UC-NRLF    SM E72
THE LIBRARY       OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA       PRESENTED BYPROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID   AND MRS. PRUDENCE W.   KOFOID
GLIMPSESNATURAL HISTORY.
BERLIN W.
FRONTISPIECE.
GHMPSES                         ^NAT iTf        What   prodigies can     Power Divine perform,        More grand than     ...
LO.VDONJOSEPH RJCKERBY, PRINTER,    SHBRBOURN-LANK.
Hfc                             PREFACE.THE     intention of this simple            little   Work   is   so obvious,that  ...
CONTENTS.              ......           .......The Walrus and FlyGalls                                                    ...
vi                     CONTENTS.                                       Page.Evergreens                              1   K/...
THE WALRUS.              Page   1.
GLIMPSES OF NATURAL HISTORY.                THE WALRUS AND          FLY.                            AUNT.Do you      recol...
2                          THE WALRUS AND           FLY.to    me.     How    can      I discover       any likeness betwee...
THE WALRUS AND            FLY.                3all others (with very few exceptions) are guided, andthus to sustain their ...
4                       THE WALRUS AND           FLY.will serve to      show how, by       this    means, we discover thep...
THE WALRUS AND           FLY.                     5                                AUNT.  Very   well   :                 ...
6                        THE WALRUS AND           FLY.                                       AUNT.    It is to       Sir  ...
THE WALRUS    AND FLY.                      7times to   makethe apparatus i have described visible,while that of the walru...
8                         THE WALRUS AND    FLY.face.Sea-anemonies, again, are attached by the samemeans they are such sof...
GALLS.                               MARY.HERE    one of those curious mossy tufts on this rose*        isbranch which I h...
10                                GALLS.sufficient   even   for   a very tiny insect to have entered by,and   I should ima...
GALLS.                          11have accounted for their formation in a more rationalway.      They       find that they...
12                                   GALLS.makes a puncture, and then introduces her egg, and ina few hours it becomes sur...
GALLS.                                13comprehend, and            it   seems very wonderful even          if,    as issup...
14                             GALLS.any gaDs on oak-leaves              I       shall   open them, that                Im...
GALLS.                            15eaten prepared with sugar, and have an aromatic, acidflavour,     which   is   very re...
16                         SNAILS.                             MARY.    How many snails there are crawling about this morn...
Page   16.
SNAILS.                             17                               MARY.  Pray what does that mean         ?     I do no...
18                                 SNAILS.hardened, the animal retires, expels a portion of air fromits lungs, and forms a...
SNAILS.                            19their self-formed prisons,   and do not reappear      till   thespring. It appears, f...
20                              SNAILS.also requisite.    They      feel,   very sensibly, either extremesof heat or cold,...
SNAILS.                                21                               AUNT.  That    is    a subject which has given ris...
22                              SNAILS.                                AUNT.     It is the   helix pomatia, (edible snail,...
CHATEAU DARQUES.                    Page   22.
SNAILS.                                      23ders the situation of this venerable ruin extremely im-posing.        It is...
24                            SNAILS. de Mayenne.       The   result of this battle      may be    consi-dered as having b...
SNAILS.                         25posure, and not betraying, either by his countenance ormanner, the slightest perturbatio...
THE CAMEL.                            MARY.                                   HAVE   been thinking a                      ...
THE GIRAFFE.               Page   27.
THE CAMEL.                                    27upon     it.     This useful creature            is,   indeed, a striking ...
28                           THE CAMEL.                                 MARY.     That   is,   indeed, very extraordinary ...
THE CAMEL.                          29which require little moisture, placed in dry situations            ;and again, those...
30                          THE CAMEL.from their stem and branches, and twine themselvesround the neighbouring plants of f...
THE CAMEL.                                    31insects       mode     of travelling gives            it    great    comma...
32                            THE CAMEL.tread on a beetle,you may see it as you pass on runningbriskly away, unhurt by a p...
THE CAMEL.                                   33                                            each joint or division of the  ...
34                           THE CAMEL.tree before us does his       hand       holding by a projectiontill   he draws his...
35                         THE SUNFLOWER.                                  MARY.You   have lately made           me       ...
36                           THE SUNFLOWER.day, the saintfoin, did you not know that the fields wesee sown of it were inte...
THE SUNFLOWER.                                         37use  they make a good powder for cattle. The dry stalks      ;bur...
38                        THE SUNFLOWER.                               AUNT.     I   am happy you     have, for   it is   ...
THE SUNFLOWER.                     39very remarkable property of potash is the formation ofglass by its fusion with silici...
40                           CHARCOAL.                                 AUNT.GOOD morning, my            dear.  You need no...
CHARCOAL.                          41                                      MARY.  No, indeed I do not ; but what I have se...
42                            CHARCOAL.delicate operation than I       am    going to describe to you,as I shall confine m...
CHARCOAL.                              43                                           MARY.      Then       the fames of cha...
44                                     CHARCOAL.what        is   so injurious to inhale should be                    whole...
CHARCOAL.                    45                           MARY.  Surprising   !that anything so black, heavy, and dull-loo...
46                                SPONGE.                                   MARY.As    was preparing to come out this morn...
SPONGES.           Page   46.
SPONGE.                                    47they possessed animal life.      Then it was conjecturedthat each cell, or ho...
48                              SPONGE.                                AUNT.     On   the contrary, I rather believe    yo...
SPONGE.                               49of his descent through the water.    By this means hesaves unnecessary expenditure...
50                            SPONGE.subject without reverting to the important office per-formed by some tribes of marine...
MADREPORE.             Page   51.
SPONGE.                           51at firstappear insurmountable. The active little ani-mals to which I allude are the wo...
52                                SPONGE.seas,   and a mass of it (frequently so            large as to endangerthe safety...
SPONGE*                             53witness the scene they depict.             Over many of them thewater   is   so clea...
54                              SPONGE.But I must not allow the beauty of the reefs to draw mefrom the mode of their conve...
SPONGE.                         55                             AUNT.  So much    so, that if   we had not     the testimon...
56                                  SPONGE*there form burrows for themselves, or, as in                              some ...
SPONGE.                      57and wide sea also   ;                        wherein are things, creeping thingsinnumerable...
58RUST INDIAN-RUBBER LEAD PENCILS,                                    &c.                                   MARY.You have ...
RUST ON STEEL.                         59                                    MARY.          do not understand your answer,...
60                          RUST ON STEEL,in combustion.   This operation cannot go on without asupply  of oxygen, and in ...
INDIAN-RUBBER.                      61                                    MARY.  Then       rust   is    an oxyd, formed b...
6*2                           INDIAN-RUBBER.                                          AUNT.          Yes   ;   incisions a...
OF LEAD IN PENCILS.                              63It is   very difficult of solution, for       it   resists the   power ...
64                     OF LEAD IN PENCILS.these together form a compound, called in the languageof chemistry, carburet of ...
GUMS AND           RESINS.                       65                                       AUNT.      It is of the same gen...
()6                                GUM-ARABIC.tomed     to see      it   used   for in      England,       for sealing let...
COLOURS.                                AUNT.As   saw you drawing yesterday, it occurred to me that     Iyou had very prob...
68                          COLOURS.                             MARY.  So instead of the artist being indebted to one onl...
COLOURS.                                   69                                     MARY.     Then   these   may be called a...
70                           COLOURS.Indigofera tinctoria.        Gamboge a vegetable exuda-                              ...
PLANT-INDIGO.                Page   70.
COLOURS.                               71                                 AUNT.  Green      is   generally a compound colo...
72                     COLOURS.          you may understand how to mix it properlyrived, thatwith another.  Care must be t...
THE COTTON-TREE.                   Page   73.
73                        A TRAVELLER.                                  AUNT.Now, my      dear, I shall try if I can puzzl...
74                             A TRAVELLER.     "         In India,     my   native clime, I commenced my careeras the pro...
A TRAVELLER.                                 75selves  nay, they did not even scruple to have recourse         ;to main fo...
76                     A TRAVELLER.and we anxiously expected to follow but our turn did                                   ...
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Glimpses of nature beauty ART
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Glimpses of nature beauty ART

985 views

Published on

Glimpses of nature beauty ART

Published in: Education, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
985
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Glimpses of nature beauty ART

  1. 1. UC-NRLF SM E72
  2. 2. THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESENTED BYPROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID
  3. 3. GLIMPSESNATURAL HISTORY.
  4. 4. BERLIN W.
