SlideShare a Scribd company logo

informing ideas.docx

zz

1 of 10
Download to read offline
Camera angles: Every camera shot explained
Low angle shot
Any shot that is below a subject’s eye line looking up at them is a low angle shot. They are commonly
used in films that have heroes or villains as they make the subject look more powerful. The angle of the
shot can make the scene come together regardless of the other effects that have been put into place.
Overhead shot
When high angles are 90 degrees over the subject, they become “overhead shot”. They are also known
as a ‘birds eye view’ or ‘god’s eye view.’ The camera is placed over the subject straight down. Great for
complex movements such as fight scenes. If the show is about crime, they can use this shot to capture
horrific details of a crime scene. This type of angle does not just capture the subject, but also the
subject's surroundings.
Dutch Angle
The Dutch angle shot skews the horizontal axis of the frame, for an off-kilter image. This type of shot
can produce a series of effects. It can create the effect of unease, mania, terror, or bewilderment. It can
also be used to magnify tension.
Hip level angle
Can be found in every genre, but western films are where it is mostly used. This is because it is
conjunction with cowboy shot. The reasoning is because of gun holsters which are rested at hip height.
Other camera shot angles:
 High angle shot - “used to diminish a character”
 Eye level shot - “Creates a connection to the character”
 Shoulder level shot - “often used during conversations, high difference”
 Knee level - “effective way to track through an environment following a character, and character
details
 Ground level - “track a character's movement, or details in setting”
Shot size
Shot sizes can establish the rhythm, tone, and the meaning of a scene.
Establishing shot
The shot is wide enough to show the geography, time of day, scale of the subject in relation to their
environment. Can often be used to transition between scenes. Curtail for futuristic films but for any
scene or film.
Wide shot
Positions subjects far away from the camera to visually represent their relationship to their
environment. It is concerned with the scale of the subject. Used to make subjects lost, lonely, or
overwhelmed, and about their surroundings.
Medium shot
It is used a lot because it is more of a neutral shot. Captures the subject in a way like how we see people
and talk to them. You can see the characters' reactions, environment and what they are doing in one
frame. It is above the waist below their chest and ends just above their head.
Other shots
 The master shot - “captures the scene playing out entirely, providing the editor with something
to cut out to if needed.”
 Full shot “tight enough to tell the story by the characters face and environment around them”
 Medium full shot “Used to present the subject when confident”
 Medium close up - “reducing distractions and prioritize the story in characters details.”
 Close up “eye level, see and feel the character thoughts and feelings, how dramatic it can be
 Extreme close up “isolates the subject in a specific area”
6 ways to edit any scene
Editors have 3 choices when it comes to editing, what to show, when to cut and what to cut too. When
the editor cuts away from the main action, it is called “cutaway.” Walter Murch created ‘Rule of six’
includes emotions, story, rhythm, eye trace, 2D plane of screen and 3D space. Deciding what to cut too
is important, it could be to see what is on a character's mind, what they are looking at. It must be
thoughtful and impactful.
1. Eye line
An eye line match is when the editor cuts to the object of a character’s attention. The second shot is
usually the POV shot of what the character is looking at. The editors might not even do a POV shot,
because it is all about the character’s eyes that motivates the cut. Can cut the shot by doing similar
angles, mostly used in conversation scenes.
2. Cross cutting
Is when an editor cuts between two or more scenes happening in various locations usually at the same
time. Cross cutting can be an effective way to combine multi-layered action. This helps to keep the
audience interested throughout the different scenes.
3. Eye trace
When an editor cuts between two or more shots that focus on the same area of the frame. Allows the
viewers to stay focused after each cut. Can be used through blocking a camera movement, guiding the
audience’s eyes through a shot. Ideal for action scenes as they move quickly. Helps the viewers to
process even through chaotic scenes.
4. Split edits
Helps to smooth over a transition. A hard cut changes both video and audio at the same time. A split
edit changes either the sound or the image before the other. This can be known as a J cut or a L cut, they
are named by what they look like in the timeline. J cut is when audio starts to play before we see it. An L
cut is the audio plays after we have already cut away. Often used during dialogue scenes, as well as
catching reaction shots.
5. Intellectual montage
Puts unrelated images together, to create a certain feeling or idea. This montage creates the Euleshov
effect, which creates meaning out of cinematic juxtaposition. Two separate scenes combined to create a
single idea. Can use this to provoke meaning and emotions on scenes that might not have had them.
6. Cut on action
Refers cutting to an object or characters movement. Can be used for simple and complex actions. Will
use this technique to make the cut look more natural. Often used in fight scenes because it is placed in a
fast placed rhythm and quick movement. Cutting on impact makes the kick or punch more impactful,
can be able to keep up with the pace, strengthen the stunts and create a more epic feel on the fight.
Other types of cuts
 Freeze frame
 Invisible cuts
 Subliminal frames
 Double cuts
 Jump cuts
Diegetic vs non-diegetic sound
Sound can become unnoticed during a film, but it can be impactful and is essential for any filmmaker.
Diegetic is derived from ‘diegesis’ which means the world of the film and everything in it. Everything
that the characters experience is diegetic. Everything that the audience only perceives is non-diegetic.
Diegesis is telling a story and how the narrator perceives it. Some non-diegetic's are visual example title
cards, text on the screen and some non-diegetic inserts.
Michel Chion developed this visualization to mark the difference. He put all the different sounds under
categories such as acousmatic – offscreen, zones- non-diegetic and visualized zone – onscreen.
Diegetic sound
If the characters can hear the sounds, it is diegetic. Includes atmospheric sounds such as the weather,
vehicles, weapons, music inside the film, dialogue, and some form of voice over. If the voiceover
represents a character’s thoughts it is known as “internal diegetic sound.” This helps to create and
establish the world around the characters. It can also have an enormous impact on the overall story.
Sounds we hear off screen can identify the setting and help us to understand the world outside the
frame that we see. Diegetic sound can be manipulated to let us hear what the character hears. Also use
sound to experience what someone is going through mentally in that scene.
Non- diegetic sound

