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PLANNING FOR BREXIT: ISSUES
YOUR CHARITY NEED...
Brexit – the HR implications
Exercises in politics and fortune telling!
Peter Reeve
Head of HR MND Association / Chair Cha...
Brexit - HR implications
Currently we have clarity as to the nature of the
Brexit arrangements
Look at two areas:
1. Workf...
The run up to Brexit
• The non-UK workforce
– According to CIPD figures 27% on EU nationals in the
UK were considering lea...
The run up to Brexit
• Salary inflation and real incomes
– CPI is currently at 3.5%+
– Interest rates are back up to 0.5%
...
Brexit - Politics and employment law
The government has said that Brexit will not see
a wholescale degradation of workers ...
Brexit - uncertainty and change
Your organisation has a number of employees
who are genuinely worried about the/their futu...
Community Cohesion post-Brexit
HOPE not hate Charitable Trust
@hopenothate
http://charity.hopenothate.org.uk/
@jemma_levene
England
increasingly
tolerant and
open
39% occupy
two most
liberal tribes in
society
But 23% of
population =
active enmity...
Attitudes towards immigration are softening, caused by
changing demographics and the belief among sceptics that
Brexit wil...
Brexit
Only 6% of people are very confident Theresa May will secure a good
deal for Britain in EU negotiations.
Brexit div...
Attitudes to the Grenfell Tower disaster shows
deep divide in the country
Londoners, Labour voters and BAME draw a wider
l...
http://nationalconversation.uk/resources/
Aims:
to get people talking about difficult issues
to engage with anxious middle...
The big challenges ahead
• Britain increasingly divided. Looking at tough period of
economic downturn after Brexit, which ...
B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward
B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward
B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward
B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward
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B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward

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Presented Tuesday 14 November at the NCVO/BWB Trustee Conference 2017

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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B6: Planning for Brexit: Issues your charity needs to consider going forward

  1. 1. Drinks sponsors: Partner sponsor: Lead sponsor: Media partner: Tech partner: PLANNING FOR BREXIT: ISSUES YOUR CHARITY NEEDS TO CONSIDER GOING FORWARD CHAIR BRENDAN COSTELLOE SENIOR EXTERNAL RELATIONS OFFICER (EU), NCVO SPEAKERS DUNCAN SHRUBSOLE DIRECTOR OF POLICY, PARTNERSHIPS AND COMMUNICATIONS, LLOYDS BANK FOUNDATION JEMMA LEVENE DEPUTY DIRECTOR, HOPE NOT HATE PETER REEVE HEAD OF HR, MND ASSOCIATION AND HEAD OF CHARITIES HR NETWORK
  2. 2. Brexit – the HR implications Exercises in politics and fortune telling! Peter Reeve Head of HR MND Association / Chair Charities HR Network
  3. 3. Brexit - HR implications Currently we have clarity as to the nature of the Brexit arrangements Look at two areas: 1. Workforce Implications leading up to Brexit 2. Predictions and Implications
  4. 4. The run up to Brexit • The non-UK workforce – According to CIPD figures 27% on EU nationals in the UK were considering leaving – Applications from EU qualified nurses fallen 70% – 17% fall in seasonal workers coming to the UK EU nationals in the UK are worried and others are not coming in the first place How reliant is your organisation on EU labour and where else it might come from?
  5. 5. The run up to Brexit • Salary inflation and real incomes – CPI is currently at 3.5%+ – Interest rates are back up to 0.5% 2018 is likely to see real earnings fall - What increases in costs can you afford? - How to support people who fall into hardship?
  6. 6. Brexit - Politics and employment law The government has said that Brexit will not see a wholescale degradation of workers rights • They don’t have the seats to pass significant changes • But where were the UK reluctant adopters – EWTD, agency workers rules – watch this space What capability/capacity does your organisation have to monitor and respond to changes significant and sudden changes in employment law?
  7. 7. Brexit - uncertainty and change Your organisation has a number of employees who are genuinely worried about the/their future Employers have to play a much greater role in managing social issues – retirement, vocational education etc What communication and engagement capacity do you have to honestly and openly support and engage your people?
  8. 8. Community Cohesion post-Brexit HOPE not hate Charitable Trust @hopenothate http://charity.hopenothate.org.uk/ @jemma_levene
  9. 9. England increasingly tolerant and open 39% occupy two most liberal tribes in society But 23% of population = active enmity or latent hostile
  10. 10. Attitudes towards immigration are softening, caused by changing demographics and the belief among sceptics that Brexit will partly solve the ‘problem’. Over 90% of Britons believe immigration is essential, but economic need should determine the level of future immigration. The British public are not confident about multiculturalism and most people fear that British values are in decline. The two liberal tribes distance themselves from the majority of British public in this respect
  11. 11. Brexit Only 6% of people are very confident Theresa May will secure a good deal for Britain in EU negotiations. Brexit divides British society into two distinct groups. Little prospect that a deal can be secured without angering and further alienating one or both groups. Very little appetite for reversing Referendum result. Cautious optimism remains about economy, but people are reporting less disposable income than a year ago; increasing opposition to austerity. Expectations for future economic well-being are divided along Brexit lines, with Remain voters fearful and Leave voters more optimistic.
  12. 12. Attitudes to the Grenfell Tower disaster shows deep divide in the country Londoners, Labour voters and BAME draw a wider lesson about Britain’s unequal society where the poor lose out Those outside London, Conservatives and Nigel Farage supporters view it as an isolated unfortunate accident.
  13. 13. http://nationalconversation.uk/resources/ Aims: to get people talking about difficult issues to engage with anxious middle ground in polarised immigration debate, specifically about regaining trust after Brexit
  14. 14. The big challenges ahead • Britain increasingly divided. Looking at tough period of economic downturn after Brexit, which could trigger resentment and an increased hatred toward others • The ‘difficult conversations’ we need to have. We need to engage with concerns around integration and security • How to fight active hostility? A constant hostile section of society could easily be triggered to negative actions by increased economic insecurity and sense of betrayal through Brexit processes

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