  5. 5. FRONTISPIECE.
  6. 6. GHMPSES ^NAT iTf What prodigies can Power Divine perform, More grand than it produces year by year, And all in sight of inattentive man ! COWPER LONDON :HARVEY AND DARTON, GRACECHURCH-STREET.
  7. 7. LO.VDONJOSEPH RJCKERBY, PRINTER, SHBRBOURN-LANK.
  8. 8. Hfc PREFACE.THE intention of this simple little Work is so obvious,that it perhaps scarcely requires a preface. Written todirect the attention of one much-loved child to thegoodness and power of God, as displayed in all histvorks, it is now offered to many, in the hope that from "these Glimpses of Natural History" they may be ledto more extended views of so boundless a subject. LONDON, 1843. M348387
  9. 9. CONTENTS. ...... .......The Walrus and FlyGalls Page. 1 9SnailsThe Camel ....... . . . . . . . .16 26Charcoal .......The Sunflower . . . . . .35 40Sponge ... ......Rust Indian-rubber . . Lead . Pencils, &c. . . . .46 58Colours ...... ....A Traveller ... 67 73Rain ...... ......Fall of the Leaf . 80 87On ...... Rooks, &c.Insect ChangesVariety in Nature . . . . . . 96 104 .115Water-Pimpernel . . . . . .125
  10. 10. vi CONTENTS. Page.Evergreens 1 K/Leaf-insects . 158MossesHorsetail .Heaths, &c, .Mother-of-l>earl
  11. 11. THE WALRUS. Page 1.
  12. 12. GLIMPSES OF NATURAL HISTORY. THE WALRUS AND FLY. AUNT.Do you recollect the description I read to you theother morning of that icy region, Spitzbergen, and ofthe animals which inhabit it ? MARY. Oh, yes, perfectly. AUNT. Then you perhaps, be able to answer the ques- will,tion I am going to ask you. What resemblance isthere between a walrus and a fly ? MARY. Really, my dear aunt, you are proposing an enigma B
  13. 13. 2 THE WALRUS AND FLY.to me. How can I discover any likeness between thatlarge, inactive, disgusting creature, and the little alertinsect I often watch with so much pleasure ? AUNT. I do not refer to their appearance, for in that thereis, indeed, no similarity. But consider what I toldyou of the habits of the walrus of its manner of moving, ;for example. Are you not now struck with any pointof resemblance ? MARY. I remember you told me the walrus can climb per-pendicular masses of ice, and I see flies ascending ourglass windows, and I should think their surface some-thing like that of the smooth, polished ice, so perhaps Ihave found out your enigma. AUNT. You have. I did not, however, propose it merely to tryyour ingenuity, but in order that I may give you anexplanation of the means by which both these creaturesare able to surmount the law by which the motions of
  14. 14. THE WALRUS AND FLY. 3all others (with very few exceptions) are guided, andthus to sustain their bodies against gravity. Beforeattempting this I must recal to your mind a subject Ialluded to in our reading yesterday, and which I pro-mised to recur to : the pressure of the atmosphere. MARY. Oh ! I have been wishing for some explanation ofthat term, for I cannot understand how it can be appliedto a fluid, as you have told me the air is so thin andtransparent, that though we are surrounded by it we canneither feel nor see it. AUNT. Our being surrounded by it is the very reason whywe do not feel it. Our bodies are so equally supportedby it on all sides, that we do not perceive any partialpressure ; but if I could remove the portion of air fromone side of body, the weight and consequent pres- mysure would be so great that I should no longer be ableto bear it. And this is proved by a machine called anair-pump, by which a vessel may be deprived of the airit contains, and a vacuum formed. A familiar instance B -2
  15. 15. 4 THE WALRUS AND FLY.will serve to show how, by this means, we discover thepressure of air. If you were to put any body, yourhand, for instance, over a jar with an opening at bothends on an air-pump, as the pump was worked youwould find a gradually increasing weight on your hand,and at length, when the operation was completed, andthe air in the jar quite exhausted, you would find itimpossible, by any exertion of force, to lift your handfrom the jar. MARY. Then, I suppose, the air above the hand presses itdown, and it cannot be raised because there is no airbelow to offer resistance. AUNT. Exactly so ; for when air is pumped in again thehand is raised with the greatest ease. But now for theapplication of what I have said to our present subject,which, I fear, this long digression will almost have madeyou forget. MARY. No, indeed ; you said that a fly and a walrus haveboth the power of walking against gravity.
  16. 16. THE WALRUS AND FLY. 5 AUNT. Very well : now, the reason of their possessing thispower is, that they are furnished with an apparatus bywhich they can form a vacuum, and adhere to the verti-cal glass or ice by atmospheric pressure. The air isexpelled from the space below their feet, and the weightof the air above their feet causes them to adhere ; but, atthe same time, they are wisely provided with muscularforce sufficient to raise their feet with the greatest ease,so that their movements arenot impeded. If youremark the flies which congregate in our houses in theautumn, you will see that they are at first very livelyand active, but that as they grow torpid they move withdifficulty, as if fastened to the window. When they arewell and active theyeasily overcome the atmosphericpressure, but as the weather becomes colder, it makesthem sickly and weak, and then this resistance is toogreat an effort for their declining strength, and you maysee them toiling along, as if their feet were too heavy forthem, nay, sometimes even sticking to the glass till theydie. MARY. Who first discovered that flies had this singular power ?
  17. 17. 6 THE WALRUS AND FLY. AUNT. It is to Sir Everard Home that we are indebted forascertaining the fact. had been suspected by former Itnaturalists, but he proved it by examination. For sometime he was in doubt about two points with which the is provided, not being able to understandfoot of the flyfor what purpose they were there. It had been imaginedthat they were inserted in the cavities of the surfaceover which the insect was walking, and thus retained itin opposition to gravity ; in this opinion, however, SirEverard Home did not agree. On examining the footof the walrus he discovered their use there it was :evident that two toes (which answer to the points in theflys foot) are used for the purpose of bringing the webclosely down upon the surface traversed, so as to enablethe animal to form a more complete vacuum, and thatthe ah* is readmitted on their being lifted up. MARY. What a difference there must be in size between thetwo feet ! AUNT. Yes, that of the fly requires magnifying one hundred
  18. 18. THE WALRUS AND FLY. 7times to makethe apparatus i have described visible,while that of the walrus must be diminished four timesto bring it within the compass of a quarto plate. MARY. Thank you, my dear aunt, for your, explanation I :shall now never see flies on our windows without recol-lecting it, and I shall observe them more closely. AUNT. There are other familiar instances in which you mayremark this power of the atmosphere. You rememberthe difficulty we found the other morning in detachingthe limpets you wished from the rock to which theywere so firmly fixed ; if you examine them you will findthat they have no apparent means adequate to resist theforce you applied to them. The edge of the shell isnot furnished with any mechanism by which to hold thesubstance on which it is placed this is, indeed, so hard ;and smooth, that it would be difficult to conceive anythat would answer the purpose. It is retained in itssituation by the formation of a vacuum below the shell,and the consequent pressure of the air on its outer sur-
  19. 19. 8 THE WALRUS AND FLY.face.Sea-anemonies, again, are attached by the samemeans they are such soft, gelatinous bodies, that it :seems as if one had only to put ones hand to the rockto gain possession of them but we find a strong resist- ;ance. You must have remarked that when you touchan anemone it immediately shrinks by this movement ;it is, no doubt, putting itself on the defensive, andexpelling the air from between it and the rock. Snails,periwinkles, &c. &c. adhere by the same means. Inthe same situations as limpets and periwinkles you willfind, very frequently, clusters of muscles, which are alsoattached to the rocks, but here observe a difference inthe manner : the form of the muscle does not admit ofits forming a vacuum, but it has a beautiful provision ofits own ; it has the power of throwing out a cluster ofsilky filaments, which fix themselves to the rock, andby which it hangs securely.
