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The key ingredients of training coaching and
mentoring for youth entrepreneurs
OECD Capacity Building Seminar
Supporting y...
Objectives of presentation
• Stimulate thinking regarding training, coaching and
mentoring of youth entrepreneurs
• Reflec...
Contextualising youth enterprise
• Importance of understanding heterogeneity of youth
• Some are already doing it!
– Long-...
Eg. levels of entre -engagement by youth population
(Univ students, GUESSS data 2014)
4
The challenges
5
• Plethora of youth enterprise initiatives
– Local, national, international; 50+ years (eg. Young
Enterpr...
Stereotyping capabilities for youth entrepreneurship
• Enthusiasm and motivation
• Cultural context: socialisation, educat...
Career intentions: 5 yrs and immediately after studies
• Rise in interest in business ownership with time
7
Variations in career interest 5 yrs by gender
• Males more likely to be interested business ownership
8
Heterogeneity of ‘Youth’: influences on intentions
• Gender +ve males
• Age ~
• Experiences: cultural differences +ve pare...
And attendance on entrepreneurship courses (multi
response)
10
Design of youth entrepreneurship programmes
• Content and curriculum
• Focus on developing entrepreneurial mindsets
– Reco...
Enhancing skills and competencies
• Enhance the means to practise entrepreneurship
– Raise youth’s ability to mobilise res...
Trends in learning in small firms: 1980s-2000s
13
Behaviour – the person
Whole person development –
what should the entrep...
Components of effective entrepreneurship
• Knowledge and professional practice:
– eg. Competency development finance
• Ski...
Types of learning approaches
• Traditional ways of information transfer
– Classroom; distance learning; self-study
• Behav...
Typical programme content
16
Tacit learning through engagement with peers &
networks
• Partnership involvement: meet with financiers,
banks, landlords,...
Summary
• Need to identify specific requirements of youth entrepreneurs
• Tailor programmes according to
– Needs within a ...
Thank you
Robert Blackburn
r.blackburn@kingston.ac.uk
http://business.kingston.ac.uk/robertblackburn
19
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The Key ingredients of training coaching and monitoring for Youth Entrepreneurs

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The aim of this High-Level Capacity Building Seminar is have an international exchange of information on inclusive entrepreneurship actions across the European Union and on how the European Union Structural Funds can be used to support actions that combine entrepreneurship promotion and social inclusion.

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The Key ingredients of training coaching and monitoring for Youth Entrepreneurs

  1. 1. The key ingredients of training coaching and mentoring for youth entrepreneurs OECD Capacity Building Seminar Supporting youth in entrepreneurship 22nd -23rd September 2014 Professor Robert Blackburn Small Business Research Centre Kingston University http://business.kingston.ac.uk/sbrc 1
  2. 2. Objectives of presentation • Stimulate thinking regarding training, coaching and mentoring of youth entrepreneurs • Reflect on previous interventions • Help identify specific requirements for youth training • What should be delivered? • How can this be delivered effectively? • Open up discussion: experiences and wider lessons 2
  3. 3. Contextualising youth enterprise • Importance of understanding heterogeneity of youth • Some are already doing it! – Long-term attractiveness – Enterprise spans all economic activities • But most are not involved – In work; education; unemployed • A gap between entrepreneurial intentions and action (eg. EuroFlashBarometer) – Suggests ideas not been realised? 3
  4. 4. Eg. levels of entre -engagement by youth population (Univ students, GUESSS data 2014) 4
  5. 5. The challenges 5 • Plethora of youth enterprise initiatives – Local, national, international; 50+ years (eg. Young Enterprise) • But how successful have these been? – Little systematic of evidence on what works • But evidence on need to segmentation of market • Implies targeted programmes and methods of delivery – How does this relate to youth entrepreneurship?
  6. 6. Stereotyping capabilities for youth entrepreneurship • Enthusiasm and motivation • Cultural context: socialisation, education • Social & human capital? • Financial capital? • Hence, difference between entrepreneurial intentions and action • Demographics should influence content and delivery methods 6
  7. 7. Career intentions: 5 yrs and immediately after studies • Rise in interest in business ownership with time 7
  8. 8. Variations in career interest 5 yrs by gender • Males more likely to be interested business ownership 8
  9. 9. Heterogeneity of ‘Youth’: influences on intentions • Gender +ve males • Age ~ • Experiences: cultural differences +ve parental • Education levels +ve • NEETs vs Education vs Employment • Shown to influence intentions = No ‘blueprint’ for content and delivery 9
  10. 10. And attendance on entrepreneurship courses (multi response) 10
  11. 11. Design of youth entrepreneurship programmes • Content and curriculum • Focus on developing entrepreneurial mindsets – Recognising and acting on an opportunity • +ve association with levels of education • Encourage attitudinal changes – Learn by doing – Experimentation – Be prepared to accept failure and learn from it – L(earning)=O(pportunity)+C(hallenge)+H(elp)+F(orgiveness) 11
  12. 12. Enhancing skills and competencies • Enhance the means to practise entrepreneurship – Raise youth’s ability to mobilise resources – Fill gaps in youth’s social and financial capital • Fit with specific contexts and demographics – What is needed? What are the specific challenges? • Identify wider cultural and social networks – Importance of socio-economic-cultural contexts – eg. Females, minority groups, low-income, high income localities 12
  13. 13. Trends in learning in small firms: 1980s-2000s 13 Behaviour – the person Whole person development – what should the entrepreneur know? (eg. traits) Is there a recipe to be taught? - 1980s Competences – the tasks What the entrepreneur should be able to do? What can they do? Output based functional analysis - 1990s Manager in role Focused within the organisation and their community. Tacit understandings, input of others; group learning Current Manager in role – the situated learner Focused on individuals in context and their ability to critically reflect- situated learning 2000s
  14. 14. Components of effective entrepreneurship • Knowledge and professional practice: – eg. Competency development finance • Skills and attitudes: behavioural – eg. leadership technical • Meta-qualities: – ability to reflect on self-knowledge, collect new knowledge • We can i/d components but how delivered? 14
  15. 15. Types of learning approaches • Traditional ways of information transfer – Classroom; distance learning; self-study • Behavioural development- human capital – Role plays; problem solving • Meta-qualities – Action learning sets; learning to learn; i/d self- weaknesses • Many learning theories: – But need to i/d relevant balance of above 15
  16. 16. Typical programme content 16
  17. 17. Tacit learning through engagement with peers & networks • Partnership involvement: meet with financiers, banks, landlords, incubators, trade and professional organisations • Mentoring with peers – Importance of meeting and learning from peers • Face-to-face interaction effective • Delivery – context specific. egs. • Need to connect youth with knowledge networks 17
  18. 18. Summary • Need to identify specific requirements of youth entrepreneurs • Tailor programmes according to – Needs within a context (eg. current labour mkt position) – Outcomes of intervention • Encourage use of real examples from peers – Curriculum content; method of delivery – But link with learning theories and prior experiences • Monitoring and evaluation – Ongoing – Reflective • Feed into new programmes to increase efficacy 18
  19. 19. Thank you Robert Blackburn r.blackburn@kingston.ac.uk http://business.kingston.ac.uk/robertblackburn 19

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