55 – 11:10 • Towards TMA01 11:10 – 11:25 • Review, Questions, Feedback 11:25 – 11:30
  3. 3. Housekeeping • To review progress so far and answer queries • Build your understanding of block 1 • Help you get to grips with some of the course fundamentals • Provides an excellent opportunity for networking with your fellow students and work together • Offer practical advice for TMA01 • Timekeeping • Mobile Phones • Questions / Interruptions Learning Objectives
  4. 4. Introduction: Ice Breaker • Name • Town where you live • If you are working, who do you work for and what is your role? • Why are you studying this course? • How are you finding things so far? • How far into the course are you? • Hobbies, Leisure, Interesting fact
  5. 5. T883 Components • T883 course website and forums • Study Calendar • Assignment Booklet • T883 Study Guide – Read this first! • Blocks 1, 2 and 3 • DVD • Operations Management text book • Operations Management A strategic Approach A Reader • Cases • Four Resource Packs – Making the Case, People in Organisations, Systems Thinking and Business Operations • Direct links to Library and other business resources • Sample Examination Paper • Your Tutor, Your Mentor, Your fellow students, Your Colleagues, You!
  6. 6. 2.1 Business operations: function or process 2.2 Business operations: a transformation process 2.3 Managing across interfaces 2.4 The role of technology 2.5 Summary 3.1 Delivering business strategy 3.2 Implementing strategy and delivering business excellence 3.3 Driving business strategy 3.4 Summary 4.1 Stakeholder analysis 4.2 What is value? 4.3 Value to the organisation 4.4 Value to the customer 4.5 Value to employees 4.6 Value to society 4.7 Creating stakeholder value 4.8 Performance objectives 4.9 Summary 5.1 The nature of the product 5.2 The service economy 5.3 The importance of product innovation 5.4 Product-process interactions 5.5 Summary 6.1 How to be lean and agile 6.2 Matching supply and demand 6.3 Disintermediation 6.4 Summary OPERATIONS, TECHNOLOGY & STAKEHOLDER VALUE OPERATIONS, TECHNOLOGY & STAKEHOLDER VALUE 2 The process view of business operations 4 Stakeholder value 6 Value from processes 3 Operations and business strategy 5 Value from products 8 Conclusion 7 Process technology 7.1 What is technology? 7.2 Types of technology 7.3 How technology adds value 7.4 Managing technology for competitive advantage 7.5 Technology and organisations 7.6 Summary 1 Introduction Block 1 Overview
  7. 7. Block 1 Section 1 Summary
  8. 8. Activity 1: Value for Stakeholders10:10 – 10:25 We are going to take the example of Tesco for this activity. You may want to try this on your own with your own organisation or one you know well, such as a school or hospital. •As a group identify a broad range of stakeholders See Section 4.1 of Block 1 page 62 •What does each stakeholder group expect or want from the organisation? Value is very subjective and all stakeholders will have a different perspective on what they place value on. What are the various elements of ‘value’ that the organisation should be concerned with delivering? See Section 4.2 of Block 2 •Are their objectives conflicting? How might these conflicts be managed in practice?
  9. 9. Block 1 Section 4 Stakeholder Value
  10. 10. Analysing Stakeholders
  11. 11. Stakeholder Value
  12. 12. Value to the organisation
  13. 13. Value to Customer
  14. 14. Value to Employees
  15. 15. Value to Society
  16. 16. Creating Stakeholder Value
  17. 17. 1. Government demands compliance with regulation which tends to increase operating costs 2. Customers demand individualised service which also increases costs 3. Managers seek to reduce costs to maximise profits or to ensure survival • Stakeholder mapping can be a useful exercise see Block 1 section 4.1 pages 62-64 and the power matrix on p.67. The significance of stakeholder power emerges. • Conflicts are potentially ‘resolvable’ by, for example: 1. Giving most weight to the most powerful stakeholders 2. Innovating through technology to eliminate trade offs (eg. ATMs enhance some aspects of customer service whilst simultaneously reducing costs) 3. Improving all aspects of performance so that the trade offs become insignificant 4. Designing processes that integrate all the various objectives (eg product design that incorporates design for minimum environmental impact as well as for ease of manufacture Managing Stakeholder Conflict Summary
  18. 18. Block 1 Section 4 Summary
  19. 19. Block 1 Section 4 Summary
  20. 20. Block 1 Section 4 Summary
  21. 21. Activity 2: Products = goods + services 10:25-10:40 • T883 defines ‘product; as a combination of goods and services. It is hard to think of any product that is totally devoid of service content, and services are forming an increasingly significant proportion of economic activity. Even traditionally good based industries are becoming more service-orientated (see exercise 10, block 1, section 5 p.116 • In this activity, work in a group to Identify the tangible goods and intangible service elements of a Big Mac meal (Even the most basic goods items will have service aspects associated with distribution). (You can also try thinking of a product from your own organisation) • What proportion of the value perceived by customers is provided by the tangible goods element & what proportion by the intangible service element? This is difficult if not impossible to assess objectively! See p.111 Block 1 Section 5 Figure 31 • How important is the service element of the product in determining the producer’s competitive position? (e.g. in the case of commodity type goods, then service might be the differentiating factor causing customers to choose one supplier over another). • How do producers and customers assess the quality of the goods element versus the service element of the product? • You’ll look more at this in Block 2 – objective technical performance measurement is often used in the case of goods and subjective assessments in the case of services.