More Related Content

Similar to informing ideas.docx

Micro elements
Micro elementsMicro elements
Micro elementsmaximecabo
 
Mise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationMise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationlucymediagg
 
Mise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationMise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationlucymediagg
 
Media prezzie bap bap
Media prezzie bap bapMedia prezzie bap bap
Media prezzie bap bapCaelumAllett
 
Analysis of micro elements
Analysis of micro elementsAnalysis of micro elements
Analysis of micro elementsGeorgePic
 
Media glossary
Media glossaryMedia glossary
Media glossaryMsCalver
 
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01Mrs Downie
 
Understanding micro elements power point example
Understanding micro elements power point exampleUnderstanding micro elements power point example
Understanding micro elements power point examplekbrunt
 
Camera shots and types
Camera shots and typesCamera shots and types
Camera shots and typesRachel Heyes
 
Micro elements
Micro elementsMicro elements
Micro elementssimply24
 
Tia key concepts
Tia   key conceptsTia   key concepts
Tia key conceptsCat Davies
 
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.adeab
 
Media studies micro elements
Media studies  micro elements Media studies  micro elements
Media studies micro elements Reba05
 
Camera angles presentation
Camera angles presentationCamera angles presentation
Camera angles presentationtiffanysigsworth
 

Similar to informing ideas.docx (20)

Micro elements
Micro elementsMicro elements
Micro elements
 
Mise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationMise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentation
 
Mise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentationMise en scène & camera presentation
Mise en scène & camera presentation
 
Media prezzie bap bap
Media prezzie bap bapMedia prezzie bap bap
Media prezzie bap bap
 
Analysis of micro elements
Analysis of micro elementsAnalysis of micro elements
Analysis of micro elements
 
Evaluation - Question 1
Evaluation - Question 1Evaluation - Question 1
Evaluation - Question 1
 
As level tv drama 2
As level tv drama 2As level tv drama 2
As level tv drama 2
 
Media glossary
Media glossaryMedia glossary
Media glossary
 
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01
Glossary 120701153506-phpapp01
 
Understanding micro elements power point example
Understanding micro elements power point exampleUnderstanding micro elements power point example
Understanding micro elements power point example
 
Camera shots and types
Camera shots and typesCamera shots and types
Camera shots and types
 
Micro elements
Micro elementsMicro elements
Micro elements
 
As level tv drama 2
As level tv drama 2As level tv drama 2
As level tv drama 2
 
Tia key concepts
Tia   key conceptsTia   key concepts
Tia key concepts
 
Filming treatment
Filming treatmentFilming treatment
Filming treatment
 
Camera shots
Camera shotsCamera shots
Camera shots
 
Shot types and positions
Shot types and positionsShot types and positions
Shot types and positions
 
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.
Cinematogrpahy Powerpoint.
 