  20. 20. GALLS. MARY.HERE one of those curious mossy tufts on this rose* isbranch which I have often thought of asking you about.They are very pretty, but yet one only sees them occa-sionally, therefore, I suppose, they are not a usual pro-duction of the rose-tree. Perhaps you can tell mesomething of them. AUNT. I am not surprised at your feeling curious respectingthese singular excrescences, and you will be astonished,I think, when I tell you what purpose they serve. Theyare the habitations of insects. MARY. The habitations of insects ! you really do surprise me.But how can that be, for I can see no opening ; not one
  21. 21. 10 GALLS.sufficient even for a very tiny insect to have entered by,and I should imagine, from the size of the tuft, that itsoccupant is not so diminutive, unless its house be verymuch too large for it. AUNT. Your wonder is very natural, for it has perplexed manywiser persons to account for the bodies called galls, andwhich originate from the same cause as the moss-likeappearance we are speaking of. The ancient philoso-phers, finding on opening these substances that theycontained grubs, conceived justly that these proceededfrom eggs, but they were embarrassed by the same cir-cumstance that perplexes you. They were at a loss toaccount for the conveyance of these eggs into themiddle of a substance in which they could find noexternal orifice. They imagined that they were theeggs of insects deposited in the earth which had beendrawn up by the roots of trees along with the sap, andafterpassing through different vessels had stopped, somein the leaves, others in the branches, and had therehatched and produced the excrescences. Modern phi-losophers, more close and accurate observers of nature,
  22. 22. GALLS. 11have accounted for their formation in a more rationalway. They find that they are the habitations of thegrubs of the genus cynips, (Gall-fly.) I cannot betterdescribe to you the mode of their formation than byusing the words of an elegant writer and distinguished "naturalist, who observes, They cannot with proprietybe said to be constructed by the mother-insect but she ;is provided with an instrument as potent as an enchanterswand, which has but to pierce the site of the foundation,and commodious apartments, as if by magic, spring upand surround the eggs of her future descendants."Have you not frequently observed the red, spongy-looking substances on the leaves of the oak ? MARY. You mean oak-apples. AUNT. So they are commonly called, but more properlygalls.There is a great variety of galls on differentplants. All owe their origin to the deposition of an eggin the substance out of which they grow. The parentinsect is furnished with a curious sting, with which she
  23. 23. 12 GALLS.makes a puncture, and then introduces her egg, and ina few hours it becomes surrounded by the fleshy cover-ing we see. All these bodies are generally more acidthan the rest of the plant that bears them, and they arealso greatly inclined to turn red. MARY. Pray, are they of any use to the young insect r Isuppose, of course, they must be. AUNT. The careful mother has provided not only for theshelter and defence of her offspring, but also for itsnourishment, the little enclosed creature feeding uponthe interior, and there undergoing its changes to the flystate. MARY. But still it seems me very extraordinary that the tomere piercing of a leaf by the sting of an insect shouldproduce galls. AUNT. How these protuberances are produced we do not
  24. 24. GALLS. 13comprehend, and it seems very wonderful even if, as issupposed, the egg is accompanied by a peculiar fluid,that it should cause their growth around it. It is ascer-tained that the gall, which, however large, attainsits full a day or two, is caused by the egg size inor some accompanying fluid, not by the grub, whichdoes not appear until the gall is fully formed. Nowthat I have made you acquainted, as far as I can, withthe mode of production of these singular vegetable ex-crescences, I must not drop the subject till I have spokenof the important use to which those formed by one speciesof cynips (called by some authors the scriptorum) areapplied. We are indebted to this little insect for thatuseful agent, ink, which is made from the galls it pro-duces. These galls found on a species of oak are(quercus infectorid) very common in Asia Minor. Theyare collected and exported from Smyrna, Aleppo, andother ports in the Levant. MARY. How extraordinary are both their formation and theuse to which they are applied We owe a great deal to !the insects that produce them, and whenever I find
  25. 25. 14 GALLS.any gaDs on oak-leaves I shall open them, that Imay make acquaintance with the useful little creatures.I should like to be so fortunate as to meet with onewhen it had changed to its perfect state, and was aboutto leave its house. But is ink composed entirely of aliquid from these substances ? AUNT. Not entirely, though in a great measure. It is aninfusion of galls, copperas, and gum-arabic, I believe ;but unless the quantity of the extract from the gallsgreatly preponderates, the ink is not of a good colour,nor, I think I have heard, is it durable. Galls have yetanother important application, though not one whichcontributes to our pleasure so much as ink they are :one of OUT dying materials most in use, being con-stantly employed in dying black. There is anotherexcrescence of this nature, also, much esteemed in theLevant. This is formed on some species of salvia,(sage.) In consequence of the attacks of a cynips theyoung shoots swell into large, juicy balls, very likeapples, and even crowned with imperfectly formedleaves, resembling the calyx of that fruit. They are
  26. 26. GALLS. 15eaten prepared with sugar, and have an aromatic, acidflavour, which is very refreshing and agreeable. MARY. But you have not told me whether the tufts on rose-trees are also of use. Are they caused by a similarinsect ? AUNT. Yes : it takes its specific name from resorting tothe rose for depositing eggs cynips rosa. Its mossyballs used to be considered to possess medicinal pro-perties, and were sold under the name of bedeguar, butmodern practitioners attribute no efficacy to them.
  27. 27. 16 SNAILS. MARY. How many snails there are crawling about this morning.I suppose the rain of the night set them in motion, forI have always remarked one sees a much greater numberafter wet. Can you tell me what becomes of themduring winter ? I have often wished to know. AUNT. They hibernate.
  28. 28. Page 16.
  29. 29. SNAILS. 17 MARY. Pray what does that mean ? I do not think I remem-ber to have heard the term before. AUNT. I am glad I used it, then, for understanding a newword is an addition to ones stock of knowledge, and I amalways happy to be the means of increasing your infor-mation on any subject. The verb to hibernate isderived from hybernacula, (winter- quarters,) and soapplied to those animals which remain in a state oftorpidity during the cold season. The manner in whichsnails defend themselves from cold is very curious. Anumber associate together, (generally about the begin-ning of October, or as soon as it becomes chilly,) in thebanks of ditches, or in thickets or hedges. They ceaseto eat, and conceal themselves under fallen leaves ormoss. Each then forms for itself a hole large enoughto contain its shell,expands the collar of the mantle overthe edge of the shell, and then inspires a quantity of air.The mantle soon secretes a large portion of very whitefluid over its whole surface, which sets like plaster-of-Paris, thus forming a solid covering. When this lid is
  30. 30. 18 SNAILS.hardened, the animal retires, expels a portion of air fromits lungs, and forms another partition of the same fluid ;and continuing this operation several times, it sometimesforms rive or six divisions, with the intermediate spacesor cells filled with About three days suffice for the air.protection of each individual. I knew that they hidthemselves during the winter, but I was not myselfaware of the curious circumstances connected with theirconcealment, till I met with an account of them in awork on natural history a short time ago. It is highlyinteresting to consider what a beautiful economy of itsown every creature has. How many curious operationsare continually going on around us, without our beingaware of them till they are pointed out by closer andbetter informed observers of nature than ourselves. Then,indeed, they cannot fail to fill us with delight and admi-ration, and incite us to more diligent pursuit in a studywhich offers so much that is new and engaging. MARY. And pray how long do snails continue torpid ? AUNT. They generally remain enclosed for six months in
  31. 31. SNAILS. 19their self-formed prisons, and do not reappear till thespring. It appears, from the chemical analyses to whichthe lids (or opercula, as they are called) have been sub-mitted, that they consist wholly of a substance calledcarbonate of lime. The animal obtains this calcareousfluid, not merely from its ordinary vegetable food, butfrom the earth, which it eats in great abundance. Thiscircumstance accounts for some species thriving betterin chalky districts. These animals eat nothing duringthe period of hibernation, and experiments have provedthat they exist without motion, nutrition, or respiration ;in short, that they are deprived of all their usual func-tions. In our climate, it is generally about the begin-ning of April that they leave their torpid state. Themode in which they make their way from their prison isnot only curious, but beautiful. The air which had been is again inspired, and each division forcedexpired, awayby the pressure of the enclosed animal, till it reaches thelid, which being harder, requires a greater effort toburst through.Having effected this, the animal comesforth,and immediately begins feeding with appetite.Experiments show, that the return of warmth is notalone sufficient to restore their animation; moisture is c 2
  32. 32. 20 SNAILS.also requisite. They feel, very sensibly, either extremesof heat or cold, for they frequently retire within theirshells during the height of summer, where they remaina day and night, tilla shower brings them out again.The effect of temperature on this class of animals hasbeen tried, by shutting up a few snails in a perforatedbox, and some others in a bottle, tightly corked, so as toexclude all communication with the air in neither situ- :ation were they supplied with either food or water.Those deprived of air did not live long, but those hithe perforated box retired into their shells, (closing themas I have described,) and remained to all appearancedead. This death, however, was only apparent, for bybeing dropped into a glass containing water of the tem-perature of 70 or 72, they may be reanimated in aboutfour or fire hours. A large garden-snail will sometimessupport this severe confinement for several years, appa-rently dead all the time, but it will revive upon beingput into milk-warm water, quite uninjured. MARY. I have one more question to ask you. Are the darkpoints at the ends of snails horns their eyes ?