  22. 22. Block 1 Section 5 Summary
  23. 23. Block 1 Section 5 Summary
  24. 24. Block 1 Section 5 Summary
  25. 25. Block 1 Section 5 Summary See Chapter 5 of the Reader
  26. 26. Block 1 Section 5 Summary
  27. 27. Developing Effective Performance at Work The Basic Transformation Model
  28. 28. Activity 3: The Transformation Model 1. As a group construct a transformation model (input-output diagram) to represent as fully as possible a sandwich shop business. See Block 1 Section 2.2 page 15. 2. Identify the various input and output types (primary, secondary, tertiary – see page 15 for descriptions), the interfaces internal and external to the business and relevant feedback loops. 3. Suggest a specific set of performance objectives for the system. The ‘process’ approach is crucial to our understanding of task management in modern organisations. One of the simplest ways of explaining the process approach is through the diagram known as the transformation model (or the input/output diagram). Any job or task can be analysed (or broken down into smaller parts) using the process approach, by first identifying its inputs and its final outputs, and then by examining the activities that cause the transformation from one to the other. These activities are known as sub-processes. Analysis in this way helps us to understand how we might improve the performance of the task in some way. Using the process approach we can analyse the job as having the inputs, sub-processes and outputs
  29. 29. Activity 3
  30. 30. General Thoughts on Activity 3 Even having analysed a task to this degree of detail, there may be more to it than meets the eye. If you are the consumer of the sandwich, it is very likely that you will only make (and eat) one or two before your hunger is satisfied. If you are catering for a large group or running a lunchtime sandwich making business, you have to produce a large number of sandwiches, often in quite a short timescale. You may well employ your staff or volunteers in specialist roles: one person will butter the bread, another will grate the cheese, another will prepare the salad and another (if you have that many) will assemble the final sandwich, not forgetting to package and store them appropriately so they stay fresh until eaten. This specialisation of job roles to deal with sub-processes, known as task specialisation , should save you some time or at least make sure the required volume is delivered at the appropriate time. In other words, it should improve the efficiency of the process so that higher volumes of inputs can be transformed into higher levels of outputs in a relatively short time. However, there still remains a potential difficulty. What if no one wants to eat a cheese salad sandwich on brown bread? It is a common source of irritation, I suspect, to those of us who make lunchtime sandwiches for other members of our families to find them uneaten at the end of the day. For a sandwich making business, however, unsold sandwiches are an expensive waste of their inputs. They have been efficient enough to produce the required number of sandwiches, in the time given, to satisfy their consumers’ hunger. Unfortunately, the consumers themselves do not feel satisfied with what is being offered. In other words, while they have been efficient, they have not necessarily been effective in satisfying their consumer. Hence, for many businesses and organisations nowadays, it is important they gain an understanding of their customers’ or users’ needs when planning the production of their outputs. And even for employees, the needs of their managers and colleagues must be borne in mind as the internal customers of their work output. Their effectiveness can then be judged in terms of the satisfied needs of the customer or user, not just the end product. Did you, for example, use any tools or equipment in your task? Or did you mix or assemble any components or ingredients, as we did in our sandwich example? These are known as physical resource inputs. This leaves us with the question of who pays for the physical and human resources and how. It may be your employing organisation who pays, the business you run, or from your own pocket. Whoever it is, the money must be found, and this represents the financial resource input. As for outputs, we have already identified the end product or service as one key output. We have also recognised that effective processes lead to the ‘output’ of a satisfied customer. There are often other unintended outputs which should not be forgotten. In our sandwich example, as in all work activity, there are: waste products e.g. bits of limp salad, discarded packaging, etc. which need to be cleared up; other tasks generated e.g. washing up the equipment used and the selling of the sandwich; and potentially useful by-products e.g. the breadcrumbs could be used in other recipes.