Media studies micro elements
Media studies  micro elements Media studies  micro elements
Media studies micro elements
 
Camera angles presentation
Camera angles presentationCamera angles presentation
Camera angles presentation
 

More from MollyBrown86

Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxMollyBrown86
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdfMollyBrown86
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders (1).pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders (1).pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders (1).pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders (1).pdfMollyBrown86
 
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxPitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxMollyBrown86
 
Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxMollyBrown86
 
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxPitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxMollyBrown86
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdfMollyBrown86
 
Short film storyboard
Short film storyboardShort film storyboard
Short film storyboardMollyBrown86
 
Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxMollyBrown86
 
Audience profile - SF.pptx
Audience profile - SF.pptxAudience profile - SF.pptx
Audience profile - SF.pptxMollyBrown86
 
Pitch presentation - short film.pptx
Pitch presentation - short film.pptxPitch presentation - short film.pptx
Pitch presentation - short film.pptxMollyBrown86
 
Responses from google forms SF.pptx
Responses from google forms SF.pptxResponses from google forms SF.pptx
Responses from google forms SF.pptxMollyBrown86
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdfMollyBrown86
 
Risk Assessment - Short film.docx
Risk Assessment - Short film.docxRisk Assessment - Short film.docx
Risk Assessment - Short film.docxMollyBrown86
 
Development (1).docx
Development (1).docxDevelopment (1).docx
Development (1).docxMollyBrown86
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdfMollyBrown86
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdfMollyBrown86
 

More from MollyBrown86 (20)

Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docx
 
Planning.docx
Planning.docxPlanning.docx
Planning.docx
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders (1).pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders (1).pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders (1).pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders (1).pdf
 
Planning.docx
Planning.docxPlanning.docx
Planning.docx
 
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxPitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
 
Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docx
 
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptxPitch responses - short film.pptx
Pitch responses - short film.pptx
 
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdfScript Dying on the inside - short film  eating disorders.pdf
Script Dying on the inside - short film eating disorders.pdf
 
Short film storyboard
Short film storyboardShort film storyboard
Short film storyboard
 
Research - short film.docx
Research - short film.docxResearch - short film.docx
Research - short film.docx
 
Audience profile - SF.pptx
Audience profile - SF.pptxAudience profile - SF.pptx
Audience profile - SF.pptx
 
Pitch presentation - short film.pptx
Pitch presentation - short film.pptxPitch presentation - short film.pptx
Pitch presentation - short film.pptx
 
Responses from google forms SF.pptx
Responses from google forms SF.pptxResponses from google forms SF.pptx
Responses from google forms SF.pptx
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-15-11-29-14.pdf
 
contributors form
contributors formcontributors form
contributors form
 
Risk Assessment - Short film.docx
Risk Assessment - Short film.docxRisk Assessment - Short film.docx
Risk Assessment - Short film.docx
 
Development (1).docx
Development (1).docxDevelopment (1).docx
Development (1).docx
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-27.pdf
 
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdfscan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdf
scan_22001305_2023-12-14-11-49-01.pdf
 

Recently uploaded

APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, Thailand
APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, ThailandAPAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, Thailand
APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, ThailandAPNIC
 
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defense
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & DefenseAugmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defense
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defensethirdeyegen65
 
Red shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspace
Red shadows ringing in Japan's CyberspaceRed shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspace
Red shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspacesttyk
 
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023Damar Juniarto
 
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptx
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptxUGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptx
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptxRiteshsahu101
 
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budget
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budgetModern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budget
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budgetmatt806068
 