  33. 33. SNAILS. 21 AUNT. That is a subject which has given rise to much dis-cussion among naturalists, and which seems still unde-termined ; but I believe the opinion of those who havedevoted most attention to it is, that these organs arenot organs of sight, but of feeling, answering a similarpurpose to the antenna of insects. These creatures,which rank so low in the scale of organized beings, giverise to much consideration. Their manner of moving isa matter of doubt, too. They are perfectly smooth, andthere are no appendages to do the office of feet. It is,therefore, imagined, that they are propelled forward bya discharge of slime, which is emitted from every part ofthe under surface. Dry air is observed to deprive themof the power of motion, which seems to give probabilityto this conjecture. MARY. They certainly seem never to move without a dischargeof slime, for one may always trace the way they havetaken by the shining path they have left behind. I sawa particularly large snail-shell in your cabinet the othermorning, about which I have always forgotten to ask you.
  34. 34. 22 SNAILS. AUNT. It is the helix pomatia, (edible snail,) said to be bene- ficial in consumptive cases.The specimen you remarked among my shells I prize, not for its beauty, but because I found it in Normandy , in the fosse of the Chateau dAr- ques, and it serves as amemento of a pleasant day passed among the remainsof that ancient pile. MARY. The Chateau dArques ! I did not know you hadever visited it. Will you tell me something of it ? AUNT. a fine specimen of a Norman fortress, erected, as It isis generally the case, on a lofty mound of earth, sur-rounded by a deep ditch, or moat. In this instance, themound being raised on a considerable eminence, ren-
  35. 35. CHATEAU DARQUES. Page 22.
  36. 36. SNAILS. 23ders the situation of this venerable ruin extremely im-posing. It is in the centre of a lovely valley, throughwhich winds a little stream that looks like asilver threadwhen its course is viewed from the heights. It is a de-lightful scene, one on which I dwell with peculiar plea-sure, perhaps, because I beheld it the first day I spentin France. To me, the gay costume of the female pea-sants, engaged in the labours of the harvest, added agreat charm, by marking the landscape as foreign. Imight have fancied myself still in the country I had solately left but the Canchoises, with their high white ;caps and showy Rouen handkerchiefs, as they continu-ally passed beforemy eye in all the activity of theirbusy occupation, did not for a moment allow me to for-get that I was not standing on English ground. Muchwas I amused by the expressions of a ragged little boy,who acted as our cicerone, and exclaimed, with all theanimation of his country, "Mais Monsieur, Madame "voyez la campagne, quelle est superbe ! Among the historical recollections which the castlesuggests, perhaps the most interesting is its gallant de-fence in 1589, by that hero of French story, Henry IV., against the army of the League, commanded by the Due
  37. 37. 24 SNAILS. de Mayenne. The result of this battle may be consi-dered as having been highly conducive to Henrysfuture success, for he had been reduced to such extre-mity before the walls of the adjacent town of Dieppe,that he had been on the point of relinquishing his enter-prise, and retiring into England, but was advised byBiron to make good his post at Arques. The issueproved the wisdom of the Marechals counsel. So des-perate was Henrys condition before the engagement,that he said of himself, he was " a king without a king-dom, a husband without a wife, and a warrior withoutmoney." The inequality of numbers was fearful the Duke ;de Mayenne had an army of 31,000 men, while that ofHenry only amounted to 3,000, part of which consistedofGerman and Swiss auxiliaries. But Henrys was oneof those master spirits, which elastic ally rise from thepressure of adversity. Far from being dismayed by un-favourable appearances, he immediately applied himselftomaking the most of his resources, by posting his littleband to the best advantage, and exerting all his energies ;he allowed himself no rest either by day or night.Sully describes him, at the moment of the enemys ap-proach, as acting and speaking with the greatest com-
  38. 38. SNAILS. 25posure, and not betraying, either by his countenance ormanner, the slightest perturbation ; and he mentions anoble reply he made at this juncture to a person ofrank, who expressed surprise to see his scanty numberof followers. You see not all," said Henry, " for you "reckon not God and my just cause, which assist me."For some time the League seemed to prevail. Thougheach station was long valorously defended by thedevoted adherents of the king, their ruin appeared in-evitable, from the superiority of numbers on the otherside, when the clearing off of a thick fog enabled thecannon to act, and by the volley discharged from thecastle, the fortune of the day was decided in Henrysfavour. Sixtus V. predicted Henrys success from his " He wasgreat activity, for he said, not longer in bed,than the Due de Mayenne was at table." MARY. Thus a poor sluggish snail has led us into the tumultof the battle of Arques ! I thank you very much for theaccount of it !
  39. 39. THE CAMEL. MARY. HAVE been thinking a great deal of the account of the camel we met with in the travels we are read- ing. How admirably their soft feet, and their power of abstaining from water, adapt them to the scorched and sandy de- serts through which they travel with their Arab masters ! AUNT. I am glad, my dear, that this subject has engagedyour attention, and that you have reflected so much
  40. 40. THE GIRAFFE. Page 27.
  41. 41. THE CAMEL. 27upon it. This useful creature is, indeed, a striking in-stance of the goodness and wisdom of God, who hasprepared all created beings for the circumstances underwhich they are to be placed. And you will be convincedof this pervading principle, the more minutely you exa-mine His beautiful works. There is another animal, aninhabitant of the same region as the camel ; but as itshabits differ, so do its provisions. I mean the giraffe,or camel-leopard. It is not furnished with the recep-tacle for water, because it feeds on succulent plants, andthereforethis would be unnecessary; nor has it thepadded hoof of the camel, because it does not confineitself to sand, but delights in rocky heights. To enableit to climb these without stumbling, it is provided with twotoes, defended with a horny covering, and as its tongueis very much exposed to the sun while collecting food,this organ is protected by a coating, which prevents itsbeing blistered by the heat. Though it will be digress-ing, I cannot help mentioning a singular fact with respectto the Arabian camel, (that with one hump,) lest Ishould forget to callyour attention to it at some futuretime. It is, that this camel is never found wild the ;whole race is in a state of subjection to man.