  31. 31. Block 1 Section 2 Summary
  32. 32. Block 1 Section 2 Summary
  33. 33. Block 1 Section 2 Summary
  34. 34. Block 1 Section 2 Summary
  35. 35. Activity 4: Product-Process Interaction 10:55 – 11:10 • The aim here is to show how processes and products interact eg. How the design and management of processes impacts on products as perceived by customers and on other aspects of stakeholder value. The notions of operations strategy and design are also introduced. • As a group take the example of apples from a supermarket and identify the processes that need to be in place in order for the customer to benefit from the product (top level eg. Grow apples, supermarket display, checkout) Decide on 5 top levels. • For each of the 5 processes, how does its design and day-to-day management impact on the value that the customer perceives in the product? • How does each process impact on other aspects of stakeholder value? Eg. Compliance with regulations (government) Giving employee job satisfaction (employees) Profit generation (owners, senior managers) • Of the various aspects of process management that have been identified as important to deliver customer & other stakeholder value, which are ‘strategic’ issues and which are ‘operational’?
  36. 36. Looking Ahead following Activity 4 • The importance of the appropriate design of operations systems is a key point that receives particular emphasis in Block 2 • An extension of Activity 4 is the role that technology plays (covered in Block 1 Section 7 and explored further in Block 2 – how does its use in the various processes affect the customer’s perception of the product and how does it impact on other aspects of stakeholder value? You might want to think about the important of managing aspects of the system beyond the technology hardware / software in order to reap the maximum operational and strategic rewards from technology implementation – see the discussion of the IT productivity paradox in Block 1 section 7.5 box 23 (page 141), as an example.
  37. 37. Block 1 Section 6 Summary
  38. 38. Block 1 Section 6 Summary
  39. 39. Block 1 Section 6 Summary
  40. 40. Block 1 Section 7 Summary
  41. 41. Block 1 Section 7 Summary
  42. 42. Block 1 Section 7 Summary
  43. 43. Block 1 Section 7 Summary
  44. 44. For completeness Block 1 Section 3 Summary
  45. 45. Preparation for the TMA01 • See Table 1 in the Assignment Booklet page 6 • Which of the assessment criteria listed in Table 1 of the assignment booklet does TMA01 give you the opportunity to demonstrate • For each of these criteria, how will you go about ensuring that your work demonstrates them to a high standard? • Question 1 of each TMA is designed to reflect the importance in this field of developing capability of practical application of ‘theoretical’ concepts. You are asked to apply what you have learnt to a real-life context. • Question 2 of each TMA is a typical exam question. This tests knowledge and understanding of block specific topics. TMA01 Due 16th December 12 Noon UK local time
  46. 46. TMA01 Preparation • Explicit application of relevant models, concepts and techniques taught in block 1 to analyse the organisation and its situation • Accurate and appropriate referencing • Writing style and presentation • Use the ‘language’ of the course in expressing your points. • Remember your tutor is marking you on your knowledge of T883
  47. 47. TMA01 Question 1 • For Question 1, provide a concise description of the organisation’s business and its strategy to achieve its organisational goals. Review your activities from this tutorial and the various elements of value and performance levels. Look back to activity 3 from this tutorial and include a transformation diagram. Remember Question 1 is worth 10 marks and must be concise – 200 words excluding the diagram. • Refer back to this tutorial’s activity 1 for Question 2. Remember to take a systematic approach • For Question 3 refer to Block 1 Section 3 and demonstrate your analysis. Remember to talk in terms of the course and the block. See also Block 1 Section 7 on technology for this question • For Question 4 see activity 14 on page 147 of Block 1. Don’t get bogged down in a huge search. Click on ‘ejournals’ from the right hand side of the library home page. Type in a keyword eg. “operations” in the search box and select ‘contains’ and click “go” and then have a browse through the results.
  48. 48. TMA01 Question 2 • This draws upon Block 1 Section 4.6 • Explain what CSR entails and the sort of objectives it might have • Explain how Operations Management might deliver some of these objectives • Explain the associated constraints and pitfalls
  49. 49. Review, Questions, Feedback
  50. 50. Goodbye and see you in the forum soon!

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