AWS Overview of AWS Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter Tuning
AWS Overview of AWS  Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter TuningAWS Overview of AWS  Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter Tuning
AWS Overview of AWS Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter TuningVarun Garg
 
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchainhackersuli
 
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....history of tau gamma architect.1968.....
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....josephiigo
 
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...ssuser7b7f4e
 
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionals
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical ProfessionalsAugmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionals
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionalsthirdeyegen65
 

Recently uploaded (13)

APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, Thailand
APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, ThailandAPAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, Thailand
APAN 57: APNIC Report at APAN 57, Bangkok, Thailand
 
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defense
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & DefenseAugmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defense
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Aerospace & Defense
 
Red shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspace
Red shadows ringing in Japan's CyberspaceRed shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspace
Red shadows ringing in Japan's Cyberspace
 
B1 Evaluation.docx
B1 Evaluation.docxB1 Evaluation.docx
B1 Evaluation.docx
 
Riesgos online
Riesgos onlineRiesgos online
Riesgos online
 
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023
Regulation is Coming - Trusted Media Summit 2023
 
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptx
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptxUGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptx
UGBINTERNETBANKING FACILITY LAUNCHED.pptx
 
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budget
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budgetModern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budget
Modern Red Teaming - subverting mature defenses on a budget
 
AWS Overview of AWS Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter Tuning
AWS Overview of AWS  Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter TuningAWS Overview of AWS  Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter Tuning
AWS Overview of AWS Clarify, Feature Store, Hyper parameter Tuning
 
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain
[Hackersuli]Privacy on the blockchain
 
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....history of tau gamma architect.1968.....
history of tau gamma architect.1968.....
 
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...
Obstructive jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of...
 
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionals
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical ProfessionalsAugmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionals
Augmented and Mixed Reality Solutions for Frontline Medical Professionals
 