  42. 42. 28 THE CAMEL. MARY. That is, indeed, very extraordinary ! How can it beaccounted for ? AUNT. In order to discover the most probable reason, wemust go back as far as the history of the deluge. Weknow that all the animals of the antediluvian earthperished, except the two of each species, which werekept alive to continue their kind. Now, it is supposed,that when Noah and his family quitted the ark, theycarefully preserved these useful animals and their pro-geny, on account of the great services they derived fromthem, while they allowed the descendants of the otheranimals to roam abroad, and return to a state of nature.We may easily believe that the same consideration insucceeding generations of men has produced the sameresult, and that thus the Arabian camel has never reco-vered its liberty. But to return to our immediate sub-ject. We need not go to another quarter of the globeforexamples of this wise adaptation, we are surroundedby them, and to the observer of nature they are obvious,not only in animal, but in vegetable life. We find plants
  43. 43. THE CAMEL. 29which require little moisture, placed in dry situations ;and again, those to whose sustenance moisture is requi-site, we find growing in damp watery places. MARY. Yes, you know how much trouble I took with some I never could get anyplants I found in the bog, buttaken from it to live in the garden, till, as you advised, Ibrought a quantity of the earth in which they were awaygrowing. AUNT. The of the garden was not suited to them, and soilbesides, there is a chemical difference between earths,which causes plants to flourish better in those in whichthey are placed than in those to which we remove them,evidently proving that they are put in the soil bestadapted to their peculiar habits. Again, remark the pro-vision made for climbing-plants. Their stems are tooweak to sustain the weight of their leaves and flowers,but they do not sink under a load so disproportioned totheir slender structure. They are furnished with deli-cate threads, or fibres, called tendrils, which spring
  44. 44. 30 THE CAMEL.from their stem and branches, and twine themselvesround the neighbouring plants of firmer growth. Bythis means this elegant tribe of plants gain support fromtheir stronger neighbours. We do not see tendrils pro-ceeding from the branches of trees or shrubs which canstand erect without depending on others, which provesthat there is design in their appearing in those plants towhich they are so useful and essential. Rising a degreehigher in the scale of creation, let us consider the insectworld, the adaption of their powers and organs to thesituations in which they are placed, and the functionsthey have to perform. Do not the wings of our gaysummer visitors, moths and butterflies, so broad andlarge in comparison to their small bodies, show for whatelement they are intended ? How admirably are theysuited for bearing them along in their rapid flight, andhow much more easily does their being able to flyenable them to collect their food, which is honey, ob-tained from the nectaries of flowers. In the caterpillarstate they feed on the leaves of plants ; when arrived atthe last stage of their existence, the little nourishmentthey require is taken from the blossoms, and as theseare generally on the summits of plants, the winged
  45. 45. THE CAMEL. 31insects mode of travelling gives it great command overthem ; could it only crawl, it would be long in reachingthe object of its pursuit. Some insects are providedwith a covering, or case, for their wings, as the beetletribe. MARY. I suppose, because their wings are so much moredelicate and thin in texture than those of moths andbutterflies. AUNT. That, probably, may be one reason, but there are,also, others. They undergo the last change underground, (in some instances at a considerable depthbelow the surface,) and, therefore, elytra, or wing-cases,are extremely serviceable in protecting their fragile in-closures during the progress of the insect to its newelement. And you must have observed that beetles arenot, like our sportive butterflies, always on the wing ;their time of flight does not begin till the evening, andtheir strong, hard coverings prevent their being injuredas they crawl on the ground, for if you inadvertently
  46. 46. 32 THE CAMEL.tread on a beetle,you may see it as you pass on runningbriskly away, unhurt by a pressure which would havedestroyed so small a creature had it not been providedwith so good a defence. MARY. Before we go in will you tell me the peculiarity inthat chrysalis which you had not time to explain whenyou showed it me the other day. AUNT. I am glad you have recollected it, for its peculiarityis a remarkable instance of what I have been endea-vouring to impress on your mind to-day. It was thechrysalis of the great goat-moth, (bombyx cossus.) Thecaterpillar, when about to change, bores into livingtrees, and penetrates so far into the willow, (the tree itusually selects,) that if there were not some provisionfor its making its way out it would be a completeprisoner. But guarded against, and if this difficulty isyou will run and fetch the pupa I will show you how.Observe that the head is armed with points; theseenable it to pierce its cocoon. Observe further, that
  47. 47. THE CAMEL. 33 each joint or division of the pupa is beset with sharp, strong teeth, all turning one way, towards the head. These teeth are employed wood, and to lay hold of the when thus fastened it pushesitself a little further, at last, by repeated efforts, tillit arrives at the hole in the tree which it had madewhen a caterpillar, through which it emerges, andbecomes an inhabitant of the air. It is not usualfor pupae to be toothed in this manner; we do notfind it the case with those which attach themselves ;but if you were sawn across, and to find to see a willowa chrysalis in the middle of the wood, you would con-sider how it would be possible for the insect to liberateitself. The intention of the teeth as an assistance inthisprocess evident. is I hope I have made you under-stand the manner in which they are used. MARY. Yes, I think I do perfectly. I fancy the chrysalisemploying its teeth as that boy who is climbing up the
  48. 48. 34 THE CAMEL.tree before us does his hand holding by a projectiontill he draws his feet a little nearer the point, and thenagain extending his hand to seek for another place tohold by. AUNT. Well, I think your illustration shows that you have acorrect notion of the chrysaliss movements in its darkabode.
  49. 49. 35 THE SUNFLOWER. MARY.You have lately made me acquainted in our walks witha great many useful plants, and I cannot help thinkingwhat a pity it is that large, handsome sunflower cannotbe applied to some purpose. It certainly makes a greatdisplay in a garden, but it grows to such a size that itseems as if it ought to have some use beyond this. AUNT. And so it has. You know I have often told you, andI again repeat, that we should not conclude that any-thing is useless till we have made ourselves acquaintedwith its properties we shall then find that most of the ;productions of nature, beyond the gratification theyafford us by their beautiful forms and tints, may be em-ployed by the farmer, the manufacturer, or the chemist. Recollect that brilliant flower we examined the other D 2
  50. 50. 36 THE SUNFLOWER.day, the saintfoin, did you not know that the fields wesee sown of it were intended for the food of cattle, youwould, perhaps, have imagined that it was designed onlyto delight the eye. Nor would you have supposed thatpretty little plant, with its delicately pencilled petals,the flax, could be manufactured into such a texture aslinen, nor that the mignionette, when prepared by thechemist, would prove so serviceable from the dye ityields. And how many of our gay flowers possessmedicinal virtues, as the handsome fox-glove, the mea-dow-saffron, and many others which I will not now stopto enumerate.. Now the sunflower does not possesssuch striking and important properties as the plants Ihave named, yet it has uses which are not generallyknown, though it is so frequently cultivated as an orna-ment to the garden. The seed forms an excellent andconvenient food for poultry, and it is only necessary tocut off the thickly studded receptacles and tie them upin a dry situation. These seeds are said not only tofatten poultry, but greatly to increase the number ofeggs they lay. When cultivated to a considerable ex-tent, they are, also, good food for sheep, pigs,and phea-sants. The leaves, too, when dried, have their peculiar
  51. 51. THE SUNFLOWER. 37use they make a good powder for cattle. The dry stalks ;burn well, and yield an abundance of alkali, and youhave yourself remarked how busy our little friends thebees are, loading themselves from its blossoms, whichare particularly attractive to them, and must supply agreat deal of matter for the composition of their winterstores. MARY. Well, I have, indeed, done the sunflower injustice, forinstead of being of no value, it seems to have a greatmany uses, but one of them I do not understand. Yousaid the stalks produced alkali : pray what is alkali ? AUNT. To answer your inquiry I must enter into a little che-mical explanation, which I did not recollect the sun-flower would lead me into. MARY. Oh ! 1 am very glad of that, if you will not be tired of have always found our conversationsexplaining, for Iso amusing when you have referred to chemistry inthem.
  52. 52. 38 THE SUNFLOWER. AUNT. I am happy you have, for it is a subject on which, ata future time, I shall wish you to have much fullerknowledge than the slight allusions to it which I haveoccasionally made can give you. Alkalies are bodieswhich have an acrid, burning taste, a pungent smell,and a caustic effect on the skin and flesh ; another oftheir general properties is, that they turn blue vegetableinfusions green. There are three, but having given youthis general idea of their nature, I will now only speakof potash, the one which is left after the burning of theleaves and stalks of the sunflower. It forms a part inthe composition of many vegetables, but some containit in greater quantities than others. As the ashes of aburnt vegetable contain other substances besides pot-ash, it is not easy to obtain the potash from them in apure state. Indeed, it is only by a process much morecomplicated than combustion that it can be obtainedpure. But still the ashes are valuable for the alkalithey contain, and are used for some purposes withoutfm-ther preparation. A little purified, they make whatis called pearlash, which, mixed with oil or fat, makes awell-known and generally useful compound soap. A
  53. 53. THE SUNFLOWER. 39very remarkable property of potash is the formation ofglass by its fusion with silicious earth, the substance ofwhich sand and flint are chiefly composed. This,though infusible alone, when mixed with potash meltsby the heat of a furnace, and runs into glass. MARY. Then when I look at the window, I perhaps see whathas formed part of a sunflower. This is, indeed, sin-gular. Well, the sunflower has been of use to me, forit has taught me what and of what soap and alkalies are,glass are composed, neither of which I knew before.
  54. 54. 40 CHARCOAL. AUNT.GOOD morning, my dear. You need not have preparedfor walking, for it has just begun to rain, therefore wemust remain within. MARY. Oh, but I hope, though we cannot go out, you will notreturn, because if you have nothing particular to do youwill perhaps fulfil the promise you made me last week :you said you would tell me how charcoal was pre-pared. AUNT. Very true, and we cannot have a better opportunitythan the present. In the first place, then, I supposeyou know the substance from which it is obtained.
  55. 55. CHARCOAL. 41 MARY. No, indeed I do not ; but what I have seen lookedalmost like logs of wood. AUNT. It is commonly said that charcoal is made from wood,but this is not a correct way of speaking. In order fullyto make you understand the nature of charcoal, I mustdip a little into chemistry, MARY. What connexion can charcoal and chemistry have ? AUNT. Carbon is a very important chemical agent, and thisisnothing more than charcoal in its pure state, that is,unmixed with other ingredients it forms a great part of ;all organized bodies, and is particularly abundant invegetables. When the oil and water (the other compo-nent parts of vegetable matter) are evaporated, a black,brittlesubstance remains this is carbon, or charcoal.To obtain it in the purest state in which it has yet beenpossible, the vegetable matter is subjected to a more
  56. 56. 42 CHARCOAL.delicate operation than I am going to describe to you,as I shall confine myself to the common charcoal as itis prepared for culinary and other ordinary purposes.Logs of wood are closely piled, and covered with clay,in which holes are left to admit air, and a fire is lightedunder it.The holes in the clay are stopped up as soonas the wood has caught fire, that it may not be com-pletely burnt. Though the extinguished, suffi- fire iscient heat remains to deprive the wood of its oily andwatery particles, without reducing it to ashes. MARY. I have heard it is very unwholesome to be in a roomwith burning charcoal. Why is it so ? AUNT. The act of burning converts it into a gas, or vapour,which uniting with one of the principles of our atmo-sphere, (the oxygen,) forms a compound called carbonicacid gas, and this is irrespirable, and, therefore, thelungs do not obtain a supply of air, and you are awarethat any cause which deprives us of air must producedeath by suffocation.
  57. 57. CHARCOAL. 43 MARY. Then the fames of charcoal are this gas. AUNT. Yes and though so highly prejudicial in a room, or :any other close place into which there is no admissionof atmospheric air, yet, taken into the stomach, it is notonly harmless but beneficial. It is an ingredient inmany of the medicinal waters, in soda-water, for in-stance ; caused by the the effervescence of which iscarbonic acid, which, being lighter than the water inwhich it is condensed, flies off immediately the pressureof the cork is removed. MARY. 1 have seen beer and some wines effervesce as muchas soda-water, do they also contain carbonic acid ? AUNT. Yes, its escape causes the brisk, sparkling effect inall these liquors. MARY. It certainly does appear to me very extraordinary that
  58. 58. 44 CHARCOAL.what is so injurious to inhale should be wholesome todrink, and that the fumes of a charcoal fire and the fixedair from soda-water are of the same nature. AUNT. But there is another form under which carbon appearsin its solid state, which will, I suspect, surpriseyou morethan what I have already told you. That most brilliantof all gems, the diamond, is nothing more than carbonin a crystallized state. MARY. That does seem incredible ! How is it proved ? AUNT. By a process which discovers to us the analysis ;component parts of bodies by their decomposition.Thus, if we decompose a piece of carbon by combus-tion, we have told you, that carbonic acid is find, as Ithe product, and if a diamond be submitted to the sametrial the result is the same, which proves that their na-ture is similar.
  59. 59. CHARCOAL. 45 MARY. Surprising !that anything so black, heavy, and dull-looking should be composed of the same material as themost brilliant of all substances. AUNT. I could detain you much longer on the subject ofcarbon, for it enters into the composition of animals,vegetables, and minerals it is one of the ; componentsof all oils. But I must now take my leave.
  60. 60. 46 SPONGE. MARY.As was preparing to come out this morning, I was Iconsidering what sponge is, and wondered it had neveroccurred to me to ask you. I fancied it more like afungus than anything else I know : is it one ? AUNT. No ; but I am not surprised at your imagining that itis, for it certainly has very much the appearance ofsome kinds of fungus, and is attached to rocks in thesame manner that the fungus tribe are to wells, trees,&c. will you say when I tell you the various But whatspecies of sponge are either animals, or the habitationsof marine creatures. There have been various opinionswith regard to these curious productions. They wereformerly supposed to be vegetables, but their being ob-served to shrink when touched, soon led to an idea that
  61. 61. SPONGES. Page 46.
  62. 62. SPONGE. 47they possessed animal life. Then it was conjecturedthat each cell, or hole, contained a small worm but later ;observers not having (after the most accurate attentionand examination) ever been able to discover any wormin the cells, or to detect any coming out, have decidedthat the sponge is itself an animal, " whose mouths areso many holes, or ends of branched tubes opening onits surface, and that by these it receives its nourish-ment." MARY. You speakof various species of sponge. I was notaware that there was more than the one kind which is socommonly used. AUNT. That is, indeed, the most usual ; but 1 can show youengravings of several others of totally different form andappearance and in some cabinets of natural history ;there are a very great variety preserved. England alone,I think, affords ten sorts. MARY. Does England supply all we see used ?
  63. 63. 48 SPONGE. AUNT. On the contrary, I rather believe you will find that thatspecies (spongiaofficinalis) is notto be met withon the Englishcoast. At any rate,great quantitiesare imported. Itabounds on thecoast of AsiaMinor, and theislands of the Ar-chipelago. The inhabitants of many of these islandsgain a subsistence by diving for it to the low rocks inthe vicinity of their coasts. The water is extremelyclear, and the experienced divers are able to distinguishfrom the surface the points to which the animal is at-tached below, when an unpractised eye could scarcelydiscern the bottom. The divers go out in boats ; eachboat is furnished with a large stone fastened to a rope,which the diver seizes in his hand on plunging headforemost from the stern, in order to increase the velocity
  64. 64. SPONGE. 49of his descent through the water. By this means hesaves unnecessary expenditure of breath, and facilitates up by his companions when hehis ascent, being pulledcan no longer remain under water. They can rarelybear being below more than two minutes, and the pro-cess of detaching the sponge is, of course, very tedious ;three or four divers frequently descend in successionto secure a particularly fine specimen. In some of the islands there is a regulation, that noyoung man shall claim his bride till he can descend with depth of twenty fathoms ; and in afacility to the littleisland named Himia, a girl is not permitted by her rela-tions tomarry before she has brought up a certainquantity of sponges, and can give proof of her agility,by taking them from a certain depth, MARY. It must be very difficult, and require practice ! Ishould not like to be put to such a trial. AUNT. It would certainly be a severe one to a person un-practised in the art of diving. But I cannot dismiss this E
  65. 65. 50 SPONGE.subject without reverting to the important office per-formed by some tribes of marine insects or worms theformation of islands. MARY. The formation of islands ! You cannot be in earnest,my dear aunt. AUNT. I assure you, my dear niece, I never was more so. MARY. Then, pray explain to me how this can be accom-plished, for I can scarcely believe it possible. They mustbe enormous insects. AUNT. No, they are not but by the extent of their works ;we see what may be effected through the agency of verysmall creatures, when labouring diligently and in concert ;and from them you may learn a useful lesson, never torelax in industry, but to remember that continued appli-cation and perseverance will conquer difficulties, which
  66. 66. MADREPORE. Page 51.
  67. 67. SPONGE. 51at firstappear insurmountable. The active little ani-mals to which I allude are the worms that form thevarious species of coral. MARY. I saw some coral in Mr. B.s cabinet the other day.Is the coral of which these islands are formed similar tothat? AUNT. Yes, and you recollect you particularly admired a large white speci- men resembling a cauliflower, which I toldyou was called a madrepore, and was the work of one of the species of coral worms. Now it is principally of this that the islands I am about to de-scribe are composed. It is most common in the tropical E 2
  68. 68. 52 SPONGE.seas, and a mass of it (frequently so large as to endangerthe safety of vessels) is called a reef. As it is requisite forthe worms to be covered with water while they work,these reefs are renderedmore dangerous by not appear-ing above the surface. It was formerly imagined thatthey raised these immense structures from the bottom ofthe sea, but now the general opinion is, that submarinehills and mountains are the foundations on which theyraise them. The tiny architects work till they reach the beyond this point they cannotlevel of the highest tide,advance: those which began their operations lower,continue them till they reach the same height, and asthey work very rapidly, you may imagine what an exten-sive surface is thus produced. The navigation of thePacific Ocean requires the greatest caution, on accountof the number of reefs that now exist, and the new onesthat are constantly in progress. By day there is littledanger, because when these vast edifices are not suffi-ciently lofty to be seen above water, there is a ripplingover them, which marks the spot. I can scarcely ima-gine any object more splendidly beautiful than one ofthese reefs : the description navigators give of them isso enchanting, that one is quite inspired with a desire to
  69. 69. SPONGE* 53witness the scene they depict. Over many of them thewater is so clear that their whole structure, and everythingon them, is disclosed to view, the treasures of the mightydeep are discovered. Mixed with the beautiful coral itselfare sea-weeds and sponges of all forms and colours, andshells equally varied ; fishes of all sizes and tints, andenormous sea-snakes, increasing the splendour of theirlustrous skins by their undulating motions. In short, itisa new world of beauty rendered dazzlingly brilliantby the sparkling medium through which it is viewed.