informing ideas.docx

  • 1. Camera angles: Every camera shot explained Low angle shot Any shot that is below a subject’s eye line looking up at them is a low angle shot. They are commonly used in films that have heroes or villains as they make the subject look more powerful. The angle of the shot can make the scene come together regardless of the other effects that have been put into place. Overhead shot When high angles are 90 degrees over the subject, they become “overhead shot”. They are also known as a ‘birds eye view’ or ‘god’s eye view.’ The camera is placed over the subject straight down. Great for complex movements such as fight scenes. If the show is about crime, they can use this shot to capture horrific details of a crime scene. This type of angle does not just capture the subject, but also the subject's surroundings.
  • 2. Dutch Angle The Dutch angle shot skews the horizontal axis of the frame, for an off-kilter image. This type of shot can produce a series of effects. It can create the effect of unease, mania, terror, or bewilderment. It can also be used to magnify tension. Hip level angle Can be found in every genre, but western films are where it is mostly used. This is because it is conjunction with cowboy shot. The reasoning is because of gun holsters which are rested at hip height. Other camera shot angles:  High angle shot - “used to diminish a character”  Eye level shot - “Creates a connection to the character”  Shoulder level shot - “often used during conversations, high difference”  Knee level - “effective way to track through an environment following a character, and character details  Ground level - “track a character's movement, or details in setting”
  • 3. Shot size Shot sizes can establish the rhythm, tone, and the meaning of a scene. Establishing shot The shot is wide enough to show the geography, time of day, scale of the subject in relation to their environment. Can often be used to transition between scenes. Curtail for futuristic films but for any scene or film. Wide shot Positions subjects far away from the camera to visually represent their relationship to their environment. It is concerned with the scale of the subject. Used to make subjects lost, lonely, or overwhelmed, and about their surroundings.
  • 4. Medium shot It is used a lot because it is more of a neutral shot. Captures the subject in a way like how we see people and talk to them. You can see the characters' reactions, environment and what they are doing in one frame. It is above the waist below their chest and ends just above their head. Other shots  The master shot - “captures the scene playing out entirely, providing the editor with something to cut out to if needed.”  Full shot “tight enough to tell the story by the characters face and environment around them”  Medium full shot “Used to present the subject when confident”  Medium close up - “reducing distractions and prioritize the story in characters details.”  Close up “eye level, see and feel the character thoughts and feelings, how dramatic it can be  Extreme close up “isolates the subject in a specific area” 6 ways to edit any scene Editors have 3 choices when it comes to editing, what to show, when to cut and what to cut too. When the editor cuts away from the main action, it is called “cutaway.” Walter Murch created ‘Rule of six’ includes emotions, story, rhythm, eye trace, 2D plane of screen and 3D space. Deciding what to cut too is important, it could be to see what is on a character's mind, what they are looking at. It must be thoughtful and impactful.
  • 5. 1. Eye line An eye line match is when the editor cuts to the object of a character’s attention. The second shot is usually the POV shot of what the character is looking at. The editors might not even do a POV shot, because it is all about the character’s eyes that motivates the cut. Can cut the shot by doing similar angles, mostly used in conversation scenes. 2. Cross cutting Is when an editor cuts between two or more scenes happening in various locations usually at the same time. Cross cutting can be an effective way to combine multi-layered action. This helps to keep the audience interested throughout the different scenes. 3. Eye trace When an editor cuts between two or more shots that focus on the same area of the frame. Allows the viewers to stay focused after each cut. Can be used through blocking a camera movement, guiding the audience’s eyes through a shot. Ideal for action scenes as they move quickly. Helps the viewers to process even through chaotic scenes. 4. Split edits Helps to smooth over a transition. A hard cut changes both video and audio at the same time. A split edit changes either the sound or the image before the other. This can be known as a J cut or a L cut, they are named by what they look like in the timeline. J cut is when audio starts to play before we see it. An L cut is the audio plays after we have already cut away. Often used during dialogue scenes, as well as catching reaction shots. 5. Intellectual montage Puts unrelated images together, to create a certain feeling or idea. This montage creates the Euleshov effect, which creates meaning out of cinematic juxtaposition. Two separate scenes combined to create a single idea. Can use this to provoke meaning and emotions on scenes that might not have had them.
  • 6. 6. Cut on action Refers cutting to an object or characters movement. Can be used for simple and complex actions. Will use this technique to make the cut look more natural. Often used in fight scenes because it is placed in a fast placed rhythm and quick movement. Cutting on impact makes the kick or punch more impactful, can be able to keep up with the pace, strengthen the stunts and create a more epic feel on the fight. Other types of cuts  Freeze frame  Invisible cuts  Subliminal frames  Double cuts  Jump cuts Diegetic vs non-diegetic sound Sound can become unnoticed during a film, but it can be impactful and is essential for any filmmaker. Diegetic is derived from ‘diegesis’ which means the world of the film and everything in it. Everything that the characters experience is diegetic. Everything that the audience only perceives is non-diegetic. Diegesis is telling a story and how the narrator perceives it. Some non-diegetic's are visual example title cards, text on the screen and some non-diegetic inserts. Michel Chion developed this visualization to mark the difference. He put all the different sounds under categories such as acousmatic – offscreen, zones- non-diegetic and visualized zone – onscreen. Diegetic sound If the characters can hear the sounds, it is diegetic. Includes atmospheric sounds such as the weather, vehicles, weapons, music inside the film, dialogue, and some form of voice over. If the voiceover represents a character’s thoughts it is known as “internal diegetic sound.” This helps to create and establish the world around the characters. It can also have an enormous impact on the overall story. Sounds we hear off screen can identify the setting and help us to understand the world outside the frame that we see. Diegetic sound can be manipulated to let us hear what the character hears. Also use sound to experience what someone is going through mentally in that scene. Non- diegetic sound