  70. 70. 54 SPONGE.But I must not allow the beauty of the reefs to draw mefrom the mode of their conversion into islands. Eachsuccessive colony of worms dies when their work iscompleted, and they are no longer washed by the water,and the interstices in their protruded abodes are, by degrees, filled with sand, shells, and other sub- stances, each tide adding some con- tribution, till at length an island is formed. The sea conveys the seeds of marineplants, and those of the trees of adjacent lands. Thebirds, too, which are its first visitors, bring seeds, andby other means prepare it for the occupation ofman. MARY. Then, I suppose, the birds are like the worms, verynumerous.
  71. 71. SPONGE. 55 AUNT. So much so, that if we had not the testimony of eye-witnesses,whose veracity is to be depended upon, theaccounts of their numbers would scarcely seem credible.Captain Flinders, a bold navigator of the Australianseas, (and who, by the bye, suffered shipwreck on acoral reef,) mentions a flight of petrels, which took anhour and a half in their passage over his vessel. Hedescribes them as forming a solid, compact mass, whichhe calculated at fifty yards deep, and three hundredbroad, and computing the space that each bird wouldoccupy in flying, he considered the whole number toamount to 151,500,000,and the quantity of ground theywould require to burrow in, to eighteen and a half squaremiles. This will give you some idea of the importanceof the winged preparers of the coral islands. MARY. What kind of birds are petrels ? AUNT. They are a tribe which frequent the sea-coast, and
  72. 72. 56 SPONGE*there form burrows for themselves, or, as in some in-stances on our shores, take possession of those of rabbits.During the day they are generally on the wing, seekingfor food ; this consists of the fat of whales or fish. Butthe most distinguishing characteristic of the genus is,that all the species have the power of spouting oil fromtheir bills to a considerable distance. This is a meansof defence ; they spirt it in the faces of those who at-tempt to take them. From the nature of their food,they abound so much in oil, that they actually, in somecountries, have wicks passed through them, and areused for candles. Does not forcibly impress us with the wonderful itpower of the Creator, when we consider the feeble in-struments he employs for such great and curious works ?We see visible traces of his mighty hand on every regionof his dominions ; the same beautiful adaptation to cir-cumstances, the same wisdom is evident, whether wecontemplate the starry firmament, the air, the earth, orthe ocean, all teem with His works, all declare Hisglory. exclaim with the Psalmist, " O Lord how We !manifold are thy works ; in wisdom hast thou madethem all : the earth is full of thy riches. So is the great
  73. 73. SPONGE. 57and wide sea also ; wherein are things, creeping thingsinnumerable, both small and great beasts."
  74. 74. 58RUST INDIAN-RUBBER LEAD PENCILS, &c. MARY.You have so frequently told me that I ought not to letcommon objects pass without learning all I can aboutthem, that I have kept a of some I wish to ask you listabout, and perhaps you will be so good as to give mesome information respecting two or three of them to-day, AUNT. I shall be very happy to do so. Let me hear whatquestions you have to propose. MARY. In the first place I want to know what causes steel torust in a damp place ? AUNT. The decomposition of water.
  75. 75. RUST ON STEEL. 59 MARY. do not understand your answer, for how can I reallythat be the reason of this rust on my penknife, whichhas not been near water? AUNT. But it has been in a damp room, and damp is waterin a state of vapour. I did not expect you to under-stand my answer without further explanation, which 1was going to give you. The components of water aretwo gases, oxygen and hydrogen; and the oxygenhaving a greater affinity for steel than for hydrogen, theformer obtains it from the and the brown coating latter,is formed, which is commonly called rust, but moreproperly an oxyd, from oxydation, a term used to ex-press the union of bodies with oxygen. MARY. Is not oxygen the gas you told me we inhale fromthe atmosphere when we breathe ? AUNT. Yes, and I also told you that it is absolutely requisite
  76. 76. 60 RUST ON STEEL,in combustion. This operation cannot go on without asupply of oxygen, and in fact oxydation is a slight com-bustion, for there is disengagement of light and heat,(the accompaniments of combustion,) though it is notsufficient to be perceptible when metals oxydate at thecommon temperature of the atmosphere. The attractionof metals for oxygen varies considerably ; some requireto be heated to combine with it. The precious metals,gold, silver, and platina, preserve their lustre so well,because they will not oxydate without being exposed tothe greatest heat the chemist can produce. There isone, manganese, which has so strong an affinity foroxygen, that itbecomes an oxyd immediately on its ex-posure to the air, and is seldom found in its purestate. The oxyds of metals may be restored totheir pure metallic state by a process which is calledreviving. For this purpose they are placed in con-tact with charcoal heated red hot, because it has a oxygen than metals. The oxygengreater attraction forquits the metal, and combines with the charcoal.Thus the oxyd is decomposed, or unburnt, and the metalrestored.
  77. 77. INDIAN-RUBBER. 61 MARY. Then rust is an oxyd, formed by the union of ametal with oxygen. Now you will, perhaps, think mynext question a very ignorant one, but I do not recollectever having heard what Indian-rubber is ; or, if I have, Ihave forgotten. AUNT. You probably never have. Of what nature should youimagine it to be ? MARY. It seems like a gum. AUNT. You are right, it is something of that nature, but par-takes more of the properties of a and its proper resin,name is caoutchouc. It is procured from two or threespecies of trees in the East Indies and South America,from which it flows as a white milky fluid. MARY. But we generally see it in the shape of bottles ; Isuppose it is made to assume that form by art.
  78. 78. 6*2 INDIAN-RUBBER. AUNT. Yes ; incisions are made in the trees, and the juice collected, into which little moulds of clay are dipped, and when dry, dipped in again; and this is conti- nued till the coating has acquired sufficient consistency ; the enclosed clay is then broken, aud shaken out. MARY. for the brown earthy appearance one That accounts always sees on cutting a bottle of Indian-rubber. But you said the juice was white ; is it then coloured, because we always have it black. AUNT. In a liquid state it is white, but it blackens in drying. You frequently see lines and figures on it; these are traced on the last coating before it is quite dry. It is obtained chiefly during rain, being observed to ooze more freely at that time. It is insoluble in water, of which property the Indians avail themselves by making boats of it, which are not penetrable by water. DO It may used as flambeaux, and is said to give a beautifully rilliant light,J^ori and not to emit any unpleasant odour.
  79. 79. OF LEAD IN PENCILS. 63It is very difficult of solution, for it resists the power ofall common solvents, and can only, I believe, be per-fectly dissolved in ether. MARY. subject of Indian-rubber reminds me of another Thequestion I have often thought of asking you. How is thelead in pencils made so much more shining and bril-liantthan lead generally is ? AUNT. You are not aware that you are speaking of two dif-ferent things ; of a mineral, not a metal. There is notany lead in the composition of your pencils, though fromcustom they are called black-lead pencils. MARY. Then, pray, dear aunt, do tell me of what they arecomposed. AUNT. Of carbon, (a substance you are already somewhacquainted with,) united with a small portion of iron ;
  80. 80. 64 OF LEAD IN PENCILS.these together form a compound, called in the languageof chemistry, carburet of iron. There is only one mineof it in England. MARY. And where is that ? AUNT. In Cumberland. MARY. From what you say, I suppose there is much morecarbon than iron in this compound. AUNT. Yes, the carbon greatly predominates indeed, it is;considered to approach as nearly as possible to the bestprepared charcoal, for there are only five parts of iron,and no other ingredient. MARY. From what kind of tree is gum arable obtained ?
  81. 81. GUMS AND RESINS. 65 AUNT. It is of the same genus as that beautiful shrub withits tufts of brilliant yellow flowers we were admiring theother day, and which you had been accustomed to calla mimosa, till I told you it was now classed as an acacia.The species in question grows in great abundance inAfrica generally, but the gum is chiefly obtained fromthose trees situated in the equatorial regions. Arabia,Barbary, and Egypt supply us with the greatest quan-tity. It exudes in the same manner as that from ourcherry and plum-trees. Now remark the distinctionbetween a gum and a resin. Indian-rubber (which Ihave just told you is of the latter nature) is insoluble inwater, and this is the general characteristic of resins,though they yield more easily to spirituous solventsthan caoutchouc. Gums, on the contrary, are solublein water. By recollecting this fact you will be possessedof a test by which you can yourself discover to which ofthese classes any particular body belongs. In appear-ance, there is a great resemblance between gums andresins, and therefore they may be easily mistaken till submitted to the proof of solubility in water. In Arabia gum-arabic is applied to a purpose we are not accus- F
  82. 82. ()6 GUM-ARABIC.tomed to see it used for in England, for sealing letters,and little vases filled with it, in a liquid state, are hungoutside the houses. Even such trifling differences ofcustom in foreign countries strike us as singular andcurious,and arrest our attention. Travellers in theEast remark, that the style of folding, directing, andsealing letters immediately indicates, to a person ac-quainted with the customs of Arabia, Syria, and Turkey,whence they come, for each country has its distinctmode. MARY. So that if I ever should receive a letter sealed withgum, I shall suspect it has travelled to me from Arabia,though I do not think it likely I shall ever have mydiscernment exercised on this point.
  83. 83. COLOURS. AUNT.As saw you drawing yesterday, it occurred to me that Iyou had very probably never considered whence yourcolours were obtained. Am I right ? Have you everinquired from what substances they were extracted ? MARY. Your conjecture is indeed correct, for this is a sub-ject that I have never thought on, and I am quite gladthat you have directed my attention to it. Let me seeI should imagine the colours were all made from vege-tables. Is this the case ? AUNT. Far from it. Some are obtained from vegetables,some from animals, but the greater number fromminerals. F -2
  84. 84. 68 COLOURS. MARY. So instead of the artist being indebted to one only ofthe kingdoms of nature, as I ignorantly supposed, he issupplied from the three. Will you tell me the coloursthat belong to each ? AUNT. I will enumerate a few of each class; but I shallmerely speak of the nature and origin of the colours,without attempting to explain how they are rendered fitfor the painters usea process which, in some instances, ;is very complicated. You may take it as a general rulewith respect to water-colours, that those prepared frommetals are always opaque, and those from animals andvegetables transparent. Prussian-blue, which is ametallic colour, is an exception, being always transpa-rent. Now comply with your request, and tell you I willthat carmine and lake are obtained from the cochinealinsect, seppiafrom a species of cuttle-fish. Ivory-blackisthe soot (or fixed product of combustion) of ivory orbones burnt in a close vessel.
  85. 85. COLOURS. 69 MARY. Then these may be called animal colours. AUNT. Certainly. The mineral and metallic colours arevery numerous indeed, nearly ; all the metallic oxyds areused as paints. Ultra-marine is an oxyd of lapis lazuli,and has this great advantage, that it never fades, evenwhen mixed with other substances ; it is therefore to beregretted that its high price prevents its being moreused. Smalt is, formed of an oxyd of in fact, a glasscobalt and potash. Vermilion results from a union ofsulphur and quicksilver. The ochres are earths, andowe their different shades to the degrees of oxydationin which the iron with which they are impregnated. isUmber, again, is an earth of an ochreous nature, calledfrom Ombria, the ancient name of the duchy of Spoleto,where it was first found. The basis of Prussian-blue isiron, which, mixed with a certain portion of alkali, andexposed to the action of heat, produces this usefulcolour. It takes its name from having been accident-ally discovered by a chemist of Berlin. Indigo is extracted from the leaves of a plant, the
  86. 86. 70 COLOURS.Indigofera tinctoria. Gamboge a vegetable exuda- istion, partaking of the properties both of a gum and aresin. The madders are obtained from the root of themadder, (rubia tine tor urn,) and so strong is the colour-ing matter of this plant, that the bones of animals whichfeed on it are tinged of a deep red. MARY. You have not mentioned either lamp-black or Indian-ink. What are they composed of? AUNT. The best lamp-black is, I believe, prepared from thesoot of burnt pine-wood; but I have known persons whohave made a very good black of this kind from the sootcollected from an oil-lamp, merely adding a little gum-arabic to give it consistency. Indian-ink is a mixtureof lamp-black and glue. MARY. I do not recollect that you spoke of any green.
  87. 87. PLANT-INDIGO. Page 70.
  88. 88. COLOURS. 71 AUNT. Green is generally a compound colour. I believe theonly simple green that is at all vivid is that procured fromvcrdigrease. The one you most commonly use, Prus-sian-green, consists of Prussian-blue and yellow-ochre.Purples and lilacs, too, are usually compound colours. I am aware that, in the few colours I have named, Iperhaps have not noticed half what you will find in yourown box but I did not promise to go through the ;whole, and shall leave you to discover y our self whetherthose I have omitted are to be referred to an animal,vegetable, or mineral origin. MARY. Thank you, my dear aunt, for having given me asmuch information as you have on this subject. I shallnot rest now till I have found out what each little occu-pant of my box is composed of, for I am surprised thatI could open it, day after day, without feeling such acuriosity. I am determined I will no longer remain inignorance. AUNT. It is very useful to know whence each colour is de-
  89. 89. 72 COLOURS. you may understand how to mix it properlyrived, thatwith another. Care must be taken not to mix themineral and vegetable colours, for they destroy eachother, and, in a short time, the effect of a drawing inwhich such an error has been committed is completelyaltered.
  90. 90. THE COTTON-TREE. Page 73.
  91. 91. 73 A TRAVELLER. AUNT.Now, my dear, I shall try if I can puzzle you this morn-ing,though I do not expect to succeed, for I dare sayyou will soon discover the adventurers I am going tointroduce to you. MARY. You rather alarm me ; for if you are about to speak ofany distinguished persons whose history I ought torecollect, and I should have forgotten it, you will thinkme very forgetful and ignorant AUNT. We shall see how your memory serves. Listen to mytale.
  92. 92. 74 A TRAVELLER. " In India, my native clime, I commenced my careeras the protector of a tender infant, and may truly say Inever left my care till I found myself torn the object offrom by a power which I was unable to resist, and we itparted never to meet again. Nothing could be moreviolent and painful than the mode of our separation.However wrong it may be, it is generally remarked thatthere is a feeling almost amounting to satisfaction whenwe find we are not greater sufferers than our neighbours ;a consolation which I certainly enjoyed, for numbers ofmine were obliged to submit to the same discipline asmyself,and to part from those with whom they had been,from their springing into life, most nearly connected. Isoon found that we were to be entirely at the disposal ofour captors, and that it was their intention shortly totransport us to a foreign country. For this purpose areceptacle was prepared for us, into which we were allunceremoniously hurried ; and though we seemed at firstto be quite as close together as was at all agreeable, itwas considered by those under whose direction wewere that we puffed ourselves out, and occupied toomuch space. We were soon obliged to contract our-
  93. 93. A TRAVELLER. 75selves nay, they did not even scruple to have recourse ;to main force to make us lie nearer together, which itmay be easily imagined was far from comfortable.After we had remained in this miserable state for sometime, we were removed from the position we had hith-erto occupied, and placed on board a large vessel,where we did not meet with more consideration than inour former situation : and there was this further disad-vantage, that we were kept longer in durance, for wewere nearly six months on our voyage, uncertain of ourdestination, and of what was to be our fate on reachingit. But, dull and uncomfortable as our life was duringthis half-years imprisonment, it was delightful comparedwith what we had to undergo afterwards. On the shipsarrival in port all was bustle and confusion ; but fromone language prevailing, which we had often heardspoken in our own dear India, we felt convinced wemust be in England, that happy land of liberty, and wewere certain that here, at any rate, we should meet withmore humanity, and be released from bondage. Wewere indeed let out of our confinement, but only to betreated still more cruelly. The passengers all landed,
  94. 94. 76 A TRAVELLER.and we anxiously expected to follow but our turn did ;not come we seemed to be forgotten. At last, how- ;ever, the anticipated moment arrived, and we foundourselves on English ground. I cannot enter into adetail of all our sufferings. One of the operations towhich we were obliged to submit I can only compare tobeing on the rack, which will give some idea of therigorous treatment we experienced. After suffering theinflictions of those into whose hands we had fallen, wewere completely altered, our very nature seemed changed,and we discovered that we were thus disguised in orderto serve the ends of our tormentors. We travelled tovarious parts of the country, and in several of the pro-vincial towns we were introduced into immense build-ings, in which were rooms of enormous length, where agreat number of persons were assembled, whose wholeattention, strange to say, seemed devoted to us. Heremany of us were united together. Each of us had hith-erto led much the same kind of life, but now OUT desti-nies were exceedingly different. Some of my compa-nions, leaving the great houses I have spoken of, wereallowed to revisit their native country, not to take up

×