  • 7. Everything the characters cannot hear is non-diegetic sound. Includes sound effects, musical score, and forms of narration. Also, if the narrator plays no role in the film this is also considered non-diegetic. Non- diegetic sound effects can enhance motion and movement. Examples can be for comedy for punch lines for a joke, score. Non-diegetic music can play a significant role in enhancing the film experience. They can make the scene more important, eventful and more fitting. Trans - diegetic sound This is where the sound can be assumed to be diegetic but is non-diegetic and vis Verser. We might hear non-diegetic sore that becomes diegetic playing on the character’s radio. There are loads of diverse ways and methods this can be perceived, and it can link well with what is happening around the character. This also works for sound effects. Switching from diegetic to non-diegetic can be a nuanced way to blur the lines between fantasy and reality. Creative exceptions These are sounds that do not fit into any of these categories. There are loads of separate ways sounds can change throughout a scene or different scenes in the film. These two distinct types of sounds can be just as useful as cinematography and editing while telling a story. What is mise en scene? Mise en scene is the essence of filmmaking, every director does this even if they do not realize it. The meaning is “the placement of actors and scenery on a stage for a theatrical, film or television production.” Andre Bazin divided filmmaking into mise en scene and montage. Montage filmmakers create meaning from the combination and juxtaposition of multiple images. Mise en scene filmmakers concentrate on storytelling from a single image. Everything we see is part of mise en scene. There are two traditions, naturalistic and theatrical. Naturalistic is where the world in the film is meant to match our own. Familiar and realistic. Theatrical is where we are presented to unrealistic worlds that are normal. Every camera movement technique explained Films are made up of sequences, scenes, and shots. Loads of camera movements with their own language and purpose.
  • 8. Static Commonly captured by locking the camera to a tripod and placing it without any movement. Use static shots to trap a character to show their helplessness. Pan The pan rotates the camera horizontally left or right while remaining in a fixed position. Can be used to follow a character or show information. A slow pan builds anticipation, and a fast pan heightens the intensity of the shot. These are known as whip pans, can be used to create relationships between characters. Tilt Directs the camera upwards or downwards, used to capture the vertically of the characters work. Shows the characters dominance or vulnerability. Push in Moves the camera towards the subject. Making the audience know that this scene is important. Push in on an object, text and will direct our attention to a detail, can capture a character’s thoughts. Effective way to communicate internal conflict. This helps to elevate the tension of the scene. Pull out Pull the camera out deemphasizes the subject, to make us disconnect from the characters, can show the setting, context, or characters of the scene. Makes us detach from the scene or entire film. Can highlight the characters emotions to play an effect of abandoning the subject. Zoom Zoom shots change the focal length of the camera’s lens, to zoom in or out. Can reveal the context around the subject. They are unique as it is unnatural as our eyes cannot zoom. Can draw our attention to a detail, a horror film will go slowly to create uneasiness. A fast zoom is known as a crash zoom, can be used for dramatic or comedic effects. Dolly zooms utilize a dolly movement and lens zoom to create
  • 9. the vertigo effect. It can be done two unusual ways, one can be dolly in while zooming out, causes the background to grow inside while maintaining the scale of the foreground. The second is by dolly out by zooming in, making the subject dominate the background. Can be used to convey positive and negative mental effects. Camera roll Turns the camera on its long axis, while maintaining the direction of the lens. This can make the scene look unsetting and disorientated. Can be used to capture characters' movements in panic, conflict. It can be disconcerting example when a villain steals the throne. Can be used to visually reinforce the theme. With profound effect it can accent movement or dramatic shifts in the narrative. Tracking Physically moves the camera through a scene, following the subject they do not move forward or away from the subject they move with the subject. When the subjects are on the move the camera will track them wherever they go. Will ask two questions where they going? What will happen when they get there? Can draw our attention to specific actions. Can be used to build tension. Either follows or leads the subject. Trucking This is where the camera moves laterally left or right. Will show the world of the film and the characters from a storyboard perspective. Can be engaging as you are following the character and their actions. Arc A camera movement that orbits around the subject can be vertical and horizontal. Adds dynamic movement while the characters are standing still. Keep our focus on panic, intimacy, or heroism. When the speed is amplified it can create a dizzy effect which can reflect the character’s mental state. Boom shot Moves the camera up or down utilizing a crane, jib, or pedestal. Small boom shot movements are commonly used to reveal information. Large boom movements capture action and the world around the subjects. Can also capture a character’s mental state by their physical state. Random movement
  • 10. Can be defined by camera shake, incidental zoom, or any movements that happen on the fly. Often added to create a subjective experience for a more inmate effect. Gives the impression that the events are happening in real time when anything can happen. Can use multiple camera movements in one scene to create more of an effect.